Two Bite Gluten Free Blonde Brownies
11

 You know that my next new gluten free cookbook after GFOAS Bakes Bread (have your copy yet? ;) is copycat recipes for every classic snack you can possibly imagine, and a few … more »

Two-Bite Gluten Free Blonde Brownies

 You know that my next new gluten free cookbook after GFOAS Bakes Bread (have your copy yet? ;) is copycat recipes for every classic snack you can possibly imagine, and a few more after that. Right? Well, copycat recipes can be the most difficult to develop. Ever. And I thought Bakes Bread was going to be the cookbook that nearly killed me (or make me stronger!), and that everything else would have to be easier. It would have to be. But with copycats, you have built-in expectations. And they’re HIGH! That, and the list of ingredients available to me is much, much shorter than the mystery ingredients on the packages of most packaged snacks. But I love it all the same. Love. Because when I finally nail that recipe, like that tub of two-bite gluten free brownies that I managed to copycat a month ago? The one that it took me 4 or more tries to get just right, so they were puffy and chewy and chocolatey, like the perfect cross between deep, rich chocolate cake and a chocolate muffin that they were born to be? It’s ridiculously exciting. Every. Single. Time.

Two-Bite Gluten Free Blonde Brownies

Speaking of those two-bite brownies, wouldn’t it just be so incredibly cliché if it took me even longer to nail a recipe for Two Bite Gluten Free Blonde Brownies? Well then color me cliché! That’s exactly what happened. But the results? Puffy, chewy blondie nirvana, suspended perfectly between actual blondie and, well, chocolate chip muffin. And anyway if you ask my children if I handled my failures like a pro, they have been instructed to say “no comment.”

Two-Bite Gluten Free Blonde Brownies

One more exciting thing about two-bite blonde brownies: I don’t think they even make them any more, like, with gluten or anything. So … if that’s true, it means that we are way ahead of the gluten-eaters. Don’t you just love it when that happens? Gluten-Eater Envy. Seek it!

Prep time: 10 minutes       Cook time: 12 to 14 minutes       Yield: 24 blonde brownies
Ingredients

1 cup  + 2 tablespoons (158 g) all-purpose gluten free flour (I like Better Batter in this recipe)

1/2 teaspoon xanthan gum (omit if your blend already contains it)

1/4 cup (36 g) cornstarch

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1/4 teaspoon baking powder

1/8 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 cup (100 g) granulated sugar

1/2 cup (108 g) packed light brown sugar

6 tablespoons (84 g) unsalted butter, at room temperature

2 tablespoons (28 g) plain yogurt, at room temperature (can also use sour cream)

2 eggs (120 g, out of shell), at room temperature

2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

4 ounces semi-sweet chocolate chips, tossed with 1 teaspoon cornstarch or extra all purpose gluten free flour

Directions
  • Preheat your oven to 325°F. Grease very well the bottom of each well of a 24-cup miniature muffin tin, and halfway up the sides. Do not grease the very top of the walls of the muffin wells. This coaxes the muffins to rise up and dome, instead of flattening on top. Trust me?

  • In a large bowl, place the flour blend, xanthan gum, cornstarch, salt, baking powder, baking soda and granulated sugar, and whisk to combine well. Add the brown sugar and whisk to combine, working out any lumps in the brown sugar. Create a well in the center of the dry ingredients, and place the butter, yogurt, eggs and vanilla, mixing to combine well after each addition. The batter will be thick and glossy. Add the chocolate chips, tossed with cornstarch, and mix until the chips are evenly distributed throughout the dough. Divide the batter evenly among the 24 prepared muffin cups.

  • Place the tin in the center of the preheated oven and bake until puffed and golden brown, and a toothpick inserted in the center comes out clean (12 to 14 minutes). Remove from the oven and allow to cool in the baking sheet for 10 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.

Love,
Me

 

P.S. If you don’t have your copy of Gluten Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread yet, won’t you grab one today? You’ll be amazed at the gluten free bread you can make. Truly amazed! Thank you so much for your support!

