Quantcast
Search the Site

10 Lessons From Gluten-Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread

10 Lessons From Gluten-Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread

Introducing Gluten Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread! 10 Bread Lessons

Introducing the Gluten Free Bread Revolution!

My next cookbook, Gluten-Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread, is coming this November. It’s going to change things a lot. It’s going to raise the bar. It’s going to knock your gluten-free socks off! Everything I have done in the kitchen since I started baking gluten-free nearly 10 years ago has been leading up to this book, this bread, these methods. My heart is racing thinking about getting it out into the world. There will be a whole lotta hoopla over the next few months designed to get you as excited as I am about this book. Plus, scroll down for the 10 Lessons About Gluten-Free Bread That I Can Share Right Now. And be sure to leave a Comment Below asking your questions about the book (what recipes are in there? what equipment will I need? what is a pure levain sourdough and how is it made? They’re all fair questions, and I will do my best to answer).

First off. You should totally pre-order Bakes Bread. Why? Here are 5 Good Reasons:

1. You’ll get it as soon as it’s ready to ship—often even before it says “In Stock” on amazon. You’ll probably even get it considerably before the “on-sale” date of November 26, which is a date 2 weeks after my publisher ships the books from its warehouse. It is designed by the industry to give retailers time to unpack the boxes and get the books on the shelves. Online retailers like amazon need less time for all that jazz, so they ship faster.

2. Book retailers won’t run out of stock! Healthy pre-order sales ensure that no one runs out of stock after publication. Tell my publisher that you’re excited for the book! Then they won’t be caught out—and neither will you. This is one of the only ways to influence stock. I have way, way less control than most readers assume (read: I have, like, no control).

3. Pay less for the book. I’m sure you’ve noticed that amazon.com discounts book prices. The promotion that they do of particular books and the prices they charge for them are based in part on sales. More sales = heavier discounting. And when you pre-order on amazon, you get a lowest-price guarantee. Do your part to lower the price for everyone! I’ll be pre-ordering to do my part! (really)

4. Win free stuff … from me directly! Over the next few months, there will contests and giveaways here on the blog. Pre-order now and you’ll be eligible to win all kinds of cool free gluten free bread stuff later. Everything from signed copies of the book from me to you all the way up to a grand prize of a baker’s dozen worth of my favorite cooking essentials and kitchen tools (details in the coming weeks).

5. It’s that good. At the risk of sounding immodest (sorry!), this is my best book so far. Check out the sneak peek of the book right here on the blog, and see for yourself why you want this cookbook the minute it comes out (click on the link above, the link in the sidebar, or the picture just below to see the whole .pdf document). There are TONS of process photos and plenty of beauty shots of everything from Olive Garden-style breadsticks to monkey bread to pure sourdough No Rye Rye Bread (see that round on the cover? That’s what that is):

BLAD-snapshot

Now, on to the super useful gluten-free bread knowledge I’m gonna lay on you right now:

10 Lessons I Learned About Gluten Free Bread

Right after we wrapped the photo shoot for the new book, baking my way through a total of 75 pounds of gluten free flour in 4 weeks’ time, I sat down and wrote this list. While I can’t show you everything in the book just yet (although there will, of course, be a preview recipe or two on the blog closer to the big day), I can tell you these 10 things that I think you should know right now about gluten free bread right now. You should be able to incorporate these tips into your mindset and into your bread-baking now, and even more so once you have this cookbook in your hands.

1. Start wet. Then add flour on the outside to make it dry. That way you can manipulate the dough without getting that dreaded tight crumb in your finished bread. Just be sure you use a light touch when handling the dough. And with my new methods & recipes for baking gluten-free bread that you will learn all about in the new book, there will be no weepy, sad mounds of gluten-free bread dough that simply don’t resemble bread dough as anyone before has ever known it. See? I told you that everything was going to change.

2. Cold (refrigerator) bulk fermentation is the way to go. Especially when you’re working with a gluten free bread that doesn’t have too many enrichments (like eggs and butter), a long, slow rise in the refrigerator will not only make your life easier (no waiting around for the dough to achieve its first rise!), but it will make the bread more flavorful (from slow yeast development) and easier to handle. Yeast is still active at refrigerator temperatures. It’s just slower. And as the dough rises in the refrigerator, it absorbs more and more of the moisture in the dough. So the bread dough (and ultimately the bread) is still moist, but it doesn’t feel as much like it as you handle it.

3. Don’t expect more of your gluten free bread than you would of conventional bread. Just like in conventional bread baking, if you try to cram too much nutrition into your gluten free bread, it’s harder to have a successful recipe. So if you’re tempted to swap out flours, expect that it will throw things off and that the dough will be more difficult to handle. I have plenty of recipes for hearty gluten free bread in the new book. But none of them is 100% whole grain, and that’s a good thing. It’s your bread, not your vegetables.

4. It’s different, but not that different. With my new method and recipes, gluten free bread dough can get so so soclose to conventional bread dough. So close. But it will still be a bit different. That difference doesn’t have to be bad. Baking gluten free bread should still be pleasurable. And it will be. Just you wait.

5. Flours matter a lot. Gluten free flour blends that are super high in starch absorb tons more moisture and struggle to brown in the oven. They make for a dough that is relatively easy to handle, but the bread itself will disappoint you. Or it should. If it doesn’t disappoint you, then you’re expecting too little from gluten free bread.

6. Baking bread is super environmentally sensitive. The same recipe that I’ve tested upwards of 50 times will work one way in the cold, dry winter and another way in the warm, steamy summertime. In every recipe, I begin with a stable amount of liquid, and then add flour for balance. It is easier to tighten up a dough than to loosen it. Fact.

7. A stand mixer really helps, but there are options. It isn’t impossible without one, but it sure makes things easier. And, since the recipes in the new book are intended to make bread that is smooth and taut on top (look at the book cover!), you need a mixer to knead the dough until it’s smooth and elastic. But good news! I did some research, and there’s hope yet if you don’t have and don’t plan to get a stand mixer. The KitchenAid 5-speed hand mixer with the dough hooks attached can get the job done. Woohoo!

8. We can have it all. Everything from focaccia bread with big, yeasty holes that’s crispy on the outside and pillowy on the inside to bagels that hold their shape, yeasted donuts that rise straight up instead of out and pure levain sourdough bread that rises high as the sky, all without any commercial yeast. We can have it ALL (well, as soon as the book comes out we can have it all).

9. Dairy-free is, indeed, harder than gluten-free. But there are work-arounds. Milk protein behaves most similarly to gluten (a protein) in baking. Soy has a similar structure, but behaves very, very differently in baking. Don’t worry, though. I’ve got tricks up my sleeve for my dairy-free friends.

