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More Gluten Free Christmas Cookies!

More Gluten Free Christmas Cookies!

Last year, we built up and built up to the Very Best Gluten Free Christmas Cookies (So Far), and it was very exciting (for me—I can’t speak for you as that would be rude). Then, another Whole Blog Year happened. And with it, lots and lots more cookie recipes. Here, I have pulled out 6 cookie recipes from the past year that are perfect for the holiday season. Not all of them are great for packing and shipping (more on that next week), but they all are festive and perfect for impressing friends and family around the holidays. Because let’s face it: we bake cookies for other people so they think we’re awesome. Oh, kidding! (not really) Kidding (am I?).

Now these cookie recipes are pulled from the last year, but do not include our latest and greatest gluten free cookie recipes. They do not include our copycat Girl Scout Cookies (we’ll talk about those in January and February!). And that’s all just a roundabout way of saying, stay tuned! I’m gonna knock your gluten free socks off with more cookies during Gluten Free Christmas Cookie Season. With l-o-v-e.

[If you’ve been reading this blog for a while, you know the drill with the clickable collage, but just in case—hover over each photo for the recipe title, then click the picture to open a new window with that post and the entire recipe]  More Gluten Free Christmas Cookies

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Here’s the 10¢ tour of these 6 recipes for gluten free Christmas cookies and why I love each of them:

The Crispiest Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Cookies: The name says it all, right? Wrong. These are so easy it’s almost shameful to take credit for them. But do it anyway! These also make the perfect cookies for crushing and pressing into a no-bake pie crust.

Gluten Free Rocky Road Cake Mix Cookies: They start with a cake mix, and finish with freeze-dried marshmallows (which are totally worth the purchase since they are a dream in your hot chocolate all winter long). Rocky road in a cookie! Serve them over melty vanilla ice cream. Mmmmm….

Gluten Free Mrs. Fields Chocolate Chip Cookies: There are two amazing things about these cookies: 1. They are a dead ringer for Mrs. Fields classic chocolate chip cookies, all in a gluten free copycat recipe; and 2. No one threatened legal action against me for writing about them (it happens more than one might think these days when I do copycat recipes). Amazing!

Gluten Free Vanilla Wafer Sandwich Cookies: These are a personal favorite of mine. Thick filling in between two snappy little vanilla cookies makes me so happy.

Gluten Free Speculoos Cookies (Speculaas? Biscoff?): These weren’t a thing I even knew about, these cinnamony, snappy little vegan (No eggs! No butter!) cookies. But they had my attention when I learned that you could make them into cookie butter. What?! And they ship clear across the country perfectly.

Gluten Free Linzer Cookies: These are delicate little flowers of a cookie. Do not ship these. If you go through the trouble of making them, and making them gorgeous, invite your friends and family to come to your house, and serve them with some hot tea. But they are really authentic, and really worth it.

Love,
Me

 

P.S. This is it! Next Tuesday, December 10, 2013, is the official publication date of Gluten-Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread! Your gluten free life will never be the same. All kinds of excitement coming next week. Don’t miss out!! Enter The Big Giveaway! Join me for a Live Facebook Q&A about the Gluten Free Bread Revolution, and everything gluten free bread, on Tuesday at 8:30 pm EST!

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Comments are closed.

  • JessMal
    December 9, 2013 at 3:19 AM

    Hi everyone! Just jumping on this make your OWN gluten free goodies band wagon here. Cooking annoys me, baking irks me, and baking by weight absolutely terrifies me, (I don’t have time to mess it up!) But I’m sucking it up and learning a ton here (my favorite stop so far along the superhighway of gluten fee blogs!). All for the love of my little 8 year old Silly Yak who had just decided, SHE wants to bake her own GF treats. Her oldest bro helped her “convert” a wheat based cranberry bread recipe for Thanksgiving, the only way we knew how, by simply replacing the flour. They worked so hard together on that loaf. We all ate it and pretended it was just great. . .but it was terrible, and I am pretty sure she knew we were being nice, nor do i think she was very happy with it herself. I want her to know that she CAN do it! So I guess that means I’ve gotta figure it out first. . . And so I find this exquisite picture of a delicious looking gf cranberry bread! And cookies! Sooooooo many cookies! But wait, I have to create the flour blend?! Overwhelming. So I buckled down and I read your instructions more times than I’d like to admit, and finally figured it out. Ordered my numerous flours and will begrudgingly find myself a scale. . .but I still have this lingering question. . .about the white rice flour. I worry about the nutrition of that main ingredient. Brown rice flour is better, but is it “safe” to add a little coconut flour or almond flour to you’re Better’n C4C, to up the nutrition a tad, (not that cookies and treats should be the foundation of anyone’s diet, of course!) Or do I risk losing hours of my time and destroying what might have been a truly wonderful cranberry bread, (or cookies! Ooh so many cookies!) in the process?

