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Sandwich Bread

Sandwich Bread

Tom’s Gluten Free Sandwich Bread

UPDATE: I published this recipe for gluten free sandwich bread in 2009, only a few months after I started this blog. I haven’t made this recipe in many, many years, and this bread recipe breaks every single rule I have come to embrace over the years about baking gluten free. It uses bean flour, is a batter bread, and really just “good, for gluten free.” But all the same, I can’t bring myself to delete it from this blog. It was a true beacon to me in those early years, when there was little to hope for in gluten free baking.

The Original Post From 2009

This is not my recipe. I have used it for years, & it is heaven sent. But it is most decidedly not mine. It was created by a man named Tom Van Deman, and he provided it, selflessly, to everyone who asked. I always have at least one loaf of it in the freezer and one in the refrig. It is a stand-by, a must-have, my ace in the hole. I use it for my kids’ school lunches. I use it for french toast. I use it for a pillow at night, and I have sweet, sweet dreams.

Many of you have sent me emails asking if I could recommend a recipe for sandwich bread. Most of the commercially available gluten free breads are, well, blech. The ones that are good, it seems, are way too expensive to serve as a staple. And that just won’t do. In any event, Tom’s Bread is actually quite easy to make, freezes beautifully, & can be sliced as thin as you like. When it’s freshly made, you need not toast it. When it’s not, just toast a couple slices & you’ll revive it in two shakes. I make lots of other breads, but this is my go-to sandwich bread. I bet it’ll be yours, too.

Tom’s Bread
Ingredients
1 1/8 cup chickpea (garbanzo bean) flour
1 cup cornstarch
1 cup + 1 tablespoon tapioca flour
3 1/2 teaspoons xanthan gum
1 1/2 teaspoons salt
3 tablespoons brown sugar
1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar
2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast
3 eggs, beaten
1 1/8 cup hot (not boiling) water
3 tablespoons vegetable oil

1. Combine all dry ingredients in a medium size bowl (or stand mixer bowl), including the yeast. Mix thoroughly on medium setting.

2. In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs, warm water and oil until well combined. Pour these wet ingredients into the bowl with the dry ingredients, and mix on medium speed (with paddle or dough hook, if using stand mixer). When a (sticky) ball begins to form, scrape the sides of the bowl and mix for 1 additional minute. The dough will still be sticky. It’s fine.

3. Scrape the dough into a greased 9″x5″ loaf pan. Cover with plastic wrap, set in a draft-free warm spot and let rise about 60 minutes, until doubled in size. Near the end of the rise, preheat the oven to 375 degrees.

4. Remove the plastic wrap and place the pan in the preheated oven. Bake for 35-40 minutes, or until the loaf sounds hollow when tapped with a spoon. Turn the loaf out onto a wire rack and cool completely. Slice and enjoy. Thank me later.

Warmly,
Nicole

If you liked this recipe, you'll love my new book!

Gluten-Free on a Shoestring [Second Edition]:

125 Easy Recipes for Eating Well on the Cheap

Amazon.com Barnes & Noble IndieBound.com

Comments are closed.

  • Nicola
    July 1, 2011 at 12:23 AM

    Hi :-) I’m trying out this recipe for the first time in my breadmaker, with soy flour instead of the chickpea, as I was given a bunch of flours from a friend. Can’t wait to see how it turns out , that is if my machine co-operates……….. I seriously think the darn thing may be possessed……… it seems to mix the dough for a while, then get bored and reset itself. Wish me luck!

    • Nicola
      July 1, 2011 at 1:39 AM

      After the machine reset itself for the umpteenth time, I scooped the mixture out of the pan and decided to mix it with my handbeater. The mixture then decided to wind it’s way up the beaters in a big lump, well that obviously wasn’t going to work….. then I scraped it off the poor beater and back into the breadmaker, which only started to work the way it should after I posted for advice on the manufacturer’s Facebook page (that was weird, did it know I was telling on it?!?) Now it’s happily rising away in my machine, although I probably lost a good amount of the dough in the process, should be interesting to see how it turns out. Next time I might stick to something nice and non-threatening like biscuits or muffins. :-)
      :-)

    • Nicola
      July 1, 2011 at 8:07 PM

      And after all that, it turned out really really good! Thanks for sharing the recipe :-)

    • Nicole
      July 1, 2011 at 9:10 PM

      Hi, Nicola,
      I’m glad it worked out!
      xoxo Nicole

  • Michelle
    June 3, 2011 at 9:14 PM

    I think someone asked about using egg replacer, but I didn’t see any followup from the person who asked, so I figured I’d give it a shot. I made the recipe as written, but with Ener-G Egg Replacer for the three eggs. I used my bread maker and I’m very happy with the way it turned out. It is probably a little more dense than it would have been with real eggs, but it tastes great, sliced up nice and thin, and is not crumbly at all. I think it may be my new favorite sandwich bread!