10. This book really needed to be written. I don’t mean that I was the only one in the world who could write it. Far from it. I’m honored to be able to do it, but mostly someone just needed to put in the work and get it done. A really really good book of artisan gluten free bread recipes was seriously lacking in the marketplace. And once I committed to writing it, there was no room for excuses. Nothing less than ah-mazing was acceptable. I have never worked so hard in my entire life, but it has never been so, so worth it.

Now it’s your turn. What are your questions about the new book? Is there a particular recipe you hope to see? Wondering what equipment you’ll need? Want to know what a pure sourdough really is, and whether you’ll be able to have it?Ask away! I will do my best to answer…

Love,
Me

P.S. If you’ve haven’t pre-ordered Gluten-Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread yet, what are you waiting for?! Time’s ticking!

Comments are closed.

  • Carol Kempen Tuttoilmondo
    March 14, 2014 at 10:55 AM

    Can I use a Cuisinart Food Processor to mix the dough? I do not have a stand mixer. Thanks.

    • March 30, 2014 at 5:05 PM

      I’m afraid not. I discuss in the book using a 5-speed KitchenAid hand mixer with the dough hooks, though.

  • Trish
    February 25, 2014 at 5:40 PM

    Nicole, I just got a Cuisinart stand mixer which came with a spiral bread hook, a flat mixing paddle and a whisk. Which one should I mix my GF bread dough?

    • February 26, 2014 at 12:40 PM

      The bread hook, Trish!

  • Sasha
    February 25, 2014 at 1:00 PM

    Nicole, On Sunday morning, I made real, doughy, yeasty cinnamon rolls for the first time in years. I have Challah dough in the fridge now (rising for the last several days) and tonight, I will roll and shape actual bread dough and I will tell the bread the shape I want it to take, as opposed to it laughing at me and choosing a form of its own. I cannot believe you found the answer to mimicking gluten protein with the whey isolate. Your book hasn’t left my coffee table since I bought it. I make notes in the margins, and make small tweaks for my oven,and it’s covered in flour. I am so wonderfully impressed, and cannot thank you enough for all of the hard work you put into this. What a joy. There will be bread!

    • February 26, 2014 at 12:40 PM

      Sasha, that is music to my ears (eyes?)! These recipes, this book, has been a very, very long time coming for me. Anything less than true, authentic yeast bread was not an option! I’m so glad that you are really giving that cookbook a workout, and grateful that you told me about it. :-*

  • Mary
    February 19, 2014 at 2:50 PM

    I have tried 3 batches of your wonderbread;). I feel like I am doing everything correctly but getting poor results. This last batch today I let rise 4 hours until I saw no more progress in a specially heated room. I just comes out so dense. My yeast is fresh. I do notice when I get dough from fridge it is very cold and doesn’t fold well could my fridge be too cold and I know I’m not overworking it for sure maybe under working it? It’s 36 degrees.

    • February 26, 2014 at 12:38 PM

      Mary, I recommend that you read the Bread FAQs page. I think your answer is probably in there!

  • Diane Buege Buendia
    January 17, 2014 at 11:21 PM

    I recently got your bread book (after reading about it in a gf magazine) & I am soooo excited!! I was a big baker prior to learning I had to be gf (& my son also), I do make home made gf bread on a very regular basis, but none of it is satisfactory IMO. I have my first loaf slow rising in the fridge now. My son & husband are dairy free, so I’m using the pea protein. Do I still fold it over & then shape it as directed in the recipe when I’m doing it dairy free??

    • January 17, 2014 at 11:35 PM

      Hi, Diane, Please see this newer post on the blog. Read the earliest comments on the post (at the bottom of the comments). I discuss the dairy free dough there. It isn’t the same, I’m afraid. You’ll need to shape it with wet hands, but the results will be similar!

    • Diane Buege Buendia
      January 17, 2014 at 11:59 PM

      Thank you for responding so quickly! I clicked on the link you provided but I can’t find info about what to do after the first rise in the refrigerator when it’s dairy free.

  • Diane Buege Buendia
    January 17, 2014 at 6:21 PM

    I recently got your bread book (after reading about it in a gf magazine) & I am soooo excited!! I was a big baker prior to learning I had to be gf (& my son also), I do make home made gf bread on a very regular basis, but none of it is satisfactory IMO. I have my first loaf slow rising in the fridge now. My son & husband are dairy free, so I’m using the pea protein. Do I still fold it over & then shape it as directed in the recipe when I’m doing it dairy free??

    • January 17, 2014 at 6:35 PM

      Hi, Diane, Please see this newer post on the blog. Read the earliest comments on the post (at the bottom of the comments). I discuss the dairy free dough there. It isn’t the same, I’m afraid. You’ll need to shape it with wet hands, but the results will be similar!

    • Diane Buege Buendia
      January 17, 2014 at 6:59 PM

      Thank you for responding so quickly! I clicked on the link you provided but I can’t find info about what to do after the first rise in the refrigerator when it’s dairy free.

    • Diane Buege Buendia
      January 17, 2014 at 7:03 PM

      Oh now I found it! Thanks again!!

  • Megan
    January 6, 2014 at 10:01 PM

    I mean crisp on outside but gooey/uncooked dough on inside.

  • Megan
    January 6, 2014 at 9:59 PM

    I made your GF poptarts and after baking they remained gooey (almost uncooked-dough) on inside, but crisp on inside. Is there a special type of jam I’m supposed to use? I used an organic seedless jelly.

  • Angie Hepp
    December 6, 2013 at 5:17 PM

    Hello Nicole! I ordered your book last week and finally received the last of the ingredients. I made up the dough for the focaccia and it is in the frig now. However, the dough is really more like pancake batter. Should I add more flour now, or wait until it has been in the frig for a few days? I know there is NO way I would be able to shape the dough at this point. And when I add flour, should I use the all purpose blend, or the bread flour blend, since it is SO wet?

    Thanks, and I’m looking forward to trying the other recipes!!

    • December 6, 2013 at 6:17 PM

      Hi, Angie,
      First, if you read through the whole recipe for either type of focaccia in the book, it says that “The dough will be very wet and may be difficult to handle.” Please also refer to page 23, which states that, even with this new way of making gluten free bread, “wet dough is not a thing of the past, entirely. … For example, the Herb Focaccia … has 80 percent hydration, which is what is responsible for the beautiful, large holes in its crumb.”
      Second, please be sure that you measured your ingredients properly by weight, and that you mixed the dough with the dough hook until “a trail of dough from the hook to the bowl [is] intact for at least the count of five.” Otherwise, you have not worked the dough enough with the mixer hook. All authentic gluten-containing focaccia dough has a very high hydration, so it is a very, very wet dough. It is not, however, pourable like pancake batter.
      Nicole

    • Angie Hepp
      December 6, 2013 at 7:41 PM

      Thank you! I did read all of the above, so I was aware that it would be wet and difficult to handle, but I felt like my dough was WAY too wet, even for GF dough. I did measure all my ingredients by weight, and did not make any substitutions. I mixed it for about 5 minutes, as stated in the recipe, so I will just mix it some more and maybe add a bit more flour on baking day. *fingers crossed!* :)

    • December 6, 2013 at 7:45 PM

      It is not wet because it’s gluten free dough, Angie. It is wet because real focaccia is a very, very high hydration dough (80% hydration – 100% hydration would be as much water as flour). Follow the directions on baking day and sprinkle flour liberally, but resist the urge to add more with your mixer. And the olive oil you use to shape it will assist you in spreading it on a baking pan. Basically, the wetter you can keep it, the bigger the holes will be when you finally bake it. You will not be kneading this by hand in a traditional sense – only scrape and fold, and not a ton of that, even. Have fun!