    • December 9, 2013 at 1:55 PM

      Hi, JessMal! First of all, I love the honesty and energy behind this comment. I hear you on all counts! I mean, obviously baking does not irk me and all that, but I know that feeling of resisting something that you know you’ll eventually do. So glad you took the plunge! Now to answer your questions: 1. Brown rice flour may be “better” as far as more nutritious, but it behaves quite differently in baking. It’s like the difference between all purpose flour and whole wheat flour. They’re different. You can use my mock Better Batter blend, which has a fair amount of brown rice flour, though, if you feel better about that. 2. As far as adding some coconut flour or almond flour, I’m afraid that the answer is a resounding NO! They are completely and totally different from rice blends. But I do have a growing number of Paleo baking recipes here on the blog. Those are much more nutritionally dense, so maybe you’d like to try those. I am always adding more, too (and will be doing even more so in January). Hope that helps!

  • JessMal
    December 8, 2013 at 10:19 PM

    Hi everyone! Just jumping on this make your OWN gluten free goodies band wagon here. Cooking annoys me, baking irks me, and baking by weight absolutely terrifies me, (I don’t have time to mess it up!) But I’m sucking it up and learning a ton here (my favorite stop so far along the superhighway of gluten fee blogs!). All for the love of my little 8 year old Silly Yak who had just decided, SHE wants to bake her own GF treats. Her oldest bro helped her “convert” a wheat based cranberry bread recipe for Thanksgiving, the only way we knew how, by simply replacing the flour. They worked so hard together on that loaf. We all ate it and pretended it was just great. . .but it was terrible, and I am pretty sure she knew we were being nice, nor do i think she was very happy with it herself. I want her to know that she CAN do it! So I guess that means I’ve gotta figure it out first. . . And so I find this exquisite picture of a delicious looking gf cranberry bread! And cookies! Sooooooo many cookies! But wait, I have to create the flour blend?! Overwhelming. So I buckled down and I read your instructions more times than I’d like to admit, and finally figured it out. Ordered my numerous flours and will begrudgingly find myself a scale. . .but I still have this lingering question. . .about the white rice flour. I worry about the nutrition of that main ingredient. Brown rice flour is better, but is it “safe” to add a little coconut flour or almond flour to you’re Better’n C4C, to up the nutrition a tad, (not that cookies and treats should be the foundation of anyone’s diet, of course!) Or do I risk losing hours of my time and destroying what might have been a truly wonderful cranberry bread, (or cookies! Ooh so many cookies!) in the process?

    • December 9, 2013 at 8:55 AM

      Hi, JessMal! First of all, I love the honesty and energy behind this comment. I hear you on all counts! I mean, obviously baking does not irk me and all that, but I know that feeling of resisting something that you know you’ll eventually do. So glad you took the plunge! Now to answer your questions: 1. Brown rice flour may be “better” as far as more nutritious, but it behaves quite differently in baking. It’s like the difference between all purpose flour and whole wheat flour. They’re different. You can use my mock Better Batter blend, which has a fair amount of brown rice flour, though, if you feel better about that. 2. As far as adding some coconut flour or almond flour, I’m afraid that the answer is a resounding NO! They are completely and totally different from rice blends. But I do have a growing number of Paleo baking recipes here on the blog. Those are much more nutritionally dense, so maybe you’d like to try those. I am always adding more, too (and will be doing even more so in January). Hope that helps!