    Someone also asked about nutritional information. Because of all my wonderful allergies, I track all my foods to make sure I’m getting what I need every day. When I sit down and figure out all the values for a loaf of this bread, I’ll post them here.

    Thanks for sharing this recipe, Nicole! I’d be totally lost without resources like your blog and cookbook.

  • Mary
    May 11, 2011 at 7:36 PM

    Hi Nicole,

    I was wondering, can I make this bread using the Better Batter flour? It looks almost the same as your White Sandwich Bread except it has Brown Sugar which sounds wonderful. Do you still make this?

    Thanks,
    Mary

    • Nicole
      May 12, 2011 at 9:20 AM

      Hi, Mary,
      This isn’t my recipe, and I have never modified it at all. It is not the same as my White Sandwich Bread recipe, but you could definitely use brown sugar in my White Sandwich Bread recipe instead of granulated sugar. I hope that’s helpful!
      xoxo
      Nicole

  • RaincloudDance
    April 8, 2011 at 12:32 AM

    Ooops I live in the UK so there is a time difference. I’m closing now at UK time 01:32. Best wishes.

  • RaincloudDance
    April 8, 2011 at 12:28 AM

    Hi everyone
    I have just found this site 8th April 2011 at 1am. I have looked through all the comments and have found the reading very interesting. I am looking forward to making the sandwich bread. It’s no fun eating gluten free bread which has been bought from the store. It is impossible to make a sandwich with it. So wish me luck and I’ll pop back to the site one day. Many thanks

    • Nicole
      April 8, 2011 at 1:59 AM

      I wish you luck, for sure, RaincloudDance! It will turn out beautifully, though, don’t worry.

      Warm regards,
      Nicole

  • Michelle
    August 31, 2010 at 2:46 PM

    Thank you Thank you Thank you!!! We LOVE this bread and the recipe is sooo easy too. My husband hadn’t liked any sandwich bread until this, now I always try to have some made (or in the freezer).

    • Nicole
      September 2, 2010 at 2:40 PM

      Hi, Michelle,
      I’m so glad you are enjoying this bread. It’s a keeper! Thank you for posting!
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • Em
    July 9, 2010 at 12:00 AM

    WOW! I’ve made this loaf twice now and I can barely believe how perfect it is. GF Sandwich bread was impossible, I thought! This stuff is soft, cuts easily, tastes great (but mild enough not to take over fillings) and almost cleans up after itself too coz it rocks so much lol
    Thank you so much for sharing this recipe!

    • Nicole
      July 14, 2010 at 7:28 PM

      Hi, Em,
      I know. This recipe is amazing. I only wish I had come up with it myself! Thanks for posting, and I’m so glad you’re enjoying the bread.
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • […] super delicious served on top of a juicy grilled summertime hamburger, on a homemade bun made with Tom’s Light Bread. Just like regular, gluten-eatin’ folk (but better — what do they […]

  • Genevieve
    June 30, 2010 at 6:36 PM

    Hello! Your sandwich bread recipe is exactly what I’m looking for: great taste, straight forward and minimal ingredients required! The only issue is that we cannot do corn at all…please don’t hesitate to share if you have another wonderful, sandwich bread recipe to share!
    My regular one is a pain to make as I require about 25 different ingredients!
    Merci beaucoup!
    Regards,

    Genevieve

    • Nicole
      July 1, 2010 at 2:35 PM

      Hi, Genevieve,
      Oh no! 25 different ingredients? That seems barely worth the trouble, at best! I am a home cook, not a pastry chef, so I like to keep it as simple as possible. I do have another few recipes for excellent gf bread, but they’re in the cookbook, so I can’t share them yet! The book should be on shelves early next year! In the meantime, please enjoy this bread and look for the book in the winter!!
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • […] sure that David had plenty of options to chose from. So I made him some gf rolls that he loves (http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/sandwich-bread/) just turning the loaf of bread into rolls that I baked for 20ish minutes after lightly wiping them […]

  • Kris
    March 23, 2010 at 1:27 AM

    Hi Nicole,
    I was just wondering if you have any idea about the nutritional information of a slice of this bread…calories, carbs., protein, et cetera? Just curious.

    • Nicole
      April 1, 2010 at 4:43 PM

      Hi, Kris,
      Unfortunately, I don’t. It’s not my recipe, but even if it were, I’d have no idea, to be honest! I’m sorry! Because of the flours used, I would have to imagine it has a lot of protein. Sorry!
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • Kim
    January 26, 2010 at 6:54 PM

    P.S I used my stand mixer to make this bread and baked it in a loaf pan in the oven. It still came out perfect!