    • Angie Hepp
      December 6, 2013 at 11:25 PM

      Great explanation, thanks! Hopefully this will help anyone else who has the same question. And good news…I just checked on the dough in the frig – it has firmed up and has already risen and mounded up some in the bowl. I touched it and it feels firmer, too! Yay! Now if I can just hold out long enough until baking day! I’ll try to resist the urge to bake it too soon. I’m striving for closer to 5 days…

  • Dawn Rennick
    December 4, 2013 at 10:33 AM

    As of today, there is no Nook version…:(

    • December 4, 2013 at 11:06 AM

      Hi, Dawn, there will be! It just isn’t up for pre-order just yet. But it will 100% for sure be available (in fact I’m reviewing the digital version of the book today!) and should be by publication date (12/10).

  • STEPHANIE CALDWELL
    November 22, 2013 at 1:03 PM

    Thank you somuch for spending the time to put this book together! We just learned about a month ago that our 2 1/2 year old is gluten-intolerant… so I’ve been spending all of my free time (after working a full day outside the home) scouring the internet trying to learn about GF baking… I just pre-ordered your book on amazon and I can’t wait for it to come in the mail!!!

    I do have a question though, when my dough rises beautifully and bakes nicely, but then falls when I take it out of the oven, what am I doing wrong? Granted, this wasn’t your recipe (as I just found your blog this week) but I’m curious “in theory” what you opinion would be?

    Thank you so much!!

    • December 4, 2013 at 11:07 AM

      Generally, Stephanie, bread that rises well and then sinks (and I talk about this in the Troubleshooting section of the new bread book) is due to a too-hot oven. It bakes the outside of the bread too quickly, long before the inside has the structure necessary to support the rise. As it cools, the hot air seeps out and the bread falls.

  • Louise
    November 17, 2013 at 8:50 PM

    Hi – I really want your book! We have just been told our son can’t eat almond or coconut flours (any salicylates), and most gf books are full of them at the moment, does yours have a good selection without these things?
    Also, are there a few I can use in a bread maker? Our kids are always hungry and I can’t keep up!
    Thanks,
    Louise

    • December 4, 2013 at 11:08 AM

      Hi, Louise, there is no almond or coconut flour at all in this cookbook. This is not a bread machine book, though. I do not use or recommend use of a bread machine. I find that they differ considerably from brand to brand, making universal instructions a near-impossibility, and make an odd-shaped loaf.

    • December 4, 2013 at 4:08 PM

      Hi, Louise, there is no almond or coconut flour at all in this cookbook. This is not a bread machine book, though. I do not use or recommend use of a bread machine. I find that they differ considerably from brand to brand, making universal instructions a near-impossibility, and make an odd-shaped loaf.

  • Susan
    November 15, 2013 at 12:22 AM

    Hi Nicole, Thanks for all your good work in the kitchen, on line and in print. Are there recipes in your new book that do not contain potato starch and/or potato flour? For your recipes that do contain potato starch and/or potato flour, have you tested or can you recommend substitutes? Thanks!

    • Susan
      November 16, 2013 at 8:46 AM

      PS In most other GF/dairy-free recipes, I have excellent success substituting tapioca starch or arrowroot powder for potato starch (depending on the balance of other ingredients), but I’m stumped when it comes to potato flour.

  • Josie
    November 3, 2013 at 12:34 PM

    Hi Nicole,
    Will there be any bread recipes in your book that don’t contain xanthum gum & yeast. And can I sub coconut milk for milk?

  • Jennifer
    November 3, 2013 at 4:03 AM

    Nicole, have they pushed the book to December? Amazon is showing Dec 3rd now. I’m so excited to read this book and don’t want to wait an extra week. Who can I contact in protest? :)

  • Ali Kermit Newcombe
    September 30, 2013 at 8:50 PM

    I live in New Zealand where can I get your books from??

  • Laura
    September 9, 2013 at 11:47 AM

    I have been diagnosed with celiac disease for seven years now but I’m tired of spending all my money on food I don’t really like. I used to bake all the time with regular all purpose flour then when gluten free came into the picture it was not so fun anymore and highly expensive just to do trial foods. My mom showed me Cup 4 Cup gluten free flour from Williams and sonoma, and it’s good it’s just so dense, it tastes better than when i have to mix everything but I wanted to know how to get a little bit fluffier bread that can still rise and not turn out like a brick… any suggestions? Should I use xantham gum or carbonated water? I just don’t know what would help, if anything?

  • Priscilla Lane
    September 1, 2013 at 5:53 AM

    Does Lesson #2 mean that you don’t use a “proofing chamber” anymore to raise bread? I just bought your first book (waiting on the new one too) and I am going to start baking from it tonight! Do you recommend raising those breads in the fridge?

  • Morgan
    August 23, 2013 at 3:48 AM

    I have been fiddling and substituting and converting and weighing gluten free recipes for a few years now and real, good, artisan, delicious bread has eluded me. I’m really looking forward to the sourdough recipe. God I miss good bread. I’ve pre-ordered. Now I have a reason to be happy for summer to end :)

  • Adaptagirl
    August 20, 2013 at 9:25 AM

    Thanks so much for writing this. I’m just starting to go Gluten-free and I have two of your books on my Kindle. I was looking forward to adding this to my Kindle, too, but went ahead and ordered the physical version just now when I saw the chance to win free stuff! :) Great thing is, Amazon doesn’t charge you til they ship it.

    And also, I discovered another benefit to ordering now.

    #6. Adding a pre-order of Bakes Bread to your cart that is under the limit will qualify your order for free Super Saver Shipping. Doesn’t matter if it doesn’t ship til December or whenever.

    Thanks so much for this blog, your books, and the upcoming giveaways.

  • AsIfUknow
    August 19, 2013 at 1:04 PM

    will there be many options for making the recipes MSPI as well as GF? My son is Milk/Soy Protein Intolerant and w/my daughter & I needing GF – I am sick of making 3 different versions of everything!

    I thank God for you, your VERY GENEROUS blog & your talents every single day!

