D.I.Y. Friday: Homemade Apple Butter
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Welcome to D.I.Y. Fridays, an occasional Friday blog series in which I’ll show you how to D.I.Y. a basic (sometimes naturally gluten free) condiment (like today’s homemade apple butter) or … more »

Homemade Apple ButterWelcome to D.I.Y. Fridays, an occasional Friday blog series in which I’ll show you how to D.I.Y. a basic (sometimes naturally gluten free) condiment (like today’s homemade apple butter) or other ingredient that you might be inclined to buy—for a whole lot more coin. Usually, the recipe will be for something that I either have used in the past in recipes here on the blog, or intend to use in the future. I tend to bury recipes like this in other, bigger recipes, but then they can be hard to find when you’re looking for ‘em. Friday is really the start of the weekend, and the weekend is a great time for cooking and baking, and for saving some money in the process. Have you ever bought apple butter? It’s nothing more than cooked apples that have been sweetened, spiced and reduced, but a small 1-pound jar can easily run you $8 to $10.

Homemade Apple ButterWhen I’m making applesauce, I peel, core and slice apples thinly. They cook down really quickly that way, and the sauce is still pretty chunky if you handle it gently. But when I’m making apple butter, a quick and easy medium-grate is the way to go. There’s no need to core the apples when you grate them, either, which saves some active cooking time. Just grate down to the core and move on to the next unsuspecting apple. Once the mixture is cooked and reduced, process it in a blender or food processor for a silky smooth butter (or leave it as is—it will still taste nearly the same and perform just as well in recipes).
Homemade Pumpkin ButterWhy make apple butter at all, you ask? Well, allow me to refresh your recollection of (or introduce you to) all of the recipes that we made last year and the year before with the homemade pumpkin butter you see above: everything from pumpkin chocolate chip squares and pumpkin donuts to crispy pumpkin animal crackers and fudgy pumpkin brownies. Why pumpkin butter instead of pureed pumpkin? Same reason for preferring apple butter to applesauce in baking: applesauce and pureed pumpkin just have too much moisture to make anything other than a cake (or a cookie that looks like a cookie but tastes like a cake). Try to balance the moisture by tweaking the other ingredients in the recipe and you just end up changing the taste and texture for the worse. But apple butter and pumpkin butter are thick enough to add taste, texture and flavor—without making cake where you meant to make cookies. Or even crunchy pumpkin biscotti.

Homemade Apple ButterIn the coming weeks, we’ll be baking with apple butter so why not make some this weekend? In the meantime, it’s delicious on toast, and I have a sneaking suspicion that you could make any of my pumpkin butter recipes into apple butter recipes by swapping out the pumpkin pie spice for an equal amount of apple pie spice, and switching the pumpkin butter for apple butter. Happy D.I.Y. Friday!

Prep time: 10 minutes       Cook time: 1 hour       Yield: About 2 1/2 cups
Ingredients

8 apples, washed and peeled (I used a mix of Granny Smith and Fuji)

4 tablespoons (84 g) pure maple syrup, plus more to taste

1/8 teaspoon kosher salt

2 teaspoons apple pie spice*

*To make your own apple pie spice, combine 4 teaspoons ground cinnamon + 1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom + 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg + 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger + 1/8 teaspoon ground allspice.

Directions
  • Grate the flesh of each of the peeled apples on a medium grate into a large, heavy-bottom saucepan. Add the maple syrup, salt and apple pie spice, and mix to combine. Place the pan over medium heat and cook, stirring occasionally, for about 45 minutes. The mixture will begin to liquify, and then will begin to cook down and darken in color. Continue to cook for up to another 15 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the mixture is evenly golden brown and the liquid has reduced, leaving behind a thick paste.

  • For perfectly smooth apple butter, transfer the mixture to a blender or food processor and process until smooth. Add more maple syrup by the teaspoonful to taste, up to another 2 tablespoons. If you add too much syrup, you will thin the apple butter. Transfer to a heat-safe container and allow to cool completely before storing in the refrigerator or using in a recipe (or on toast!).