    • JessMal
      December 9, 2013 at 8:35 PM

      Yes it helps, immensely. Thank you! So stick to the plan, (uh, recipe) got it! Wait, Paleo recipes too? That’s MY special diet! You are my new favorite baker. Baking genius. Favorite baking genius. Woah now, did I just get excited about cooking? What the . . . ?! ; )

  • Wendy
    December 8, 2013 at 9:00 PM

    Just wanted to say I got your new book yesterday and I can’t wait till school is out so I can have time to read and try some recipes. The book is lovely! I love that they are finally using black print (easier on my bad eyes) and more color photos. Your books keep getting better and better. Thank you!

  • Julia
    December 8, 2013 at 8:46 PM

    Yay! I got my book! Let the baking commence! Can’t wait to get my needed extras to follow the bread book. For now I’m going to go crazy with cookies!!!

  • elayne
    December 8, 2013 at 5:26 PM

    I got your new book (pre-order) and I’ve made the baguettes but they didn’t work out too well. The starter rose great but after a night in the fridge it didn’t rise at all. I made the shapes and that rose about 20%. I put it in the oven and it rose zero during baking (I usually get a little something during baking but nothing). I’m an experienced gluten free baker for 8 years (I’ve been making your sandwich bread for a year with great success. They do taste great but they are hard and doughy inside. Thoughts?

    • December 8, 2013 at 5:43 PM

      Elayne, please refer to the troubleshooting section of the book. It sounds like your environment for the second rise wasn’t warm enough or consistent enough in temperature. Try improving that first. And bread that is hard outside and not cooked enough inside is usually due to an improperly calibrated oven. If your oven is running too hot, the outside will cook faster than the inside has a chance to cook through. It is a very well-tested recipe and will work it just may take you some time to learn how to do it in your home kitchen. For the rise, try turning on the oven and placing the rising shaped dough on top, close to the back so it benefits from the consistent ambient heat. It rose for the first rise in the refrigerator because it is a consistent temperature.

    • elayne
      December 8, 2013 at 6:33 PM

      Thanks Nicole, but it didn’t rise in the refrigerator AT ALL. Only the starter rose, from then on it didn’t. I have a thermometer in my oven and it was exactly at 375, it didn’t cook correctly because it didn’t rise. I just read the troubleshooting section so I will pay attention to those things but the biggest question I have is should it really double in size in the fridge? (I had it in there for 21 hours). Thanks again.

    • December 9, 2013 at 12:46 AM

      Doubling in size in the first rise is not necessarily essential, Elayne, since that rise is for flavor development. But I would really check your yeast. And leave it in the refrigerator for longer. Baking yeast bread in this traditional way, especially, takes patience. Good luck!

  • elayne
    December 8, 2013 at 12:26 PM

    I got your new book (pre-order) and I’ve made the baguettes but they didn’t work out too well. The starter rose great but after a night in the fridge it didn’t rise at all. I made the shapes and that rose about 20%. I put it in the oven and it rose zero during baking (I usually get a little something during baking but nothing). I’m an experienced gluten free baker for 8 years (I’ve been making your sandwich bread for a year with great success. They do taste great but they are hard and doughy inside. Thoughts?

    • December 8, 2013 at 12:43 PM

      Elayne, please refer to the troubleshooting section of the book. It sounds like your environment for the second rise wasn’t warm enough or consistent enough in temperature. Try improving that first. And bread that is hard outside and not cooked enough inside is usually due to an improperly

    • elayne
      December 8, 2013 at 1:33 PM

      Thanks Nicole, but it didn’t rise in the refrigerator AT ALL. Only the starter rose, from then on it didn’t. I have a thermometer in my oven and it was exactly at 375, it didn’t cook correctly because it didn’t rise. I just read the troubleshooting section so I will pay attention to those things but the biggest question I have is should it really double in size in the fridge? (I had it in there for 21 hours). Thanks again.

    • December 8, 2013 at 3:34 PM

      If it didn’t rise at all in the refrigerator, which is not at all what I understood you to say previously, then please refer back to the troubleshooting section. It could be your yeast. I have never had that particular experience. If it isn’t that, the first rise is mostly for flavor development through yeast development, and doubling in size isn’t essential. It would be worth it to leave it in the refrigerator for longer. But focus on your yeast and a better second rise.