    • August 19, 2013 at 1:18 PM

      The yeast bread recipes are not dairy free, as the flour that I use as a “gluten free bread flour” contains dairy. However, I offer recommendations of the best dairy-free substitutes to use, after considerable experimentation. The dairy-free substitutes are soy-free (and off the top of my head, I can’t think of any of recipes that rely upon soy).

      xoxo Nicole

    • AsIfUknow
      August 19, 2013 at 3:55 PM

      you totally ROCK!

      THANK YOU!

  • Scarlett Acklin
    August 16, 2013 at 10:06 PM

    I know you suggest we don’t double the batch, but can we half the recipe or freeze the dough?

    • August 19, 2013 at 1:12 PM

      I do not recommend freezing unbaked yeast dough, Scarlett. Sometimes the yeast is fully active when it defrosts, and sometimes it is not.

  • Cheryl
    August 13, 2013 at 4:53 AM

    I should have also asked which book applies to the yeast breads/pizza dough?

    • August 19, 2013 at 5:16 PM

      Both books have recipes for yeast breads, Cheryl, but the second book concentrates a bit more on yeast-free breads, as they are faster and the book is entitled “Quick & Easy.”

  • Cheryl
    August 13, 2013 at 12:48 AM

    Which book would have the pizza dough and bread recipes? Pancakes & waffles in another? Not sure which one to buy to get the pizza & bread recipes in particular. Secondary would be the breakfast items. Since I do not need to worry about dairy/egg free, are most of your recipes dairy & egg free? Thank you so much in advance for your response. I really enjoyed your website – a wealth of information!

    • August 19, 2013 at 1:16 PM

      I would recommend you use the “Look Inside” feature on amazon.com, Cheryl for both of my existing books. You will be able to see the entire table of contents for both books there.
      Nicole

  • Dee Dee
    August 12, 2013 at 2:25 PM

    Anxiously wating for this book to be out. I have both your other books and have not had a failed recipe yet as I have had with other GF cookbooks. Your way of writing is also very encouraging too. It makes it easier to transition from never making anything from scratch to having to make Everything from scratch to suit the special diet needs of my kids. Thanks for making things easier!

    • August 19, 2013 at 1:15 PM

      Thanks so much for the kind note, Dee Dee. I’m so glad you have found my books useful and encouraging. Encouraging readers is something I consider to be my number 1 job!
      xoxo Nicole

  • Tammy
    August 6, 2013 at 7:39 AM

    Oops!! I left a comment elsewhere, but just saw this thread!! So, my questions are whether you have sourdough recipes in your new bread book and if you have instructions on creating a Wild Yeast sourdough starter?

    Thanks so much for your blog, your books and your incredible way of communicating such intense information!! You make it easy and fun and non-overwhelming! And you’rereally funny to boot!! I wish you had had this blog and books when my mom was diagnosed with refractory-celiac disease some 13 years ago. She has since passed away (last August)– she would have loved it!!

    Can’t wait for your book!!

    -Tammy

    • August 19, 2013 at 1:13 PM

      I responded on the other thread, Tammy, so you know there is, indeed a Wild Yeast Sourdough Starter, along with a whole chapter of recipes based on it. :)
      xoxo Nicole

  • Milja
    August 6, 2013 at 2:32 AM

    Hi Nicole,
    Great initiative and best of luck to you for your new book. Question: many recipes I find, contain Xanthan Gum, Guar Gum or things like Tartar ‘something’, all things that are not sold in my country and I have not been able to find anywhere else. Do recipes in your new book depend on those ingredients aswell or do you provide bread recipes without the above? Furthermore I’d like to know if any other top allergens are used. I read about eggs, but what about soy, dairy, peanuts, treenuts and stuff like that? As I namely cook and bake free of all top 14 (in Europe at least) ingredients I am curious as to what to expect in your new book.
    Do wish you all the best! I am convinced it will be so helpful for so many.
    Kindest regards.

    • August 19, 2013 at 1:14 PM

      Hi, Milja,
      Yes, my recipes do require some xanthan gum, and sometimes cream of tartar, if that is what you are referring to. My recipes are only decidedly gluten free, not free of all top allergens. I give directions for how to convert the recipes to dairy-free.
      Nicole

    • Priscilla Lane
      September 17, 2013 at 6:51 PM

      Cream of tartar can be found in the spices area, for some reason. It is sometimes called potassium bitartrate. It is probably available in your country under a different name.

  • […] to toot my own horn, but it’s gonna be BIG, and I want you to be in on it (more horn-tooting here). In the meanwhile, I give you 8 fabulous gluten free bread recipes all in one of my favorite blog […]

  • July 31, 2013 at 12:15 PM

    Hi, Elke,
    Other than a recipe for Oatmeal Bread in the new book, I don’t recall any recipes that call for gluten free oats. You should be good to go!
    xoxo Nicole

  • […] Ellis, director Paul Schrader and actress Lindsay Lohan, having to do with the end of cinema. The shoestring-budget movie opens with a bleak, de-saturated montage of […]

  • […] 10 Lessons from Gluten Free to Make Bread […]

  • Elke Haggerty
    July 29, 2013 at 6:53 PM

    Your book sounds fantastic! Do many of your recipes in your various cookbooks have oats in them? We cannot tolerate even GF oats, perhaps because the storage protein in oats, avenue, is similar to the storage protein in wheat.

    PS: I have co-authored a free layman’s Guide for Gluten Free Living with a whole variety of information on Celiac and living gluten, incl. diagnosis and symptomology. People can get it by e-mailing gfingp at yahoo dot ca (hope you don’t mind me saying that). Your website is listed as a good resource.

  • gallowayh
    July 28, 2013 at 12:50 AM

    Just made your carrot cake cupcakes for my newly diagnosed with Celiac daughter, who was craving carrot cake. She LOVED them thank you!,,

  • TheNanny
    July 25, 2013 at 8:49 PM

    Is there a bread recipe that contains uses seeds in the recipes? My little guy loved multigrain bread before he needed to be GF. I have tried a recipe that used sesame seeds, sunflower seeds, and flax seeds – while I loved the crunch the bread tasted sour.

    • July 26, 2013 at 8:56 AM

      Hi, Nanny, yes there are recipes in the book that contain seeds, and whole grain recipes to which you can easily add seeds.
      Nicole

  • Cindy aka Babka
    July 25, 2013 at 11:56 AM

    Hi Nicole. I preordered your new cookbook on Amazon as well as your first 2 books. I was only recently diagnosed & it has been a difficult adjustment. But I am a seasoned cook & baker so once the shock wore off I am now embracing the challenge. There are hundreds of gf blogs online. But I only follow 3 faithfully: yours, Gluten free Carla, & GF Girl & the Chef. The recipes are reliable, yummy, & normal. Thank you for helping me to not only make delicious foods again but doing it with a reasonable cost! Many hugs to you!!