  • Kim
    January 26, 2010 at 6:52 PM

    I just made this bread and OMG it is sooo good! I didn’t have any garbanzo bean flour or tapioca flour so I used Bob’s Red Mill gf all purpose flour and baking soda in place of the cream of tartar and it still came out amazing. I am so happy to have bread in the house again and not have to pay an arm and a leg for it. LOL

    • Nicole
      January 27, 2010 at 6:26 PM

      Hi, Kim,
      I’m so glad you had such a good experience with this recipe. It sustained me and my family for many years. I am developing a whole bunch of new sandwich bread recipes for the book, so you’ll have lots of options! Thanks for posting that you were able to substitute flours and still get a good result.
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • don
    January 3, 2010 at 6:04 PM

    tapioca flour at oriental grocery store is from .59 to 1.00 for 1 pound . also non wheat noodles. and i have a question my bread is the greatest. but it falls a little when i take it out of the oven. would you list all the things that make them fall. also the ingredients in egg replacer also helps to hold the air bubbles in the bread. thank you DON

    • Nicole
      January 5, 2010 at 3:41 PM

      Hi, Don,
      If your bread rises well in the oven but then falls, it probably has too much moisture. Try cutting back on the water in the bread, bit by bit. You’ll find the sweet spot.
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • Jane
    December 14, 2009 at 1:42 PM

    This bread is a hit in my house BUT due to some weeks having a smaller food budget, I wonder if I can substitute the flours, half the recipe and half Bob’s RM All-Purpose? The tapioca starch/garbanzo flours is really expensive but with school lunches and a hubby who loves the bread with a passion, I find four loaves a week is the norm. Has there been any info about that? I also don’t have a bread machine since I don’t like the shape the loaf is when done baking in one. Thanks! Great recipe!

    • Nicole
      December 16, 2009 at 2:46 AM

      Hi, Jane,
      See if you can skim the comments to this recipe. In some of the more recent comments, other readers have said that they substituted flours with success. Give it a try! I understand what you mean about the cost. Four loaves of bread a week is a lot! I use it for all my kids’ lunches, but my husband doesn’t get near it! He gets hot lunches, since that’s cheaper and he has access to a microwave at work.
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • Sandra
    December 12, 2009 at 3:05 AM

    I made this bread using soy flour instead of bean flour using an old bread machine that doesn’t have a gluten free setting. Due to these slight modifications, I was worried how it would come out, but it came out just perfectly! Not at all dry, flaky or dense. So delicious and easy to make in the bread maker, and much cheaper and tastier than store-bought GF breads. Very happy! :-)

    • Nicole
      December 16, 2009 at 2:47 AM

      Hi, Sandra,
      That’s great! It’s magic bread. :)
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • Wendy
    December 10, 2009 at 1:51 PM

    Nicole – the only place I was planning on displaying the “book” I was intending on making was on my own bookshelf. Wasn’t planning to splurge on much beyond a staple, as my means of binding….. So it is probably good that you take care of this one ;)

  • Christina
    December 9, 2009 at 8:31 PM

    I started out using the Pamela’s bread recipe and it was good — much better than store bought; I was very overwhelmed when we first learned my husband has Celiac, so this recipe was extra simple and worked for a while.

    But I took the time to buy all of the things needed for this recipe, and it was well worth the effort. I made it for my husband last night, and he loves it; it’s more than good. This really doesn’t take much more effort than the other recipe, but it is much better. Thank you for sharing and good luck with your book.
    Christina

    • Nicole
      December 16, 2009 at 2:52 AM

      Hi, Christina,
      It is amazing how your perspective can change as you climb and finally overcome the big learning curve of cooking and baking gluten free, isn’t it? The things I thought were “good” when we first started out gluten-free were a reflection of how overwhelmed I was, and how thrilled I was to find anything that tasted like food! I’m so glad you’re enjoying the recipe. Eat it in good health!
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • Jennifer
    December 7, 2009 at 8:48 PM

    Hi Nicole!

    I think I got it! I only used 2 extra large eggs, and cut down on the water. I baked a lovely loaf of bread! Thanks for your help!