Love,
Me

 

P.S. If you don’t have one yet, don’t forget to pick up your copy of Gluten-Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread! Your support means so much to me.

Recipe Available at: http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/homemade-apple-butter/
Super Easy Gluten Free Monkey Bread
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First things first: this is not really a proper recipe for gluten free monkey bread. That recipe is on page 143 of GFOAS Bakes Bread. This one is really just … more »

Super Easy Gluten Free Monkey Bread

First things first: this is not really a proper recipe for gluten free monkey bread. That recipe is on page 143 of GFOAS Bakes Bread. This one is really just pizza dough, jury-rigged into monkey bread. But not only did you love the idea of it from my Must Make Gluten Free Pinterest board, but this sort of super easy gluten free monkey bread is near and dear to my heart. Lemme explain…

Super Easy Gluten Free Monkey Bread

When my gluten free son (the inspiration for this site and everything that goes with it but don’t tell my other kids because all of a sudden they wish they had celiac disease) was in later infancy, he was terribly sick. It was awful. I try not to think about it too much (which is probably why I never really talk about it on the blog), and even 10 years later it’s hard for me to even look at any photos taken of him during that time, but it is what it is. He was a mess: no fat on his body, distended belly, sunken-in eyes, your basic parental nightmare. When we began a gluten free diet, he seemed to begin to improve overnight. It was nothing short of miraculous. But even once he regained weight and began to grow taller (finally!), he needed years of physical and occupational therapies to regain muscle tone and strength and for his fine motor control skills to catch up. During that time, we lucked out and got the most amazing pediatric occupational therapist in the history of the world who didn’t let him charm her out of making him do the work he needed to do with his big dimples and coy smile. As part of his therapy, she wanted Jonathan to play with Legos—and (you guessed it!) recommended that we make monkey bread using a simple pizza dough. Like this…

Super Easy Gluten Free Monkey Bread

Back then, I used quite a different gluten free pizza dough recipe, and it was much stickier and more difficult to handle. And we rolled each piece of dough pretty tight, since we were working on Jonathan’s fine motor control. We did bake and eat that monkey bread and since it was rolled in cinnamon-sugar, I don’t remember anyone complaining too much. But it really wasn’t very good. Turns out that the last thing you want to do with pizza dough when you’re using it to make a super easy monkey bread is to roll it tight! So instead, here we just roll the pizza dough out, cut out rounds, and dredge them in butter, then cinnamon sugar before layering them in a loaf pan and baking it all.

Super Easy Gluten Free Monkey Bread

Spoonforkbacon calls this cinnamon-sugar messy bread, and that it is (messy, I mean). But tender and delicious, and perfect for my gluten free son, who’s now a healthy, athletic and smart almost-11-year-old boy. Oh, and my 2 girls love it, too. And their dad. Okay, and their mom.

Prep time: 15 minutes       Cook time: 25 minutes       Yield: 6 servings
Ingredients

1 recipe Thick-Crust Gluten Free Pizza Dough from GFOAS Bakes Bread (reprinted here on the blog), prepared through the first rise*

3/4 cup (150 g) granulated sugar

1 tablespoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

6 tablespoons (84 g) unsalted butter, melted

Glaze
3/4 cup (86 g) confectioners’ sugar

1 tablespoon milk (any kind), plus more by the 1/4 teaspoonful if necessary

*Note: If you prefer, rather than allowing the dough its first rise for at least 12 hours in a sealed container in the refrigerator before working with it, you may make and use the pizza dough on the same day. It will not be as easy to handle, however, but you can work with it. To use the dough the same day it is made, after making the dough, set the covered dough to rise in a warm, draft-free environment to allow it to rise to double its size (about 1 hour). Once it has doubled, place it in the refrigerator for at least 15 minutes or until it is chilled. This will make it much easier to handle. Then, continue with the rest of the recipe instructions.