    • July 26, 2013 at 8:57 AM

      Hi, Cindy, Thank you so much for your support and the kind words. The first weeks and months after diagnosis can be quite difficult as the learning curve is steep, but thankfully it’s over rather quickly. It sounds like you really have your footing, and it will only get better from here!
      xoxo Nicole

    • […] Shoestring Bakes Bread. I highly recommend that you pre-order my new bread book for all the reasons listed here (& don’t forget to ask your questions about the new book!). But the recipe below works. […]

    • July 26, 2013 at 12:57 PM

      Hi, Cindy, Thank you so much for your support and the kind words. The first weeks and months after diagnosis can be quite difficult as the learning curve is steep, but thankfully it’s over rather quickly. It sounds like you really have your footing, and it will only get better from here!
      xoxo Nicole

  • lettergirl
    July 25, 2013 at 8:49 AM

    Hi Nicole, I read your blog regularly and have both of your cookbooks. I have pretty much memorized your deep dish pizza dough recipe. (It makes yummy calzones too!) I was wondering if any of your new recipes will use whole psyllium husk instead of gums? I’ve been using another recipe for regular pizza dough that is awesome, nice & crispy outside and chewy inside — it also uses the refrigerator method for rising, and the psyllium was pretty easy to find. Just wondered if you had experimented with that at all? Thanks for your commitment to yummy gluten free food! Gina

    • July 26, 2013 at 9:02 AM

      Hi, lettergirl,
      I do not bake with psyllium husk. It does not create the texture that I was determined to create in the recipes in my new book, at least not in my experience, and especially in the dough stage, as it requires a significant amount of liquid. If you have found something that works for you, though, by all means keep it going!
      Nicole

  • Rita
    July 23, 2013 at 7:26 PM

    I am fairly new to Gluten Free but your 2 cookbooks are my go-to books. They are clear and practical. I can’t wait for your bread book. I haven’t done a lot of baking yet as I’m a little skeptical because everything I have purchased GF premade has been a disappointment and expensive. My goal is to make GF breads that don’t crumble. Will you have pizza dough in your new book? I know it’s in your other cookbook but I haven’t had the courage to make it yet. Thanks for providing us with a wonderful website, it’s one of my favorites!

    • July 26, 2013 at 8:59 AM

      Hi, Rita,
      You bet there will be pizza dough in the new book! A few different types, actually. And nothing at all will be crumbly! That is completely unacceptable in gluten free bread. We have come so far in the last few years, and this book will hopefully take things to another level. Cheers to never accepting crumbly bread!
      xoxo Nicole

  • Emily Munson Keeter
    July 23, 2013 at 5:01 PM

    Are any of the breads yeast free? My son has multiple food allergies. Will preorder if there is only one great one .. I’m desperate! AND a fan of your blog.

    • July 23, 2013 at 5:03 PM

      Yes, some of the recipes are yeast free, Emily. But honestly, if I were you, I’d stick with my second book, Gluten-Free on a Shoestring Quick & Easy. There are actually a ton of yeast-free breads and other recipes (like cinnamon buns) in that book. It sounds like it might be a better fit for you. :)

      xoxo Nicole

    • Emily Munson Keeter
      July 24, 2013 at 11:08 AM

      Will do! Much thanks!

    • July 23, 2013 at 9:03 PM

      Yes, some of the recipes are yeast free, Emily. But honestly, if I were you, I’d stick with my second book, Gluten-Free on a Shoestring Quick & Easy. There are actually a ton of yeast-free breads and other recipes (like cinnamon buns) in that book. It sounds like it might be a better fit for you. :)

      xoxo Nicole

    • Emily Munson Keeter
      July 24, 2013 at 3:08 PM

      Will do! Much thanks!

  • Cathleen Preslar- Hawks
    July 23, 2013 at 8:35 PM

    I’m so excited about this book! Congrats on seeing all your hard work come together, and know that this book will revolutionize gf bread baking for so many of us. We love you.
    -Cathy xo

    • July 23, 2013 at 9:04 PM

      Wow, Cathleen, thank you so very much for the kind words. I think this book really does have the potential to change everything. But once it comes out, it’s in your capable hands to do the baking—and it sounds like you’re game. For that I’m so grateful. :)
      xoxo Nicole

  • Cathleen Preslar- Hawks
    July 23, 2013 at 4:35 PM

    I’m so excited about this book! Congrats on seeing all your hard work come together, and know that this book will revolutionize gf bread baking for so many of us. We love you.
    -Cathy xo

    • July 23, 2013 at 5:04 PM

      Wow, Cathleen, thank you so very much for the kind words. I think this book really does have the potential to change everything. But once it comes out, it’s in your capable hands to do the baking—and it sounds like you’re game. For that I’m so grateful. :)
      xoxo Nicole

    • Cathleen Preslar- Hawks
      July 24, 2013 at 9:40 AM

      Haha! I’m always ready for whatever recipes you throw at us! Especially when it means that we don’t have to settle for dry, stale, store-bought baked goods, or a batter bread pretending to be a kneaded, deliciously chewy artisan loaf.
      After much griping about horrible product for the gf people in my area ( I live on the border of Ulster and Orange County, NY. If I want anything from Trader Joe’s or Whole Foods I have to go to Danbury or Westchester. We have Adams Fairacre Farm mkts, but they don’t have everything those others do.) I stumbled onto your blog. It changed my entire outlook on gf baking. The first thing I made was the Japanese Milk Bread, and it was totally awesome. From then on, I was hooked. My go-to flour blend is the Cup4Cup hack (sans xanthan. I add it as needed.) And, I have to tell you, THANK YOU for the never-ending array of yummy, diverse foods you present. I am always surprised, never bored, and totally motivated by you.
      -Cathy

    • July 26, 2013 at 9:00 AM

      Love it, Cathleen! I so hear you on this, by the way: “batter bread pretending to be a kneaded, deliciously chewy artisan loaf.” Say goodbye to that forever!!
      xoxo Nicole

  • DianaLesireBrandmeyer
    July 23, 2013 at 2:02 PM

    Getting ready to preorder since the other books are amazing. Does this book have a recipe for Pretzle Buns? I had them before going GF in Nashiville…miss them.

    • July 23, 2013 at 5:05 PM

      Hi, Diana, Yes, there is a recipe for pretzel rolls in this book—and a darn good one at that. But there is also a recipe (using the old method) on the blog, too, for Gluten Free Soft Pretzel Rolls that you might like to try sooner. The new one is a step up, I think, but the current one is no slouch. ;)

      xoxo Nicole

    • DianaLesireBrandmeyer
      July 24, 2013 at 8:46 AM

      Woo hoo. I found it last night and started it this morning. You’re brillant adding the dry to the wet makes a huge difference in how the dough fills. I’m taking photos and will do a blog post next week (Friday) and refer them back to you. Pretty excited about pretzel dough buns and burgers tonight.