    • Nicole
      December 9, 2009 at 1:15 AM

      Hi, Jennifer,
      Hooray! I’m so glad. I’m sure you have many more lovely loaves of bread in your future! I’m so glad you kept trying.
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • Catherine
    December 3, 2009 at 3:01 PM

    I’m so glad to hear you’re putting a book together, Nicole! Consider my order placed.
    I have a little note to add about this great sandwich bread. After making it religiously, and successfully, since August, 2009, yesterday for the first time I tried something slightly different. For half of the garbanzo bean flour, I substituted amaranth flour (because I’d bought some, I’ve read it’s nutritious, and I was just curious). The bread came out beautifully, perhaps slightly denser than usual — so one would definitely not want to use too much of this amaranth — and a bit sweeter and more interesting tasting. MOST IMPORTANT: the texture of the crumb is changed to more sturdy and stretchable-without-crumbling, making it even more useful for sandwiches. If you’re already making this bread and thus have all the stuff on hand, this, I think, is a worthwhile tweak to try.
    Thanks, as always, Nicole! This is the only “blog” I’ve ever read, and it’s just so darned useful!
    Catherine

    • Nicole
      December 5, 2009 at 12:10 AM

      Hi, Catherine,
      Thank you for the tip. The bread sounds amazing. I will have to try that. I have never fooled around with Tom’s recipe one iota, but I’m glad to hear that you did!
      Thanks for the kind words about the book. :)
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • Wendy
    December 3, 2009 at 2:45 PM

    You just made my day! THAT is a book I would buy. In fact, I’ve contemplated compiling my own book from the recipes you’ve posted here!

    • Nicole
      December 5, 2009 at 12:11 AM

      Hi, Wendy,
      Thank you for your enthusiasm about the book. I guess it’s a good thing that I mentioned it, or you’d beat me to the shelves with my recipes!
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • Jennifer
    November 30, 2009 at 1:40 PM

    Nicole!

    Thank you for getting back to me! I made another load yesterday, and it is so flat! It is the worst one yet, but still yummy!

    The batter is very think and sticky, but is not stiff. It is more “gloppy” than stiff. It does not make a ball. I used my stand mixer, once with the dough hook, and once with the paddle. Perhaps I should add the water in slowly and stop when it is becoming a ball? Also, I realized that I am using extra large eggs, is that too much egginess? How high should I let it rise? When I fill the loaf pan with the batter, it is half full. Shoud it be level with the pan or more? I am actually a great cook, so this is frustrating me! Any help would be welcome! Thank you in advance!

    • Nicole
      December 3, 2009 at 12:30 AM

      Jennifer! You need a yeast bread intervention.
      Definitely do not use the dough hook. And beat the mixture for a long time with the paddle attachment. That activates the xanthan gum, which is what forms something of a net to catch the bubbles the yeast creates during the rising. You should try adding the water slowly, and erring on the side of less. It should be stiff. It would definitely be too sticky to handle, but stiff. Sometimes the problem can be that it is rising too long, but it doesn’t sound like that is what you are experiencing. And how big is your pan? Gluten free batter is heavier than conventional flour, so the dough is heavier. It does best in a slightly smaller loaf pan, say 81/2″x41/2″, for example.
      Keep me posted. Email me for some one on one attention, if you’d prefer.
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • […] in the presentation, with no more than a modicum of effort.  I took a couple of thick slices of Tom’s Sandwich Bread, buttered each side of the bread and then topped the butter with a generous layer of cranberry […]

  • Jennifer
    November 28, 2009 at 8:50 PM

    Hello Nicole!

    The taste of this bread is so great! But I’m having trouble with the texture. Your photo of the Turkey sandwich has me wondering. My bread does not look like that! I am following the exact recipe, doing the rise in the oven(set at 200 for 5 minutes, then turn off) for an hour, then baking for 40 minutes. During the baking process, it rises beautifully! When it cools, it falls and is very moist. I have made 2 loafs, and they are definitely edible, but are very heavy and moist. Do you think I need to cook it longer?

    • Nicole
      November 29, 2009 at 4:34 PM

      Hi, Jennifer,
      I’m glad you posted. I’m sure we can troubleshoot this. Yeast bread is very sensitive to environmental conditions, so sometimes you need to tweak things. A loaf that rises but then falls almost always has too much moisture. The batter should be very thick and sticky, and sort of stiff. What does your batter look like?
      Don’t worry. We’ll figure it out.
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • Michele Hamilton
    November 28, 2009 at 7:00 PM

    Thanks so much for the wonderful bread recipe! I’ve tried several different recipes and had almost given up until I stumbled across this one. We finished off the first loaf as French toast this morning, and I’ve got our second loaf rising right now. This will be added to our “staples” recipes.

    • Nicole
      November 29, 2009 at 4:32 PM

      Hi, Michele,
      I’m so glad you are having a lot of success with this bread. There’s nothing like a reliable bread recipe. Thank for posting!
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • Wendy
    November 24, 2009 at 2:38 AM

    Hey Nicole – would you consider writing a blog entry with some of the basic GF cooking tips? ie:
    Tapioca flour = tapioca starch
    Xanthan gum need to be aerated (I never knew that)
    What does “hot water” mean in GF cooking?
    A word or two about flour blends??… I saw you were using Bob’s Red Mill, now you’re using something different? Why? Is it cheaper? Better?