    • December 8, 2013 at 7:46 PM

      Doubling in size in the first rise is not necessarily essential, Elayne, since that rise is for flavor development. But I would really check your yeast. And leave it in the refrigerator for longer. Baking yeast bread in this traditional way, especially, takes patience. Good luck!

  • Jackie Fretwell
    December 7, 2013 at 12:26 PM

    I have a question about the expandex modifies tapioca starch, is that the same as regular tapioca starch or is it a completely different item? Thanks so much!

    • December 7, 2013 at 1:02 PM

      Jackie, yes it is a completely different ingredient. There is a fair amount of information about it in the new book. Please also see this page on the blog.

    • December 7, 2013 at 6:02 PM

      Jackie, yes it is a completely different ingredient. There is a fair amount of information about it in the new book. Please also see this page on the blog.

  • Jennifer
    December 6, 2013 at 10:05 PM

    Nicole, please, please, please do some more bread shaping videos on facebook. :)

    I’ve been baking bread since I was 9 and I feel so stupid for not being able to understand some of the shaping. Specifically the rolls. Here in rural route our grannies just teach us to pinch off pieces of dough…roll it between our hands and place in the pan. :)

    • LyttleO
      December 7, 2013 at 12:11 PM

      Yes! I 2nd this motion, except rather on facebook put it on youtube. Thank you Jennifer for pointing out the video. Not having a FB account i wasn’t aware it even existed. =]

    • December 7, 2013 at 12:55 PM

      Don’t worry, LyttleO. I posted it to my sparsely-populated youtube.com channel. The quality isn’t great, but you get the idea: Shaping Gluten Free Pizza Dough.

    • Adaptagirl
      December 7, 2013 at 12:56 PM

      I just got my copy of Bakes Bread, and there are lots of pictures of bread shaping in there.

    • December 7, 2013 at 1:01 PM

      Hi, Jennifer, I will definitely do some more videos. Like the first one, they will not be well-produced (since that would take time + resources I just can’t spare right now!), but like the first they will give you the drift! About shaping round rolls, I assume you already looked at the step by step photos in the early chapters of the book? The idea is to create surface tension on the top of the roll so that it rises smoothly and creates a true round shape. You might have success just rolling dough between your hands, so definitely give that a try (and I know you’re not against experimenting! your Ultratex experimentation and reporting has been really helpful!). But just keep in mind that the idea is to stretch the dough gently across the top to create that surface tension on top. But stay tuned for a video … hopefully by publication date (this coming Tuesday Dec. 10). ;)

    • Jennifer
      December 7, 2013 at 11:13 PM

      Thanks, Nicole. I have looked at all the pics and somehow I’m still not getting the roll shaping. I think I just need to see it in action for it to all click. I thought your pizza video was perfect for letting us see what it should look like. I know I would much rather be able to see the dough in action than see or hear a bunch of fancy bells and whistles. :)

      My Expandex is stuck in transit because of the weather. I’ve been trying to hold off my experimenting til I get it and can make a batch ‘as written / tested’ so I’ll know exactly what it should feel and look like. I’m thinking Ultratex 8 might be just a little too strong. Everything I’ve made has been great straight out of the oven but I’m still getting some tightness once it cools. But really as a testament to how good this bread is…I forgot to hold back one of the mini ciabatta rolls so I could see how it held up the next day and when I went back a couple hours later they were all completely gone.

      Where I first saw Ultratex was on the Food Network show Chopped. A guy used it to thicken a sauce in a blender. He was using Ultratex 3 and it looked like he used a big heaping tbsp of U3 to thicken half the blender full of liquid. He made a nice thick sauce (like cream gravy consistency). I tried that with the U8 and I got closer to pudding consistency with a heaping half tbsp. So I think U8 is definitely twice as strong as U3.

      (Sorry that was so long but thought it might be helpful for anyone else wanting to experiment with those products)

    • Wendy
      December 8, 2013 at 4:00 PM

      Just wanted to say I got your new book yesterday and I can’t wait till school is out so I can have time to read and try some recipes. The book is lovely! I love that they are finally using black print (easier on my bad eyes) and more color photos. Your books keep getting better and better. Thank you!