Recipe Available at: http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/two-bite-gluten-free-blonde-brownies/
Gluten Free Tiramisu Cupcakes
12

These gluten free tiramisu cupcakes (what are tiramisu cupcakes? my children wanted to know, as they ate them all) are so fancy! But still so super easy to prepare. Tiramisu … more »

Gluten Free Tiramisu Cupcakes

These gluten free tiramisu cupcakes (what are tiramisu cupcakes? my children wanted to know, as they ate them all) are so fancy! But still so super easy to prepare. Tiramisu cupcakes for the win! All the flavors of tiramisu, but without the raw eggs (and without the alcohol), so they’re totally kid-safe. I think they’d be lovely for Easter, but they’re also lovely for a Thursday. Or a Tuesday. You get the idea.

Gluten Free Tiramisu Cupcakes

The cupcakes are just a super simple sponge cake, baked into cupcake form. The lady fingers which form the base of “real” tiramisu are really just little finger-shaped sponge cakes, after all. There’s a recipe for classic ladyfingers in my first cookbook, and a recipe for chocolate gluten free ladyfingers here on the blog. And we’ve made classic gluten free tiramisu here on the blog before. But to be honest? I like these sweet little cupcakes better!

Gluten Free Tiramisu Cupcakes

I totally just left out any hint of alcohol in the coffee syrup that soaks into the cupcakes. I wanted to give these to my children, and perhaps even to other people’s children, and no thank you for giving them alcohol. You could absolutely add a tablespoon of dark rum to the syrup, though, for an even more authentic taste.

Gluten Free Tiramisu Cupcakes

The frosting is really just this gluten free cooked flour frosting, with much of the butter replaced with mascarpone cheese. And mascarpone cheese is proof positive that there is a heaven above.

Gluten Free Tiramisu CupcakesGluten Free Tiramisu Cupcakes

All you really need to do with the frosting is to dollop it on top. I used a pastry bag fitted with about a 1/2-inch wide plain piping tip, but that’s only because I take pictures of my food. As long as you’re a normal person who doesn’t take pictures of her food? Just dollop and get on with the eating!

Prep time: 20 minutes       Cook time: 25 minutes       Yield: 12 cupcakes
Ingredients

FOR THE CUPCAKES
1 recipe Gluten Free Sponge Cake batter

FOR THE FROSTING
1 1/2 tablespoons (12 g) cornstarch

2 tablespoons (18 g) basic xanthan gum-free gluten-free flour blend (12 g superfine white rice flour + 4 g potato starch + 2 g tapioca flour/starch)

3/4 cup (150 g) granulated sugar

dash (1/8 teaspoon) kosher salt

3/4 cup (6 fl. oz.) milk (any kind – just not nonfat)

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

4 tablespoons (56 g) unsalted butter, at room temperature (it must be at room temperature)

4 ounces (112 g) mascarpone cheese, at room temperature

FOR THE SYRUP
1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons (5 fluid ounces) strong brewed coffee (or just use water)

1/3 cup (67 g) granulated sugar

2 tablespoons (10 g) unsweetened cocoa powder (preferably Dutch-processed, if possible)

1/8 teaspoon kosher salt

FOR SERVING
Unsweetened cocoa powder, for dusting

Directions
  • Make the cupcakes. Preheat your oven to 325°F. Line the wells of a standard 12-cup muffin tin, and set it aside. Prepare the sponge cake batter according to the recipe instructions, and divide the batter evenly among the prepared wells of the muffin tin (the wells should be about 3/4 of the way full each). Place in the center of the preheated oven and bake until a toothpick inserted in the center of each cupcake comes out clean (about 2o minutes). Allow to cool for 5 minutes in the muffin tin before transferring the cupcakes to a wire rack to continue to cool.

  • Make the base for the frosting. Fill a large bowl about halfway with ice and set it aside. In a small, heavy-bottom saucepan, place the cornstarch, flour blend, sugar and salt, and whisk to combine well. Add the milk, and whisk until smooth. Cook over a medium-high flame, whisking constantly, until the mixture thickens and the whisk leaves behind a visible trail (see photo), about 4 minutes. Remove the saucepan from the heat, and scrape the mixture into a separate medium-sized bowl. Place the medium-sized bowl on top of the bowl of ice to stop the cooking of the flour and sugar mixture. Whisk in the vanilla, and allow the mixture to cool until it reaches room temperature (temperature matters tremendously here).