    I’m a scientist by training, and approach cooking the same way….for better or worse. The more I understand, the better success I will have!

    Thanks for this blog! Wish I would have found it months ago! I recommended it to our CSA Group’s communications director to include in the next newsletter.

    Thanks again for all that you do!

    Wendy

    • Nicole
      December 3, 2009 at 12:35 AM

      Hi, Wendy,
      I apologize for taking so long to get back to you in reply to this comment of yours. I think a post with some basic guidelines like you suggest is a great idea. I haven’t announced this yet officially on the blog, but I am in the process of writing a Gluten-Free on a Shoestring book, and it should be in stores by January 2011. So it might take me a little longer than usual to get to a post like that, but it’s on my list. I promise! Thank you for the kind words, and for all your comments. I think the comments are as important as the recipes/posts themselves, you know?
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • Nicole
    November 23, 2009 at 9:39 PM

    Hi, Catherine,
    I’m so pleased that this bread has made things easier and more enjoyable for you. That’s so important. It really does go a long way in maintaining or regaining a sense of normalcy. Thank you for keeping me posted on your progress!
    Warmly,
    Nicole

  • Catherine
    November 23, 2009 at 1:02 AM

    And since I see you’re talking about your/my favorite bread (two loaves of which are cooling on the kitchen table as a write), let me say that I get a really good rise every time, and I use only a pastry cutter (to make sure the brown sugar gets properly broken up) and a wooden spoon for mixing. It’s requires a bit of muscle, but it works! Occasionally, my husband says, “Shouldn’t we really try some other recipes, just to see?” But I’ve looked at them, and they don’t seem as sensible as this one. (How many egg whites?!)
    I am definitely giving thanks for this bread. It has made the transition to celiac life so very much easier.

  • Nicole
    November 22, 2009 at 12:33 AM

    Hi, Wendy,
    I completely understand why you’re so excited. It’s very exciting when you hit it just right! The Kitchen Aid is really helpful in reliably turning out a loaf of gluten free yeast bread. When the xanthan gum is properly activated, it is ready to “catch” the bubbles the yeast creates (that’s also the function of gluten in conventional yeast baking, and that’s why you knead gluten-containing yeast bread dough).
    Hot water means about 110 degrees. Too hot and you could kill the yeast. Too cold and the yeast won’t rise (or will rise very slowly). No need to boil the water.
    I hope that’s helpful. Keep up the good work!
    Warmly,
    Nicole

  • Wendy
    November 22, 2009 at 12:09 AM

    Just got a Kitchen Aid today…. My bread is in the oven – best attempt yet. It REALLY REALLY ROSE!!!!!!!

    Question on “hot water”, since you’re such a proficient teacher….

    What exactly does “hot water” mean? I understand water needs to be hotter than when cooking with regular flour, but I don’t know how hot.

    What I”ve been doing is heating water in the microwave until boiling. Letting it cool just a little bit, and then mixing it in…..so it is probably still 200 degrees. It seems to be working, but I am always looking to improve on my technique.

    Thanks Nicole – I think I Cyber-Love you :)

  • Wendy
    November 18, 2009 at 1:09 PM

    You are divinely forgiven – as if I was even upset to begin with.

    As you well know, this GF cooking gig has a fairly steep learning curve. Just trying to get the ‘facts, ma’am’, so I can build on my successes and get back to a totally normal way of life.

    Incidentally, the last loaf of bread I made killed my hand mixer. Motor overheated and is now DOA. Time to get a nice mixer…..silver linings, right?

    • Nicole
      November 20, 2009 at 1:51 AM

      Hi, Wendy,
      Thank you for forgiving so readily. :) Yes, it’s a steep learning curve, for sure. It’s like learning another language. But you are clearly well on your way over that curve. Oh, and I’m not really surprised that your hand mixer died. Gluten free flours are significantly heavier than their conventional counterparts, so you need a hard-working mixer. Where in baking with gluten you have to be careful not to overwork the gluten, in gluten-free baking, you need to mix very well to activate the xanthan gum and to aerate the product, which helps it rise. Look for a Kitchen Aid on sale. They’re the best!
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • Wendy
    November 18, 2009 at 3:52 AM

    Nicole – are you sure about the tapioca starch vs. flour? Before I went shopping, I called around town and no one had tapioca flour. Then I talked to the owner of the local natural/bulk foods store and he said they were the same thing.