Directions
  • Preheat your oven to 350°F. Line a standard 9-inch x 5-inch (or smaller) loaf pan with unbleached parchment paper, making sure that some of the paper extends over the edges of the pan. Set the pan aside.

  • On a lightly floured surface, knead the risen and chilled pizza dough lightly until smoother as directed in  These General Shaping Tips. Sprinkle the dough lightly with more flour, and pat or roll it out into a rectangle about 1-inch thick. Using a 3/4-inch round cookie cutter (or the open underside of a pastry tip of similar size), cut out rounds of dough, flouring the cutter as necessary to prevent sticking. Do not pack the dough or roll the pieces into a ball. Place the granulated sugar, cinnamon and salt in a deep, small bowl, and mix to combine well. Place each of the pieces of dough in the melted butter, remove with the tines of a fork to allow excess butter to drip off and place in the bowl of cinnamon sugar. With a fork or spoon, toss to coat and remove to the prepared loaf pan. Create a single, even layer of prepared balls of dough on the bottom of the loaf pan, and build up until you reach the top of the loaf pan. You may have some pizza dough left over, depending upon the size of your loaf pan. Press down gently on the dough in the pan and cover loosely with a piece of oiled plastic wrap. Allow the dough to rise slightly, just until it begins to swell (about 20 minutes).

  • Remove the plastic wrap, and place the loaf pan on a baking sheet in case any of the cinnamon-sugar mixture leaks out of the loaf pan. Place in the center of the preheated oven and bake until lightly golden brown and the loaf springs back when pressed gently on top (about 25 minutes). Remove from the oven and allow to cool for at least 30 minutes in the pan.

  • When the bread is nearly cool, make the glaze. In a small bowl, place the confectioners’ sugar and 1 tablespoon of milk. Mix well, until a thick paste forms. Add more milk by the 1/4-teaspoon, mixing to combine well, until the glaze falls off the spoon slowly, in a thick but pourable glaze. Add milk very slowly, as it is much easier to thin, than to thicken, the glaze. If you do thin the glaze too much, add more confectioners’ sugar a teaspoon at a time to thicken it. Lift the bread out of the loaf pan, peel back the parchment and drizzle the glaze generously over the top of the bread. Allow to set at room temperature.

  • Adapted from the Cinnamon-Sugar Messy Bread on Spoonforkbacon.com, as selected by you from my Must Make Gluten Free Pinterest board.

Love,
Me

 

P.S. If you haven’t yet, I hope you’ll consider picking up a copy of Gluten Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread! There’s a new cookbook coming out early next year, too!

Recipe Available at: http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/super-easy-gluten-free-monkey-bread/
Gluten Free Apple Pie Cookies
16

I’m not sure exactly when it happened, but the weather really has turned here in New York. Suddenly, it’s super comfortable to wear my favorite jeans all day and I … more »

Gluten Free Apple Pie Cookies

I’m not sure exactly when it happened, but the weather really has turned here in New York. Suddenly, it’s super comfortable to wear my favorite jeans all day and I even get to break out a jacket in the evenings. We have our annual trip to the apple orchard with friends in the books for the last weekend in September, and I can’t wait until my worst food problem is deciding which apple recipes to make, like, right away before the apples go bad (one bad one really does spoil the whole bunch). Okay who am I kidding my worst food problem is always what to make for dinner because I just.don’t.want.to.make.it (do they really have to eat dinner every single day??). But you know what I mean. In preparation for this apple bounty coming my way, I decided to make gluten free apple pie cookies. But they couldn’t be sugar cookies shaped like apple pies or mini actual apple pies. I wanted an easy drop cookie that still had all the taste of apple pie, without any of the fuss. Mission accomplished!