    ETA: For step by step photos of every stage of the process for cooked flour frosting, see my original recipe for gluten free cooked flour frosting.

  • Make the syrup. Place all the syrup ingredients in a small, heavy-bottom saucepan, and whisk to combine well. Place over medium heat and cook, stirring frequently, until the mixture just begins to thicken (about 3 minutes). Remove the syrup from the heat and brush generously over the tops of the cooling cupcakes. Allow the syrup to absorb into the cupcakes, and then brush more syrup on top until no more will absorb (it will begin to pool on top of the cupcakes).

  • Finish the frosting. Place the cooled flour and sugar mixture in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (a handheld mixer will work just fine here), and mix on medium speed until smooth. With the mixer still on medium speed, add the butter and the mascarpone cheese, mixing well after each addition. The mixture will seem almost curdled at first. Turn the mixer to high speed and mix for about 3 minutes or until the frosting turns white and becomes light and fluffy.

  • Assemble the cupcakes. Place a generous dollop of frosting on top of the syrup on each cupcake, and sprinkle lightly with cocoa powder. The cupcakes can be stored in a sealed container at room temperature for at least 24 hours.

  • *The cooked flour and sugar mixture can be stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator for about 3 days before being mixed with the room temperature butter. Simply allow it to come back to room temperature by sitting on the counter before mixing it with the butter and mascarpone cheese.

  • Adapted heavily from Martha Stewart’s Tiramisu Cupcakes recipe.

Love,
Me

 

P.S. If you haven’t yet, please pick up your copy of Bakes Bread. Your support means absolutely everything to me!!

Recipe Available at: http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/gluten-free-tiramisu-cupcakes/
Gluten Free Bread: Sandwich Thins (Whole “Wheat” Variety) Copycat Recipe
16

I reallllllly think you’re gonna like this. This gluten free bread is made with the same type of ingredients that we use in GFOAS Bakes Bread (a.k.a. The Gluten Free … more »

Gluten Free Bread: Sandwich Thins Copycat Recipe

I reallllllly think you’re gonna like this. This gluten free bread is made with the same type of ingredients that we use in GFOAS Bakes Bread (a.k.a. The Gluten Free Bread Revolution, even if I’m the only one that calls it that!), but with only one rise (yay! you love one rise!) and the dough is wet, more like English Muffins than like Hawaiian Rolls. So we’re talking shaping with wet hands, just like we used to. It’s not nearly as romantic as baking gluten free bread is most of the time for us now, but it makes a very, very light and fluffy roll, even though it’s filled with whole grains. The rolls are done in the oven before they even really brown much at all (just a bit on the bottom), and they freeze amazingly well. My kids love when they have sandwich thins for lunch.

Gluten Free Bread: Sandwich Thins Copycat Recipe

I know you want to know about the nutritional information in this gluten free bread. Good news! I calculated both the nutritional information per sandwich thin roll using my recipe PLUS the Weight Watchers Points Plus value. A few important facts about that info: First, each of my sandwich thin rolls is about 80 grams in size, which is nearly double the size of Arnold’s Sandwich Thins. Second, you can easily cut the size of these rolls (and get double the rolls) by making them 1/5 ounces each (instead of 3 ounces each). They’ll end up being about 3-inches in diameter (instead of my 5-inches), and they’ll be a bit thinner. Don’t make them too thin, or you’ll end up with a cracker. Finally, taking into account the difference in size, these gluten free sandwich thin rolls have even fewer calories than the original Arnold Sandwich Thins. BOOM!

Gluten Free Bread: Sandwich Thins Copycat Recipe

Those are all the steps. Not hard. Not hard at alllll……

Gluten Free Bread: Sandwich Thins Copycat Recipe

I have never followed Weight Watchers, so maybe I’m speaking out of turn, but as I made these rolls, much more generously than Arnold himself, they only have 5 points each. True, I put cheese on them which probably ruined everything if you’re on Weight Watchers, but of course you could enjoy these rolls with whatever you like. And one more thing! They freeze so well it’s ridiculous. Hooray for Arnold!