    Due to my skeptical nature, I Googled it. Every reference I can find says they are the same thing. (Now potato starch and potato flour are distinctly different, as are corn starch vs. corn flour).

    I only bring this up because I am still new in the world of GF cooking and want to do my best to learn.

    Thanks for educating me! :)

    • Nicole
      November 18, 2009 at 12:32 PM

      Hi, Wendy

      I’m so sorry I sent you on a wild goose chase! I was thinking of potato flour and potato starch, as you suspected. You are absolutely right. My husband saw your post and called me out, too. Can you ever forgive me? Thank you so much for posting back and correcting me. I wouldn’t want anyone else to have to chase their tail! :)

      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • Nicole
    November 18, 2009 at 3:13 AM

    Oh, and Wendy, tapioca flour is not the same thing as tapioca starch! Different products….

    Warmly,
    Nicole

  • Nicole
    November 18, 2009 at 3:12 AM

    Hi, Wendy,
    That’s great! I’m glad to know that it was comparable with the all purpose flour blends. It’s good to know, in case you’re ever in a pinch. Once you get used to having fresh baked bread, you can’t go back to prepared breads. You just can’t…. Thanks for letting us know how it turned out!
    Warmly,
    Nicole

  • Wendy
    November 17, 2009 at 5:43 PM

    Next try – the right ingredients.

    Is tapioca flour = tapioca starch???

    Thanks!

  • Nicole
    November 16, 2009 at 6:53 PM

    Hi, Wendy,
    It sounds like you had some measure of success, even with different flours. I have never varied this recipe at all. It’s not mine, and it seems like it has some sort of supernatural magic just as is. You’re brave! I’m glad your 4 year old liked it, though!
    Warmly,
    Nicole

  • Wendy
    November 15, 2009 at 9:17 PM

    Hi Nicole – I took my first stab at this recipe today. It didn’t rise quite as much as I hoped, but tast is the true test. I admit that I was impatient (I usually am) and didn’t buy the individual flour/starch components. I used about 2.25 cups of Bob’s Red Mill flour blend and 1 cup of Grandma Ferdon’s Flour Blend.

    My 4 year old (he’s not GF, just me) and I just sat down and had a slice straight out of the oven and he said, “Momma, you make the best bread.” It is good.

    Now I’ll have to buy the right ingredients and try again.

  • Carol
    November 6, 2009 at 2:30 AM

    I have a breadman pro bread machine. Do you have to put in all the wet ingredients first. There are gluten free bread recipes that came with the machine, and they all call for putting in the wet ingredients first. I have never used it and would like to make this bread in the machine. It looks so scrumptuous.
    Carol

    • Nicole
      November 9, 2009 at 7:50 PM

      Hi, Carol,
      When we make this recipe in our bread machine, we put the wet ingredients in first, then the dry ingredients (EXCEPT the yeast) on top of the wet ingredients. Next, create a small well in the dry ingredients with a spoon and place the yeast in the well. Then turn on the machine and sit back and wait for your bread.
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • Amy K
    November 5, 2009 at 4:00 PM

    Hey thanks jlemke for the great ideas!!!

  • jlemke
    October 30, 2009 at 3:40 AM

    You can use buckwheat, teff, quinoa, almond, lentil, or soy as a substitute for chickpea flour. If you don’t want the chickpea flour tasting so bean-like you can toast the flour dry in a pan over medium-low heat till the aroma smells better, almost nutty.

  • October 18, 2009 at 3:50 AM

    I was also wondering if anyone has tried a different flour(not chickpea). I had bought some in the past and ended up throwing it out because I never used it (I kept it for a few years and gave up). Maybe Sheila and I should both try it with a substitute and report back.

    • Nicole
      October 20, 2009 at 5:25 PM

      Hi, Brenda,
      I would love it if someone were brave enough to substitute in another flour to replace the chickpea. I would suggest something with a good protein content. Let us know if you try!
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • Nicole
    October 4, 2009 at 5:50 PM

    Hi, Annette,
    I’m so glad you loved the bread. It’s magic bread!

    Hi, Sheila,
    I’m honestly not sure. This is not my recipe, and I have never made any substitutions in it at all. I know that Tom, the creator of the recipe, grinds his own chickpea flour. Maybe you could try that? I’m sorry I can’t be of more help!

    Warmly,
    Nicole

  • October 4, 2009 at 11:55 AM

    I have every flour but chickpea, can I substitute? I’m also making it in a bread maker…. first time.