  • Lynn A. Decker
    July 23, 2013 at 3:21 PM

    I just pre-ordered mine! Yay!

  • ChefMomB
    July 23, 2013 at 12:48 AM

    What kind of flour(s) do you use? I ordered some different GF flours in bulk, but it seems like every recipe online I look at has yet another flour I don’t have!

    • July 23, 2013 at 5:11 PM

      Hi, ChefMom, I don’t generally do that sort of million-flour baking, as a rule. So you’re not likely to have that problem here. As far as flours in the bread book, I have a flour blend that I call a Gluten Free Bread Flour blend. For its base, you can use one of two base all-purpose flours to build it (along with two other components). One of those base all-purpose flours is my mock Better Batter blend (from the blog, which is also repeated in the book – although you can of course also just use Better Batter). The other is a simple 3-ingredient basic blend, with a bit of added xanthan gum. So, nothing we haven’t used before as the base.
      xoxo Nicole

    • July 23, 2013 at 9:11 PM

      Hi, ChefMom, I don’t generally do that sort of million-flour baking, as a rule. So you’re not likely to have that problem here. As far as flours in the bread book, I have a flour blend that I call a Gluten Free Bread Flour blend. For its base, you can use one of two base all-purpose flours to build it (along with two other components). One of those base all-purpose flours is my mock Better Batter blend (from the blog, which is also repeated in the book – although you can of course also just use Better Batter). The other is a simple 3-ingredient basic blend, with a bit of added xanthan gum. So, nothing we haven’t used before as the base.
      xoxo Nicole

  • Kris
    July 22, 2013 at 9:44 PM

    Do your recipes include a lot of eggs? Not a bad thing, but not worth my time as my daughter is allergic to both gluten and eggs.

    • July 23, 2013 at 5:07 PM

      Hi, Kris,
      Gluten free bread baking typically relies heavily upon eggs to create structure, mouth feel and rise. My previous bread recipes certainly have. However, with my new recipes and method in the new book, unless a recipe would otherwise already be enriched with eggs (like brioche or cloverleaf rolls), these recipes typically do not contain eggs. So it sounds like perhaps it could be very useful for you and your daughter. :)

      xoxo Nicole

  • Sandra Sellers Rice
    July 22, 2013 at 8:57 PM

    I preordered as soon as I could. I can’t wait!, I love your first books and look forward to the comments here as well!

    • July 23, 2013 at 5:06 PM

      Thank you so much, Sandra! I can’t wait for you to get the book in your hands!
      xoxo Nicole

    • July 23, 2013 at 9:06 PM

      Thank you so much, Sandra! I can’t wait for you to get the book in your hands!
      xoxo Nicole

  • karen
    July 23, 2013 at 12:28 AM

    I ordered it first thing this morning and I cannot wait to get the book. I have no questions as I am a seasoned gluten free cook and baker and I LOVE all of your recipes!

  • Cindy
    July 22, 2013 at 6:44 PM

    How labor intensive are the recipes? I’m not inclined to bake my own bread unless its easy!
    Also, how many of the recipes work well dairy free?
    Thank you! Can’t wait to see the preview!

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:30 PM

      Hi, Cindy,The yeast bread recipes are not gluten free, as the flour that I use as a “gluten free bread flour” contains dairy. However, I offer recommendations of the best dairy-free substitutes to use, after considerable experimentation.

      xoxo Nicole

  • Samantha
    July 22, 2013 at 6:31 PM

    Well done if you have cracked the art of gluten free bread baking but do your recipes still contain eggs and gums? It seems bakers out there still rely on these ingredients but they are not needed, I assure you!

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:28 PM

      As I have mentioned below a few times, my recipes in the new book do not rely upon eggs unless the recipe is for something like brioche, which is inherently an enriched bread. But yes, some xanthan gum is part of the mix.
      Good luck with your own method!
      Nicole

    • karen
      July 22, 2013 at 8:28 PM

      I ordered it first thing this morning and I cannot wait to get the book. I have no questions as I am a seasoned gluten free cook and baker and I LOVE all of your recipes!

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:29 PM

      Love it, Karen! You sound ready to go! Thank you so much for your support. And I truly love your confidence. Oh the bread you’ll bake!
      xoxo Nicole

    • July 23, 2013 at 12:28 AM

      As I have mentioned below a few times, my recipes in the new book do not rely upon eggs unless the recipe is for something like brioche, which is inherently an enriched bread. But yes, some xanthan gum is part of the mix.
      Good luck with your own method!
      Nicole

  • ladoramartin
    July 22, 2013 at 5:45 PM

    Have your other two books and can’t wait for this new one! My question is often certain flour mixes have different results. Is there going to be a standard flour mix that will make most of the recipes. I hate having to have a bunch of different flour mixes just for certain things. I would love to have a baking day and make a variety for my family.

    • ladoramartin
      July 22, 2013 at 5:49 PM

      I also learned an awesome way to make smooth top bread at the Gluten Free Expo this year and can’t wait to see if this same trick is used in your book.

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:26 PM

      Yes, definitely ladoramartin, there will be one standard “gluten free bread flour blend” that will be the base for almost every recipe in the book. And it’s really the ingredients and long, slow refrigerator rise that lead to a smooth, taut surface on the bread. No real trick. Previously, I had just smoothed the top with wet fingers and it did the trick pretty well, but that doesn’t hold a candle to the new way. :)
      xoxo Nicole

    • July 23, 2013 at 12:26 AM

      Yes, definitely ladoramartin, there will be one standard “gluten free bread flour blend” that will be the base for almost every recipe in the book. And it’s really the ingredients and long, slow refrigerator rise that lead to a smooth, taut surface on the bread. No real trick. Previously, I had just smoothed the top with wet fingers and it did the trick pretty well, but that doesn’t hold a candle to the new way. :)
      xoxo Nicole

  • Sue O.
    July 22, 2013 at 4:36 PM

    I’m hoping for a really great cinnamon roll recipe! Will there be one in your BIG, BAD Gluten-Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread book?

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:25 PM

      You better believe it, Sue! There are a couple recipes for those in my first and second books, too, if you want to get a jump on things. But with the new recipes and methods, of course it takes the whole thing up a notch. ;)
      xoxo Nicole

    • July 23, 2013 at 12:25 AM

      You better believe it, Sue! There are a couple recipes for those in my first and second books, too, if you want to get a jump on things. But with the new recipes and methods, of course it takes the whole thing up a notch. ;)
      xoxo Nicole

  • Katelyn Bronson
    July 22, 2013 at 4:31 PM

    I just preordered and I am SO excited!! We’re moving into a bigger apartment in our building in November and I’ll have a stove that can use more than one burner and the oven simultaneously! It’s the little things. I can’t wait to hear about the giveaways!