    • December 7, 2013 at 6:01 PM

      Hi, Jennifer, I will definitely do some more videos. Like the first one, they will not be well-produced (since that would take time + resources I just can’t spare right now!), but like the first they will give you the drift! About shaping round rolls, I assume you already looked at the step by step photos in the early chapters of the book? The idea is to create surface tension on the top of the roll so that it rises smoothly and creates a true round shape. You might have success just rolling dough between your hands, so definitely give that a try (and I know you’re not against experimenting! your Ultratex experimentation and reporting has been really helpful!). But just keep in mind that the idea is to stretch the dough gently across the top to create that surface tension on top. But stay tuned for a video … hopefully by publication date (this coming Tuesday Dec. 10). ;)

    • Jennifer
      December 8, 2013 at 4:13 AM

      Thanks, Nicole. I have looked at all the pics and somehow I’m still not getting the roll shaping. I think I just need to see it in action for it to all click. I thought your pizza video was perfect for letting us see what it should look like. I know I would much rather be able to see the dough in action than see or hear a bunch of fancy bells and whistles. :)

      My Expandex is stuck in transit because of the weather. I’ve been trying to hold off my experimenting til I get it and can make a batch ‘as written / tested’ so I’ll know exactly what it should feel and look like. I’m thinking Ultratex 8 might be just a little too strong. Everything I’ve made has been great straight out of the oven but I’m still getting some tightness once it cools. But really as a testament to how good this bread is…I forgot to hold back one of the mini ciabatta rolls so I could see how it held up the next day and when I went back a couple hours later they were all completely gone.

      Where I first saw Ultratex was on the Food Network show Chopped. A guy used it to thicken a sauce in a blender. He was using Ultratex 3 and it looked like he used a big heaping tbsp of U3 to thicken half the blender full of liquid. He made a nice thick sauce (like cream gravy consistency). I tried that with the U8 and I got closer to pudding consistency with a heaping half tbsp. So I think U8 is definitely twice as strong as U3.

      (Sorry that was so long but thought it might be helpful for anyone else wanting to experiment with those products)

  • RW
    December 6, 2013 at 9:33 PM

    I have yet to make a cookie from any of your recipes that wasn’t delicious but my FAV has got to be the thick and chewy choc chip. Made them for my daughter’s kindergarten class for a party so she could eat what everyone else had and the entire batch was devoured and the teachers were begging for them again.

    • December 7, 2013 at 12:56 PM

      Oh don’t you just love bringing your gluten free cookies and stealing the whole show, RW? That is the best feeling. Those have been a favorite in my family for about 10 years. So glad you love them, too!

  • michelle
    December 6, 2013 at 7:21 PM

    You are an angel yes?? Your ideas are so fresh and sound tasty. Guess I better head to the kitchen!1

  • Candice
    December 6, 2013 at 1:48 PM

    The linzer cookies are already on my list. They are calling to me. Thinking those speculoos might have to be added!

    Made your gum-free pancakes for dinner last night for my two daughters. There are very few things they will both eat for dinner and one of them is pancakes. They were so very happy with pancakes for dinner:) And they were so easy to whip up. I even made them dairy free! Happy kiddos = happy mommy!

    • December 7, 2013 at 12:58 PM

      That’s awesome about the pancakes, Candice! And going on the assumption that you’re very same Candice from Facebook who recently had tremendous success with the Lean Crusty White Sandwich Bread from the new book … thank you so much for posting about that! That means so much to me, and I’m so happy your 4 year old little girl loved it, too!

  • Jennifer S.
    December 6, 2013 at 10:24 AM

    I do not know how I’ve missed the vanilla sandwich cookies. Yum-o! I might have to add ’em to the list for this year!!! I love it when you do these collage deal-e-o’s and make it so easy for us!! you’re the best!

    • December 7, 2013 at 12:58 PM

      Right back atcha, Jennifer. You’re the bestest. :)

    • December 7, 2013 at 5:58 PM

      Right back atcha, Jennifer. You’re the bestest. :)

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