  • Annette Bloss
    October 4, 2009 at 1:21 AM

    Dear Nicole,
    Thank you so much for this recipe. I have a son-in-law, sister, friend, and potential grandchildren who have to eat gluten free. I made this for my friend and she loved it and so did I and my husband. Actually it is the best bread I’ve ever made bar none.
    Annette

  • Nicole
    September 21, 2009 at 1:07 PM

    Hi, Jamie,
    Thanks for posting. Yes, it is normal for it to fall a bit after baking, but it should not fall so much that it becomes dense. One thing to check is how big (specifically, how long) the pan in which you are making it is. Gluten free dough is heavier than conventional bread, so it’s best if you bake it in a slightly shorter pan – 8″x5″ or smaller. That seems to help quite a bit.
    I hope that’s helpful!

    Hi, Toni,
    You really just need enough sugar to feed the yeast. Half is fine (as you saw for yourself)! You are very welcome. Thank you for posting. Keep reading!

    Warmly,
    Nicole

  • Toni
    September 21, 2009 at 12:04 AM

    Thank you so much for this recipe! I have been GF for a few months and just this past weekend decided to try and make some bread. It is SO good! I did alter the recipe a bit on the second loaf (my non-gf hubby downed the first loaf) by adding just one spoon of sugar just b.c we thought it as a bit sweet. It turned out just as tasty as the first! Thanks again for your time and dedication in putting all of these wonderful recipes up on your site!

    As ever,

    Toni

  • Jamie
    September 19, 2009 at 11:20 PM

    Hello!

    I have made two batches of this lovely bread… However, I have had some problems. Each time I have made it (and I make it exactly according to the directions) it rises very well in the oven – yet, when it cools, it shrinks. Is this normal? Should I be adding baking soda? I have been cooking for my fiancé for years and would like to perfect my performance! He loves the taste of this bread – but I am disappointed with the reduced size…

    Any suggestions?

    Thanks so much,
    Jamie

  • Nicole
    September 16, 2009 at 12:19 AM

    Hi, Mary Kay,
    I hope you have better luck. Yeast bread is sometimes temperamental, I’m afraid. But you’ll get it.
    Warmly,
    Nicole

  • Mary Kay
    September 15, 2009 at 5:39 PM

    Yes, that was helpful. The dough was a sticky goo. Normally it is not humid here, but it was a rainy day when I baked. I’ll try again and turn the temperature lower on the oven. and add small amounts of flour until it seems more pasty.

    Best Regards,
    Mary Kay

  • Nicole
    September 15, 2009 at 12:09 AM

    Hi, Mary Kay,

    I’m sorry you’re having a hard time. The consistency of the dough should be like a sticky goo, and more pasty than wet. The loaf always falls a bit, but rather than too much flour, a loaf that falls as much as you described usually has too much moisture. Is it humid where you live? That can affect things, too. And if your oven runs hot, rather than just tenting it, turn down the temperature. I’d rather see it bake slowly.
    Does any of this seem helpful?

    Warmly,
    Nicole

  • Mary Kay
    September 14, 2009 at 12:30 PM

    Nicloe,

    I have been baking gluten free for a few years now, this is the first bread made with chickpea flour. We loved the flavor, however, the bread rose up very high and the middle didn’t bake quite enough.

    My oven runs hot so the top browned very quickly, I covered it loosely with foil after 10 minutes of baking time, and continued baking for the remaining 25 minutes. While cooling the bread deflated on itself.
    I followed the recipe exactly, but 3 cups of flour seems like a lot for one loaf pan.

    It is still edible but it seems like there was too much dough for the pan. I want to make it again,any idea on what’s going on? The rice bread I make does something similar but I bake it in small loaf pans,while it doesn’t over rise, it does deflate some on itself as it cools.

    Thanks so much for your help,
    Mary Kay

  • Nicole
    September 12, 2009 at 6:19 PM

    Hi, Jennifer,
    This bread does make wonderful french toast. Your husband has excellent taste! Thanks so much for posting.
    Warmly,
    Nicole

  • Jennifer R
    September 10, 2009 at 8:22 PM

    I made French toast this weekend with this bread! My husband liked my gf french toast better than his wheat bread french toast. I forgot how much I really missed having french toast once in awhile. Thanks!