    • Katelyn Bronson
      July 22, 2013 at 4:36 PM

      Oh! And my question is whether Better Batter will still be a good go-to for the new recipes? I know there’s a lot of demand for make-your-own GF flour blends, but I personally like being able to order 50lbs at a time and not have to worry about keeping all the components on hand. Makes the baking everything from scratch thing a little bit easier for me.

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:23 PM

      For your flour question, Katelyn, I’ll go with the short answer: You can continue to use Better Batter as your base “all purpose gluten free flour.” You’ll only need to add a couple other things to it to make it into my “gluten free bread flour” blend that is used in nearly every recipe in the book. :) Sounds like November is going to be a big baking month for you – and that doesn’t sound like a little thing. It sounds like a big thing!!
      xoxo Nicole

    • July 23, 2013 at 12:23 AM

      For your flour question, Katelyn, I’ll go with the short answer: You can continue to use Better Batter as your base “all purpose gluten free flour.” You’ll only need to add a couple other things to it to make it into my “gluten free bread flour” blend that is used in nearly every recipe in the book. :) Sounds like November is going to be a big baking month for you – and that doesn’t sound like a little thing. It sounds like a big thing!!
      xoxo Nicole

  • Barbara Barthelette
    July 22, 2013 at 3:49 PM

    Just pre-ordered the bread book and am excitedly waiting until November for it! Only my husband is gluten-intolerant but I’m loving the challenge of revising my cooking and baking for the entire family. Congratulations on your new book. My copy will join my ‘library’ of your other books which I already own and use.

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:21 PM

      Hi, Barbara,
      Thank you so much! Your husband is lucky that you go all out for him – and I personally think that there is something special about the whole family being able to eat the same, fabulous food. Cheers to your husband’s health and your family’s eating well!
      xoxo Nicole

    • July 23, 2013 at 12:21 AM

      Hi, Barbara,
      Thank you so much! Your husband is lucky that you go all out for him – and I personally think that there is something special about the whole family being able to eat the same, fabulous food. Cheers to your husband’s health and your family’s eating well!
      xoxo Nicole

  • Krista
    July 22, 2013 at 3:49 PM

    I have your other 2 books and ordered your new one last week!!! so excited!!! I have made a couple of the breads and enjoy them soooo much! Thank you for your time and effort put into the books!

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:20 PM

      Thank you so much for the kind words, Krista – and for pre-ordering the new book. Your support really means a lot to me.
      xoxo Nicole

    • July 23, 2013 at 12:20 AM

      Thank you so much for the kind words, Krista – and for pre-ordering the new book. Your support really means a lot to me.
      xoxo Nicole

  • Marcy
    July 22, 2013 at 3:17 PM

    I’d love to have some tried and true GF bread recipes. I’ve been avoiding all bread products because of my egg intolerance. Can one make good bread without eggs? Or if there must be eggs, do the egg substitutes REALLY taste as good??

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:20 PM

      Well, Marcy, you’re in luck! Gluten free bread baking typically relies heavily upon eggs to create structure, mouth feel and rise. My previous bread recipes certainly have. However, with my new recipes and method in the new book, unless a recipe would otherwise already be enriched with eggs (like brioche or cloverleaf rolls), these recipes typically do not contain eggs.
      xoxo Nicole

    • July 23, 2013 at 12:20 AM

      Well, Marcy, you’re in luck! Gluten free bread baking typically relies heavily upon eggs to create structure, mouth feel and rise. My previous bread recipes certainly have. However, with my new recipes and method in the new book, unless a recipe would otherwise already be enriched with eggs (like brioche or cloverleaf rolls), these recipes typically do not contain eggs.
      xoxo Nicole

  • Barbara Orten
    July 22, 2013 at 2:58 PM

    Sounds great and I can’t wait. Ordering Now!

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:15 PM

      Thank you, Barbara!
      xoxo Nicole

    • July 23, 2013 at 12:15 AM

      Thank you, Barbara!
      xoxo Nicole

  • Ariana
    July 22, 2013 at 2:54 PM

    I am so excited! Do you know when the kindle version will be available for pre-order? As soon as it’s ready, I will pre-order it!

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:15 PM

      Hi, Ariana,
      I will have to check with my editor about when the kindle version will be available for preorder. I honestly don’t know – and don’t recall its being available for preorder at all with my previous two books. I will have to check – since it should be available for preorder just like the hard copy, right?
      xoxo Nicole

    • Ariana
      July 23, 2013 at 3:12 PM

      Thank you Nicole. Right, I figured you should be able to preorder digital copies too! But Amazon may not do that. I want it as soon as possible! :) I have both of your other cookbooks too. :) Please let me know what you find out!

    • Ginger
      October 28, 2013 at 4:25 AM

      Please do let us know when it’s available for Kindle preorder. I can’t wait to read it but I only buy digital now.

      I know I’ve preordered other Kindle books and they’re automatically loaded onto the Kindle when they’re released.

    • July 23, 2013 at 12:15 AM

      Hi, Ariana,
      I will have to check with my editor about when the kindle version will be available for preorder. I honestly don’t know – and don’t recall its being available for preorder at all with my previous two books. I will have to check – since it should be available for preorder just like the hard copy, right?
      xoxo Nicole

    • Ariana
      July 23, 2013 at 7:12 PM

      Thank you Nicole. Right, I figured you should be able to preorder digital copies too! But Amazon may not do that. I want it as soon as possible! :) I have both of your other cookbooks too. :) Please let me know what you find out!

  • JoAnn C.
    July 22, 2013 at 2:31 PM

    Wow! What a terrific birthday gift for me to buy myself. Thanks so very much. When I was baking before gluten-free, I used to use the “old dough” method for my breads and buns all the time. They were beautiful loaves back then. Any chance there will be a similar method like that in the new book? Thanks again, Nicole. Good work.
    xoxo JoAnn
    P.S. And I’m totally digging your new longer do.

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:14 PM

      Hi, JoAnn! Yes, our birthday month will be appropriately feted this year. :)
      And about the “old dough” method – I assume you mean does the method in the new book approximate baking with gluten bread? That is part of what is so exciting, actually. It isn’t exactly the same, but it is so similar that you can and should draw upon your previous experience baking gluten bread. And the whole thing is enjoyable and magical!
      xoxo Nicole
      P.S. Thanks! This ‘do has taken so long to grow out that I don’t think I’ll ever cut it super short again!

    • JoAnn C.
      July 22, 2013 at 9:42 PM

      Thanks Nicole. What a day you’re having.
      The “old dough” method is when you take about a golf ball size of the dough you’re making, (after the first rise for conventional bread dough), and wrap and freeze it. You then use this chunk of dough when making the next loaf. Adding that chunk of thawed dough during the mixing stage of a new loaf. Each time you make a loaf of bread you take a chunk of dough from the batch you’re making and save it for the next batch. Always using the “old dough” to help flavor the new. We didn’t use a biga but would often use this method to tenderize and flavor the bread.