Gluten Free Apple Pie Cookies

Like baking with pumpkin, baking with apples means loads of extra moisture. Extra moisture in cookies usually means something shaped like a cookie that actually tastes like a piece of cake. That’s what happens when you try to replace oil or butter with applesauce in a recipe. No thank you. If anything is going to taste like cake, it should be, well, cake. So instead of adding applesauce, I used a peeled and grated apple. And I’m happy to report that, after 4 separate tries and many dozens of cookie-shaped mini cakes, we have real thick-and-chewy apple cookies.

Gluten Free Apple Pie Cookies

The cookies themselves aren’t loaded with tons and tons of sugar, and the whole batch only has 4 ounces of white chocolate chips, so the glaze really adds a nice touch of extra sweetness. But of course you could leave it off if you’re just not into that sort of thing. These also freeze incredibly well, and really do have all the aroma and flavor of apple pie. If there’s a person who doesn’t love fall, I’ve never met him!

Prep time: 10 minutes       Cook time: 12 minutes       Yield: 14 cookies
Ingredients

Cookies
1 1/2 cups (210 g) all purpose gluten free flour (I used Better Batter)

3/4 teaspoon xanthan gum (omit if your blend already contains it)

1/4 cup (36 g) cornstarch

4 ounces white chocolate chips

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1 1/2 teaspoons apple pie spice*

3/4 cup (150 g) granulated sugar

1 medium-size apple, peeled and grated (80 g) (I used Granny Smith, but any firm apple will do)

10 tablespoons (140 g) unsalted butter, melted and cooled

1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract

1 egg (60 g, weighed out of shell) at room temperature, beaten

*To make your own apple pie spice, combine 4 teaspoons ground cinnamon + 1/2 teaspoon ground cardamom + 1/2 teaspoon freshly grated nutmeg + 1/4 teaspoon ground ginger + 1/8 teaspoon ground allspice.

Glaze
3/4 cup (86 g) confectioners’ sugar

1 tablespoon milk (any kind), plus more by the 1/4 teaspoonful if necessary

Directions
  • Preheat your oven to 325°F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with unbleached parchment paper and set aside.

  • In a large bowl, place the flour, xanthan gum and cornstarch, and whisk to combine well. Transfer 1 teaspoon of the dry ingredients to a small bowl, add the chocolate chips and toss to combine. Set aside. To the large bowl of dry ingredients, add the baking soda, salt, apple pie spice and sugar, and whisk to combine well. Add the grated apple, and mix to combine, working to separate the apple pieces from one another. Create a well in the center of the dry ingredients and add the butter, vanilla and egg, mixing to combine after each addition. The dough will be thick and sticky. Add the chips and reserved dry ingredients and mix until the chips are evenly distributed throughout.

  • Divide the dough into 14 equal parts, each about 1 1/2 tablespoonful. With wet hands, roll each piece of dough into a ball and place on the prepared baking sheet 2-inches apart from one another. With wet fingers, flatten and spread each ball into a disk about 1/2-inch thick. Place in the refrigerator to chill until firm (about 10 minutes). Place in the center of the preheated oven and bake until lightly golden brown on the edges (about 12 minutes). Remove from the oven and allow to cool completely on the baking sheet.

  • When the cookies are nearly cool, make the glaze. In a small bowl, place the confectioners’ sugar and 1 tablespoon of milk. Mix well, until a thick paste forms. Add more milk by the 1/4-teaspoon, mixing to combine well, until the glaze falls off the spoon slowly, in a thick but pourable glaze. Add milk very slowly, as it is much easier to thin, than to thicken, the glaze. If you do thin the glaze too much, add more confectioners’ sugar a teaspoon at a time to thicken it. Drizzle the glaze over the cooled cookies and allow to set at room temperature.

Love,
Me

 

P.S. If you don’t have one yet, don’t forget to pick up your copy of Gluten-Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread! Your support means so much to me.