Prep time: 10 minutes       Cook time: 12 minutes       Yield: 12 rolls
Ingredients

2 3/4 cups (385 g) Gluten Free Bread Flour*, plus more for sprinkling

1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon (80 g) sweet white sorghum flour

3 tablespoons (27 g) teff flour (you can grind whole grain teff into a flour if you don’t have teff flour)

1/2 cup (60 g) certified gluten free oat bran (can substitute with an equal amount, by weight, oat flour)

2 2/3 teaspoons (8 g) instant yeast

1/4 cup (50 g) sugar

1 teaspoon (6 g) kosher salt

2 tablespoons (28 g) unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 egg (60 g, out of shell) at room temperature, beaten

1 1/4 cups plus 1 tablespoon (10 1/2 ounces, measure by weight!) warm water (about 110°F)

*BREAD FLOUR NOTES

  1. 1 cup (140 g) Gluten Free Bread Flour, as discussed more fully on pages 8 to 10 of GFOAS Bakes Bread, contains 100 grams Mock Better Batter all purpose gluten free flour (or Better Batter itself) + 25 grams whey protein isolate (I use NOW Foods brand) + 15 grams Expandex modified tapioca starch.
  2. For a calculator that helps you build the flour without math, please see my Gluten Free Flour page.
  3. If you would like to use Ultratex 3 in place of Expandex, please see #6 on my Resources page for instructions.
Directions
  • In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the dough hook (or a large bowl with a hand mixer fitted with dough hook attachments), place the bread flour, sorghum flour, teff flour, oat bran, yeast and sugar, and whisk to combine well with a handheld whisk. Add the salt, and whisk again to combine. Add the butter, egg and water, and mix on low speed with the dough hook until combined. Raise the mixer speed to medium and knead for about 5 minutes. The dough will be very sticky and wet, but should be smooth and stretchy. Spray a silicone spatula lightly with cooking oil spray, and scrape down the sides of the bowl.

  • Line a rimmed baking sheet with unbleached parchment paper, and set it aside. With very wet hands, divide the dough into 12 pieces of equal size, each about 3 ounces. Wetting your hands as necessary during shaping, roll each piece of dough into a ball between your palms, and place, about 3 inches apart, on the prepared baking sheet. With wet fingers, press and spread each ball into a round about 5-inches in diameter. Cover the baking sheet with oiled plastic wrap and set it aside in a warm, draft-free location to rise until puffed and nearly doubled in size (about 45 minutes), taking care to make sure that the oiled plastic wrap isn’t resting on the dough as it rises.

  • About 20 minutes before the dough has completed its final rise, preheat your oven to 350°F. Once the dough has finished rising, with a wet toothpick, dock the top of each roll by making small holes all over, turning the toothpick in a circular motion to enlarge each circle a bit (this step is optional – I didn’t notice a difference in the rise between the rolls that I docked and the ones that I didn’t). Remove the plastic wrap and place the baking sheet on the lower rack of the preheated oven. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes, or until puffed and set in the center. Allow to cool briefly in the pan before slicing horizontally and serving.

  • Nutrition Information per Sandwich Thin (each of my Gluten Free Sandwich Thins is about 80 grams, nearly double the size of Arnold’s Sandwich Thins):

    Calories 182.8 | Total Fat 3.0 g (1.5 g saturated fat) |Cholesterol 23.1 mg | Sodium 118.0 mg | Potassium 81.3 mg | Total Carbohydrate 30.3 g (Dietary Fiber 1.7 g) | Protein 7.8 g

    Weight Watchers Points Plus Points: 5

Love,
Me

 

P.S. Do you have your copy of Gluten Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread? Thank you for being part of the Gluten Free Bread Revolution!

Recipe Available at: http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/gluten-free-sandwich-thin-rolls/
Gluten Free Elephant Ears (Palmiers)
10

If it’s all the same to you, I’m gonna stick with calling these Gluten Free Elephant Ears. They are “palmiers,” but I don’t think anyone wants to start trying to sound … more »

Gluten Free Elephant Ears (Palmiers)

If it’s all the same to you, I’m gonna stick with calling these Gluten Free Elephant Ears. They are “palmiers,” but I don’t think anyone wants to start trying to sound French. Or at least doesn’t want me to start trying to sound French. Truth.