  • September 9, 2009 at 11:06 PM

    That picture looks delicious! I have almost all the ingredients needed to make that bread…all I need is the chickpea flour. Now all I need is the time to bake it. Maybe this weekend…

    • Nicole
      September 10, 2009 at 12:35 AM

      Hi, Iris,
      Generally, I’m not one for different sorts of flours. I like to stick with all purpose gf flour. But for this bread, it’s worth it. I hope you enjoy it!
      Warmly,
      Nicole

  • September 9, 2009 at 6:31 PM

    I found your recipe (well, Tom’s recipe) on your website a few weeks ago and tried it out tonight. My kids have been gluten free for about half a year and I’ve haven’t tried making bread yet. This was the first one that I felt brave enough to try! It was GREAT! The kids LOVED it and we ate all but a few slices in one sitting! Thanks so much for posting the recipe.
    I’m going to try the dough in muffin tins and see if I can make little rolls out of it…. :-)

  • Nicole
    September 9, 2009 at 4:29 PM

    Hi, Kareileen,
    I’m so glad the bread is working for you so well. We have the Cuisinart Bread Machine with the GF setting. It works beautifully. We have had it for years, and it’s still going strong. Welcome back to sandwiches!
    Warmly,
    Nicole

  • kareileen
    September 8, 2009 at 7:06 PM

    It’s been two weeks now, and I can happily say I have been eating -actual- sandwiches made with your bread recipe and I am LOVING IT! I forgot how filling a sandwich can be, and I am re-discovering peanut butter and jelly. (Not the same on a corn tortilla!!) THANK you so much- I got a Cuisinart Bread Machine (Actually the only machine I found the day I went out!) and it has a GF setting. Works great. It is a bit -huge- on my counter, but that is a small price to pay.
    Happily buried in sandwiches and toast… (and 6 pounds heavier! oops!)

  • Nicole
    August 31, 2009 at 2:11 AM

    Hi, Catherine,
    I’m so glad your introduction to making gluten free bread has gone so well! I wish I had come up with this recipe myself, but I’m glad to have it all the same…. Keep those standards high. Sometimes it takes a bit of trial and error, but the promise of good bread, and the fun of making it, really do deliver!
    Warmly,
    Nicole

  • Catherine
    August 30, 2009 at 4:08 PM

    My daughter and I made this bread this morning, and have just devoured over half the loaf for lunch! It is truly delicious, and very easy to make. I decided to just do it in a bowl (no bread machine or mixer), and it was quick and simple. We are all surprised at how good it tastes (we’re new to gluten-free, and we still have trouble with the idea of life without wheat, especially when it comes to bread) and feels in the mouth. I’ll be making sure to have all these flours around in large quantities. Fabulous.

  • […] rest is here:  Sandwich Bread | Gluten Free on a Shoestring Share and […]

  • Nicole
    August 25, 2009 at 2:30 AM

    Hi, Erin,
    It’s magic bread. I can’t explain it, but I can eat it just fine. I’m so glad you and your child are enjoying it!
    Warmly,
    Nicole

  • Erin
    August 24, 2009 at 9:07 PM

    I LOVE this bread!! It rises beautifully. Taste great and best of all my child loves it too. This is a reciepe I will keep and make over and over.

  • Nicole
    August 23, 2009 at 2:01 AM

    Hi, Karelieen,
    We have a Cuisinart bread machine that has a gluten free setting. We have had it for years, and it works beautifully, but I bet there are others out there these days. I am sincerely honored to have the ability to help you enjoy a sandwich for the first time in such a long time. This bread does not disappoint!
    Warmly,
    Nicole

    Hi, Brittany,
    You’re the best! It’s such a pleasure. I wish I could cook and bake for you!
    Warmly,
    Nicole

    Hi, Becky,
    I bet it would work with an egg replacer. I don’t have much experience with that, though. Have you been on the Gluten Free on a Shoestring facebook page? Maybe try asking there if anyone knows Ener-G egg replacer well enough to help you out. Anyone else here know? I will let you know if I learn anything useful.
    Warmly,
    Nicole

  • Becky
    August 23, 2009 at 1:18 AM

    By chance, do you know if this would work with an egg substitute (such as Ener-G egg replacer)? We’re egg, wheat, and diary allergic. Thanks!

  • Brittany
    August 23, 2009 at 12:53 AM

    Aaaaand now I have something to do tomorrow! We are going to a picnic concert in the park with yummy sandwiches for ALL of us now! YAY! GFOAS to the rescue, AGAIN!

    *mwah!* Thanks!

    :) Brittany

  • Kareileen
    August 22, 2009 at 2:32 AM

    oooooh it looks lovely! I also have problems with rice as well, and it is SO great to see a recipe for bread that does not include rice flour! Thank you so much! I have been debating about getting a bread machine, but this recipe has clinched it. I will get one tomorrow. I am glad you mentioned the “gluten free setting” I had no idea they had this on bread machines now…. Thank you again, and I look forward to my first SANDWICH in 9 years!!!

  • Nicole
    August 22, 2009 at 12:38 AM

    Hi, WordLily,
    Yes. It works beautifully in a bread machine. We almost always make it in one. The loaf you see in the picture above was made in a bread machine, in fact.
    Warmly,
    Nicole

  • August 21, 2009 at 9:37 PM

    Hm, do you know if this recipe works in a bread machine?

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