Recipe Available at: http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/gluten-free-apple-pie-cookies/
Gluten Free Beer Battered Chicken Fingers
9

Have you ever had beer-battered chicken? It’s light and fluffy and really doesn’t taste like beer. I’ve made it with a couple different kinds of gluten free beer (Dogfish is … more »

Gluten Free Beer-Battered Chicken Fingers

Have you ever had beer-battered chicken? It’s light and fluffy and really doesn’t taste like beer. I’ve made it with a couple different kinds of gluten free beer (Dogfish is the gluten free beer I like best; Bard’s is also good, and seems to be widely available), but I love love love Angry Orchard hard apple cider and have made it with that, too (so okay then it’s really hard cider-battered chicken), and it’s delicious. Nonalcoholic sparkling apple cider is also a great alternative. I find deep frying so much more enjoyable in my teeny tiny little Cuisinart deep fryer (no affiliate link, no sponsorship, just an honest rec), especially since I throw both the frying basket and the top in the dishwasher (remove the charcoal filter first!). My house doesn’t smell deep-fried, and the mess is totally contained. C’mon. Think of the Gluten Free Biscuit Donuts you could make!

Gluten Free Beer-Battered Chicken Fingers Step by Step

I like to make beer battered chicken in a tempura-style batter, since it makes a very light and fluffy crust, which is especially nice on chicken strips since they don’t have their own skin. Marinate it first in buttermilk or plain yogurt, and then dredge it in cornstarch (can’t have corn? try arrowroot starch and let us know how it goes!) and allow the strips to sit for a bit and form a thick paste. That really helps the beer batter stick to the chicken (like, a lot) and makes for a thicker crust. Looking for a more traditional KFC-style gluten free fried chicken? I’ve got that, too. But right now I’m loving these tender all white-meat gluten free beer battered chicken fingers.

Gluten Free Beer-Battered Chicken Fingers

As soon as you bite into one of these strips, hot out of the fryer, you won’t believe how they melt in your mouth. They really don’t neeeeeeed it, but a sweet and sour dipping sauce is a nice lily-gilding measure you probably won’t regret. Make these for a crowd, and they can even be kept at room temperature for a few hours and still taste amazing. In fact, if there’s any left, try them cold the next day. That’s when you do want to break out the dipping sauce. Leftover perfection!

Prep time: 20 minutes       Cook time: 20 minutes       Yield: About 16 chicken fingers
Ingredients

For the chicken
2 pounds skinless, boneless chicken breasts, cut into “fingers” (about 16 pieces total)

2 cups (16 fluid ounces) buttermilk (you can use plain yogurt in place of buttermilk as long as it’s not Greek-style)

1/2 cup + 1 tablespoon (81 g) cornstarch, plus more for dredging

1 cup + 2 tablespoons (180 g) superfine white rice flour

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1 tablespoon (12 g) sugar

1/4 teaspoon smoked Spanish paprika (optional)

1 egg + 1 egg yolk, at room temperature

1 1/4 cups (10 fluid ounces) gluten free beer or gluten free hard apple cider (can use sparkling apple cider for a nonalcoholic alternative)

Oil, for frying

For the sweet and sour dipping sauce
1/2 cup apricot preserves or jam

2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar (or other mild white vinegar)

2 tablespoons tomato ketchup

1 teaspoon garlic powder

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1/4 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce

Directions
  • Marinate the chicken. In a large, zip-top bag or large bowl, place the chicken strips and buttermilk, and stir to coat the chicken fully. Squeeze out all of the air if using a zip-top bag before sealing the bag. If using a bowl, cover the bowl tightly with plastic wrap. Place the chicken in the refrigerator to marinate for at least 2 and up to 16 hours.

  • Dredge the chicken. Line a large baking sheet with parchment paper and set it aside. In a medium-size bowl, place enough extra cornstarch for dredging the chicken strips. Remove the chicken from the marinade one piece at a time, dredge in the cornstarch to coat completely on both sides, then place the chicken on the parchment-lined baking sheet. Set aside for about 10 minutes to allow the cornstarch to adhere to the chicken and form a thick paste.