A note about the pastry dough: elephant ears begin with puff pastry. They just do. It’s really exceeding easy to make puff pastry, and that link has step by step (by step) photos to guide you along the way. You can (and should!) make it way ahead of time, so the actual elephant ear making is dead easy. BUT. If you’re just all, ‘no WAY I’m doing all that turning and folding and butter packeting,” you can still make gluten free elephant ears! Just use the Extra Flaky Buttermilk Biscuit dough from page 227 of GFOAS Bakes Bread, or even the Gluten Free Biscuits from the blog.

Gluten Free Elephant Ears (Palmiers)

Whatever you call ‘em, these super light and flaky pastries are a real personal favorite of mine. Every once in a long while, I make something for the blog (or a book) that I don’t really care for. It happens! I don’t tell you that, though. How silly would that be? I just talk about someone else loves it, or about how I love making it for someone else or something. But these pastry cookies? The layers and the sweetness and the flakiness and did I mention the layers?

Gluten Free Elephant Ears (Palmiers)

These are simply the perfect cookies for a cup of tea. With lemon, please.

Gluten Free Elephant Ears (Palmiers)

You’ll find lots and lots of different methods out there for handling the pastry dough to make elephant ears. I don’t personally care for the ones where you rooooollllll the ends of the dough together toward the center, and end up with, like, kind of a handlebar mustache. I like the fold once, fold twice, fold together sort of deal (see photos above). And I insist upon pressing down on the cut, raw cookies with a glass to compress the layers a bit before the final chilling and, finally, baking. It creates a much more integrated cookie that stays together, but still becomes super flaky as it bakes.

Gluten Free Elephant Ears (Palmiers)

And for the love of Mike, don’t skimp on the sugar. It helps keep the pastry tender, and caramelizes in the oven into the most gorgeous cookies the world has ever seen. —-> (Too much?)

Prep time: 35 minutes       Cook time: 12 minutes       Yield: 24 cookies
Ingredients

1 recipe gluten free puff pastry, made with my mock Cup4Cup gluten free flour or Better Than Cup4Cup gluten free flour (find both blends here), or my Better Batter Cup4Cup hack, chilled (plus more flour for sprinkling)*

1 cup (200 g) sugar

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1 egg white

*If you simply don’t want to go through all the “turns” and the butter packet and all that to make the real deal Gluten Free Puff Pastry, try using the Extra Flaky Buttermilk Biscuit dough from page 227 of GFOAS Bakes Bread, or even the Gluten Free Biscuits from the blog. The cookies won’t be quite as crazy layered and flaky, but they’ll still be flaky. And they’ll still have layers.

Directions
  • Preheat your oven to 375°F. Line 2 large rimmed baking sheets with unbleached parchment paper, and set aside.

  • Prepare the gluten free puff pastry according to the recipe instructions. There are full instructions, plus step by step photos, in that link. The puff pastry can be made up to 3 months ahead of time and frozen, then defrosted overnight in the refrigerator. It can also be made up to 4 days ahead of time and refrigerated until ready to use.

  • Mix the sugar and salt in a separate, medium-size bowl, until well-combined. Sprinkle 1/3 cup (67 g) of the sugar on a large, flat surface such as a large pastry board, cutting board or smooth countertop, and spread into an even, rectangular layer (about 14-inches x 16-inches in area). Place the chilled puff pastry dough on top of the sugar, sprinkle lightly with flour, and roll into a rectangle that is about 14-inches x 16-inches, and a bit more than 1/8-inch thick. Trim any irregular edges of the rectangle with a pastry cutter, pizza wheel or very sharp knife. Brush the entire top of the puff pastry rectangle with the egg white in a thin, even layer. Sprinkle another 1/3 cup (67 g) of the sugar on top of the puff pastry rectangle and spread into an even layer, and press down gently to help the sugar adhere to the dough. Gently fold each 16-inch side of the pastry rectangle 1/4 of the way toward the center (see photo). Fold the same sides again, another 1/4 of the way toward the center so that they meet in the middle (see photo). Finally, fold both edges of the now 8-inch rectangle along the center seam over one another, creating a 4-inch by 14-inch rectangle with 6 distinct layers of dough. Place the entire rectangle on the prepared baking sheet, and then in the freezer for 10 minutes or until firm.