  • Make the beer batter. In a large bowl, place the 1/2 cup + 1 tablespoon cornstarch, the white rice flour, salt, sugar and (optional) paprika and whisk to combine well. In a separate small bowl, beat the egg and egg yolk with 1/4 cup of the beer until well-combined. The mixture will bubble. Create a well in the center of the large bowl with the cornstarch and white rice mixture, and pour in the beer and egg yolk mixture and the remaining 1 cup beer in a slow and steady stream, whisking to combine constantly. The batter should be about the consistency of heavy cream.

  • Fry the chicken. Line a baking sheet or flat surface with paper towels, place a wire rack on top and set aside. Place about 3-inches of frying oil in a medium-size, heavy-bottom pot or fryer. Clip a deep-fry/candy thermometer to the side of the pot or fryer, and place the oil over medium-high heat. Bring the oil temperature to 370°F. Dip each chicken strip in the beer batter and allow any excess batter to drip off the chicken. Place the chicken strips, a few at a time, in the hot oil, taking care not to crowd the oil. Fry until the chicken strips are golden brown all over (about 2 to 3 minutes per side). As soon as each batch is removed from the fryer, place on a wire rack placed over paper towels to drain and cool completely.

  • Make the dipping sauce. In a small, heat-safe bowl, place the apricot preserves/jam and microwave for 10 second to thin. Whisk the preserves/jam to loosen it. Add the remaining sweet and sour sauce ingredients, and whisk to combine well.

  • Inspired by Southernfood.about.com’s recipe, selected by you from my Must Make Gluten Free Pinterest Board.

Love,
Me

 

P.S. If you haven’t yet, please pick up your copy of Gluten-Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread. Your support means so, so much to me!

Recipe Available at: http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/gluten-free-beer-battered-chicken-fingers/
Gluten Free Yeasted Pancakes with Blueberry Compote
12

*ETA: Don’t forget tonight is the Live Facebook Q&A on Gluten Free Baking from 8:30 pm to 9:15 pm Eastern. Come to the GFOAS Facebook Page at that time, and … more »

*ETA: Don’t forget tonight is the Live Facebook Q&A on Gluten Free Baking from 8:30 pm to 9:15 pm Eastern. Come to the GFOAS Facebook Page at that time, and I’ll begin a new thread then I’m all yours for 45 minutes of gluten free baking questions!

Gluten Free Yeasted Pancakes with Blueberry Compote

I won’t ask you if you’ve ever had pancakes (or waffles, for that matter). Of course you have. But have you ever had yeasted waffles or yeasted pancakes? One of my favorite recipes from GFOAS Bakes Bread is the Yeast-Raised Waffles on page 216. They’re so beautiful, too, but I was still working on the recipe when we had the photo shoot. I’d totally share that recipe with you here on the blog, but if I share any more recipes from the book my editor will have my head. So … at the suggestion of one very smartypants reader (I’m looking at you Michelle Beck!), today it’s a variation: gluten free yeasted pancakes. Light, tender and fluffy, with that yeasty tang. And since you make the batter ahead of time, they’re actually more convenient. What? They are!

Gluten Free Yeasted Pancakes - Step by Step

See how puffy and fluffy the batter gets? Then you stir it down, add more milk and eggs, and you’re ready to make pancakes in moments. The batter behaves a bit differently than baking-powder pancakes, which bubbles up all over when it’s time to flip. These pancakes only break through with a few big bubbles before the flip. So watch closely! And keep that heat at medium-low, okay?

Gluten Free Yeasted Pancakes with Blueberry Compote

Since I’m a big big fan of that yeasty tang, I usually keep my pancake batter in the refrigerator for at least 2 days before baking the pancakes. But if you’re in a hurry or you just want to keep the tang to a minimum, just let the batter rise on the counter for about 2 hours before finishing the batter and baking away. And serving them with a dollop of sour cream and a lightly sweet blueberry compote is the perfect breakfast-for-dinner situation, if you ask me.