  • Once the dough is firm, remove from the freezer and transfer the dough to a cutting board. Using a very sharp knife, slice the dough by cross-section into 24 equal pieces, each about 1/2-inch wide. Dip both sides of each piece in the remaining 1/3 cup (67 g) of sugar, and then place on the prepared baking sheets, about 2 inches apart from one another. Press the flat bottom of a glass firmly and evenly onto the top of each of the cookies on the baking sheet to compress the layers by about 1/4. Place in the freezer for about 5 minutes, or until once again firm.

  • One at a time, place the baking sheets in the preheated oven for 9 minutes, or until the cookies are lightly golden brown on the underside. Working quickly, remove the baking sheet from the oven, and carefully flip each cookie over. Return to the oven and bake for another 3 to 4 minutes, or until lightly golden brown on the second side. Remove from the oven and allow to cool on the baking sheet for 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.

  • Cookies will stay fresh for about 3 days  if stored in a sealed glass container at room temperature. For longer storage, seal well in a freezer-safe container and freeze.

    Inspired by this recipe for Elephant Ears by Pepperidge Farm.

Love,
Me

 

P.S. If you haven’t yet, please pick up your copy of Bakes Bread. I’m truly so grateful for your support!

Recipe Available at: http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/gluten-free-elephant-ears-palmiers/
Gluten Free Crullers
19

I have been daydreaming about the gluten free choux pastry that we used to make the Gluten Free Cream Puffs from GFOAS Bakes Bread. We also used it to make … more »

Gluten Free Crullers

I have been daydreaming about the gluten free choux pastry that we used to make the Gluten Free Cream Puffs from GFOAS Bakes Bread. We also used it to make Gluten Free Chocolate Éclairs. I will not say I am “obsessed” with it. That is a food blogger cliché, and I am trying to keep it together over here. No one wants to be a cliché. Today, we’re making Gluten Free Crullers. Because we can. And because they are simple, and delicious. The pastry itself has zero sugar, so it is not sweet. The glaze? Well, that’s plenty sweet.

Gluten Free Crullers

Although I have made choux pastry, like, 100s of times (okay, probably more like 30 times but still that’s a lot, right?), I had never before used it to make crullers. What was I waiting for??

Gluten Free Crullers

If you’re wondering (I know you; you’re wondering), you can bake the dough instead of frying it. Bake for 15 minutes at 375°F, or until the crullers are puffed and pale golden. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and, working quickly, with a sharp knife, cut a small slit in the side of each pastry to allow steam to escape. Return the pastries on the baking sheet to the oven, turn off the oven, and prop open the oven door slightly. Allow them to sit in the oven until dry (about 30 minutes), and then glaze them. Even though they won’t be as tender, they will still be completely delicious.

Gluten Free Crullers

But I’m kind of excited about the idea of deep frying for a few reasons: 1. It’s not nearly as unhealthy as it’s generally considered (the outside of the dough is sealed quickly, so no more oil should be absorbed while the heat of the oil gently cooks the inside—unlike shallow frying, which continues oil absorption the whole time). 2. It doesn’t heat up the house like turning on the oven does. Summer’s coming, and we both know you’re gonna roll your eyes at least a little bit each time I ask you, kindly, to turn on your oven in the summer. 3. It’s ridiculous how tender and delicious fried foods can be. And I really think we need to consider making KFC-style fried chicken sometime this summer. Don’t you think?

Gluten Free Crullers

Oh, and one more thing about the choux pastry: Although the pastry fries best when it’s at or near room temperature, you can definitely make the pastry dough a few days ahead of time (I have made it as far in advance as 3 days), and store it in a well-sealed container in the refrigerator until you’re ready to use it. Pipe it into rings when it’s still cold (it does make the dough easier to pipe in pretty shapes), and then allow the dough to sit at room temperature for about 10 minutes before frying it. There are lots more tips on deep frying crullers in the recipe directions below. So let’s get started!