Prep time: 15 minutes       Cook time: 15 minutes       Yield: 4 to 6 servings
Ingredients

Yeasted Pancakes
2 cups (280 g) Gluten Free Bread Flour*

1 1/3 teaspoons (4 g) instant yeast

2 tablespoons (24 g) sugar

1 teaspoon (6 g) kosher salt

6 tablespoons (84 g) unsalted butter, melted and cooled

3 to 3 1/4 cups (24 to 26 fluid ounces) milk, at room temperature

1 egg (60 g, weighed out of shell) + 1 egg yolk at room temperature, beaten

Blueberry Compote
2 cups frozen blueberries (if you use fresh blueberries, they will cook faster)

3 tablespoons (63 g) honey (plus more to taste)

1/8 teaspoon kosher salt

3 tablespoons (1 1/2 fluid ounces) lukewarm water

Sour cream or crème fraîche, for serving (optional)

*BREAD FLOUR NOTES

  1. 1 cup (140 g) Gluten Free Bread Flour, as discussed more fully on pages 8 to 10 of GFOAS Bakes Bread, contains 100 grams Mock Better Batter all purpose gluten free flour (or Better Batter itself) + 25 grams whey protein isolate (I use NOW Foods brand) + 15 grams Expandex modified tapioca starch (for Expandex resources, click here).
  2. For a calculator that helps you build the flour without math, please see my Gluten Free Flour page.
  3. If you would like to use Ultratex 3 in place of Expandex, please see #6 on my Resources page for instructions.
Directions
  • First, make the pancake batter. In a large bowl, combine the flour, yeast and sugar, and whisk to combine well. Add the salt, and whisk to combine. Create a well in the center of the dry ingredients, add the butter and 2 1/2 cups of the milk, and whisk to combine well. The mixture will be relatively thin. Cover the bowl very tightly with plastic wrap or transfer to a proofing bucket large enough for the dough to rise to double its size, and secure the top of your proofing bucket. Allow the batter to sit at room temperature, covered, for at least 2 hours or up to overnight. It will sweel, but will deflate easily if the batter is stirred or the bucket is shaken. The batter can also be kept, covered, in the refrigerator, for up to 2 days.

  • Make the pancakes. When you are ready to make the pancakes, heat a griddle to medium-low or a nonstick pan over medium-low heat, and grease lightly. Uncover the pancake batter, which will have swelled significantly, and stir it down. Add 1/2 cup of the remaining milk, and the eggs. Whisk to combine well. The batter should be thickly pourable. Add more milk by the tablespoon, whisking it in to combine well, until the proper consistency is reached. To make silver dollar-sized pancakes, pour as many portions of about 2 tablespoons of batter each onto the hot griddle as can fit comfortably, without touching. Allow to cook until just a few large bubbles begin to break through the top of the batter in each pancake and the edges are set (about 1 ½ minutes). With a wide, flat spatula, carefully flip over each pancake, and continue to cook until set (about another 30 seconds). Larger pancakes will take longer to cook. Remove from the skillet, and repeat with the remaining batter.

  • To make the blueberry compote, combine all of the ingredients in a medium-size, heavy-bottom saucepan and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the blueberries are all softened and the mixture has begun to thicken (about 7 minutes). Serve the warm pancakes with a dollop of sour cream or crème fraîche and a dollop of the warm blueberry compote.

  • Adapted from the Yeast-Raised Waffles on page 216 of Gluten-Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread: Biscuits, Bagels, Buns, and More by Nicole Hunn.

Love,
Me

 

P.S. Have your copy of Gluten Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread yet? If not, won’t you grab one today? Your support means the world to me!

Recipe Available at: http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/gluten-free-yeasted-pancakes-blueberry-compote/
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