Prep time: 20 minutes       Cook time: 15 minutes       Yield: 12 crullers
Ingredients

1 recipe Gluten Free Cream Puffs Pastry Dough (on page 223 of GFOAS Bakes Bread, reprinted here)

1 cup (115 g) confectioners’ sugar

1 tablespoon milk (any kind), plus more by the 1/4 teaspoonful if necessary

Oil, for frying (I used a combination of equal parts canola oil and Spectrum nonhydrogenated vegetable shortening)

Directions
  • First, prepare the cream puff pastry dough (choux pastry) according to the instructions on page 223 of GFOAS Bakes Bread (reprinted here). I have tried every which way to shape the crullers so that they may be fried successfully without sacrificing their shape, and the best method is as described by Lara Ferroni in this recipe on Epicurious: place the choux pastry in a large pastry bag fitted with a 1/2-inch (13 mm) open star tip (the Ateco #826 tip is a good example). Cut 12 squares of unbleached parchment paper, each 4-inches square, and grease the squares lightly with cooking oil. Pipe the choux pastry in rings, one on each greased parchment square, closing the ring by overlapping the pastry slightly, and twisting up on the piping bag at the end. Alternatively, grease a large piece of unbleached parchment paper, pipe the rings, spaced 2 inches apart, on the paper, and then cut the parchment paper into squares, one pastry ring per square (I actually like this alternate method a bit better).

  • Make the glaze. In a small bowl, place the confectioners’ sugar and 1 tablespoon of milk. Mix well, until a thick paste forms. Add more milk by the 1/4-teaspoon, mixing to combine well, until the glaze falls off the spoon slowly, in a thick but pourable glaze. Add milk very slowly, as it is much easier to thin, than to thicken, the glaze. If you do thin the glaze too much, add more confectioners’ sugar a teaspoon at a time to thicken it.

  • Fry and glaze the crullers. In a medium-size, heavy-bottom pot or fryer, place about 3-inches of frying oil. Clip a deep-fry/candy thermometer to the side of the pot or fryer, and place the oil over medium-high heat. Bring the oil temperature to 340°F. Place the crullers one at a time in the hot oil by placing each cruller face down, still on its own piece of oiled parchment paper, in the oil. Allow to fry for a moment before carefully pulling the parchment paper off the cruller with tongs. Fry in small batches until well-puffed and lightly golden brown all over (2 to 3 minutes per side). Do not crowd the oil at all. As soon as each batch is removed from the fryer, place on paper towels to drain for only about 1 minute before dipping the top of each cruller in the glaze. Place right-side up on a wire rack to allow any excess glaze to drip off the cruller. Serve immediately.

  • Tips for deep frying crullers:

    1. Oil temperature: Keeping the oil at a constant temperature is really important. When you add each cruller to the oil, it will lower the temperature slightly. The more crullers you add at a time, the more it will lower the oil temperature. Fry in small batches. An oil temperature of 340°F proved truly optimal. It allows the crullers to cook slowly and puff completely.
    2. Choux pastry temperature: The choux pastry must be at or close to room temperature when you fry the crullers (i.e., not frozen). It is possible to freeze the raw, shaped crullers and then simply lift the shaped dough off the parchment and place it in the oil. However, the dough will not puff up completely, and the outside of the dough will cook way too fast, leaving a raw and dense inside. How did I learn this? Why, the hard way of course!
    3. Condition of frying oil: Slightly “dirty” frying oil fries more evenly and well than completely clean (virgin) frying oil. Consider the very first cruller to be a sacrificial cruller. Fry it alone. Eat it yourself. It’s the least you can do.
    4. How to reuse frying oil:  I use a batch of frying oil three times before I throw it away (unless I have fried something stinky, like fish). “Dirty” oil fries better than completely clean oil, and I hate to waste that much oil for one recipe! After I use the oil, I strain it. I wait until it’s completely cool, then strain it right back into the original (now empty) container from which the oil came. I strain it through a small mesh sieve, perched on top of a small funnel. Then, I mark the container “frying oil,” and put one hash mark on the label for each time I have used the oil. After 3 uses, I toss out the oil (back in the container and into the trash – don’t pour all that oil down your drain or you’ll clog it!).

Love,
Me

 

P.S. If you haven’t yet, please pick up your copy of Bakes Bread. I’m truly so grateful for your support!

Recipe Available at: http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/gluten-free-crullers/
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