    • July 23, 2013 at 12:14 AM

      Hi, JoAnn! Yes, our birthday month will be appropriately feted this year. :)
      And about the “old dough” method – I assume you mean does the method in the new book approximate baking with gluten bread? That is part of what is so exciting, actually. It isn’t exactly the same, but it is so similar that you can and should draw upon your previous experience baking gluten bread. And the whole thing is enjoyable and magical!
      xoxo Nicole
      P.S. Thanks! This ‘do has taken so long to grow out that I don’t think I’ll ever cut it super short again!

  • Andrea Baynes
    July 22, 2013 at 2:26 PM

    Would you be able to help navigate high altitude baking? I can never seem to find a recipe that adjusts to where i live!

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:12 PM

      High altitude baking is something that I have not been able to experiment with myself, I’m afraid, Andrea, since I live in downstate NY. If I ever find myself in a high altitude, I will absolutely bake and experiment!
      xoxo Nicole

    • July 23, 2013 at 12:12 AM

      High altitude baking is something that I have not been able to experiment with myself, I’m afraid, Andrea, since I live in downstate NY. If I ever find myself in a high altitude, I will absolutely bake and experiment!
      xoxo Nicole

  • Jean
    July 22, 2013 at 12:36 PM

    Do you proved the recipe for the gluten flour mis in the book? Am pre-ordering now…

    • Jean
      July 22, 2013 at 12:37 PM

      Sorry-I meant to say provide rather than proved-that spell checker

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:10 PM

      Oh I knew what you meant, Jean. And yes, the flour blends are broken down clearly in the book. :)
      xoxo Nicole

    • July 23, 2013 at 12:10 AM

      Oh I knew what you meant, Jean. And yes, the flour blends are broken down clearly in the book. :)
      xoxo Nicole

  • Beth
    July 22, 2013 at 4:23 PM

    Nicole, I love all of your recipes and have both of your cookbooks. I’ve always been nervous about baking bread but would love to try it out with your new cookbook….looking forward to pre-ordering the book.

    • July 23, 2013 at 12:10 AM

      Don’t be nervous, Beth! I’ll be with you the whole way. :)
      xoxo Nicole

  • Beth
    July 22, 2013 at 12:23 PM

    Nicole, I love all of your recipes and have both of your cookbooks. I’ve always been nervous about baking bread but would love to try it out with your new cookbook….looking forward to pre-ordering the book.

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:10 PM

      Don’t be nervous, Beth! I’ll be with you the whole way. :)
      xoxo Nicole

    • JoAnn C.
      July 22, 2013 at 9:48 PM

      Oh Beth,
      You so can do this. Try making the Japanese Milk bread, my fave from the blog, it’s easy peasy and so very soft and good. You’ll be an old pro in no time.

  • Kathleen
    July 22, 2013 at 12:20 PM

    I cannot wait to get this book! I have your first 2 books and already pre-ordered this though Barnes and Noble. Love your blog and all your incredible recipes. Thank you!

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:09 PM

      Thank you so much for the kind words, Kathleen. And for your enthusiasm and support!
      xoxo Nicole

  • Anneke
    July 22, 2013 at 12:15 PM

    You know how excited I am for this book! Between the new book and my new kitchen, I know where I will be this winter! Especially looking forward to the no rye rye, the monkey bread and the raised donuts! Thanks for all your hard work to create this for us!

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:09 PM

      You are ready to party, Anneke! Those recipes are 3 of my personal faves. You’re going to love them!
      xoxo Nicole

  • Kizzl
    July 22, 2013 at 12:13 PM

    I got a notification from Amazon ages before you put up the preview and preordered it immediately. I am so excited about this one!

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:09 PM

      Thank you so much, Kizzi!! I really appreciate it!
      xoxo Nicole

  • Jennifer Sasse
    July 22, 2013 at 11:53 AM

    YEA! I’m also super excited about the bread book. I would love to know the things I need have in order to be successful baking breads and bready things before the book comes (flours, tools, etc…).
    I want to know how I can store things for a long period of time? Par baking and then freezing would work out I think but I’m unsure of how to do it. Any tips?
    Thank you for doing this for the GEE EFF community. We all collectively need to send you a large heartfelt hug for all the hard work you do for us every day!

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:09 PM

      Hi, Jennifer! Okay, here goes:
      Flours: I have a flour blend that I call a Gluten Free Bread Flour blend, and you can use one of two base all-purpose flours to build it (along with two other components). One of those base all-purpose flours is my mock Better Batter blend (from the blog, which is also repeated in the book – although you can of course also just use Better Batter). The other is a simple 3-ingredient basic blend, with a bit of added xanthan gum. So, nothing we haven’t used before as the base.

      Tools: As I mention in the post, a stand mixer is very, very helpful, but you can achieve good results with a 5-speed KitchenAid hand mixer with dough hook attachments. Other than that, you will need either a home proofer to make the wild yeast starter—or a plain ol’ heating pad (really).
      Storing bread: I have a few recommendations in the book (including a recommended bag for freezing), but it’s mostly about eliminating air from the bag in which you are freezing bread, since that is what causes freezer burn. And making sure you don’t continually defrost and refreeze the same bread. Hope that helps!
      xoxo Nicole

    • Jennifer Sasse
      July 23, 2013 at 9:43 AM

      this is awesome! I already use better batter because you’re cookbooks are never more than 10 feet from me at all times while I’m at home and it’s a great flour mix to start with. I also have all the other random GF flours and stuff for random reasons. So I’m good there.

      I also have the brod and taylor proofer! YEA! but could use some help using that thing. I also have a kitchen aid stand mixer! double YEA!
      I’m so ready for this book!!! YEA YEA YEA!

    • Lynn A. Decker
      July 23, 2013 at 11:21 AM

      I just pre-ordered mine! Yay!

    • July 23, 2013 at 5:06 PM

      Thank you, Lynn!!
      xoxo Nicole

    • Jennifer S.
      July 23, 2013 at 1:43 PM

      this is awesome! I already use better batter because you’re cookbooks are never more than 10 feet from me at all times while I’m at home and it’s a great flour mix to start with. I also have all the other random GF flours and stuff for random reasons. So I’m good there.

      I also have the brod and taylor proofer! YEA! but could use some help using that thing. I also have a kitchen aid stand mixer! double YEA!
      I’m so ready for this book!!! YEA YEA YEA!

  • April
    July 22, 2013 at 11:48 AM

    here’s my question– what kind of FLOUR does this book usually recommend (before I pre-order it).

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:06 PM

      I have a flour blend that I call a Gluten Free Bread Flour blend, April, and you can use one of two base all-purpose flours to build it (along with two other components). One of those base all-purpose flours is my mock Better Batter blend (from the blog, which is also repeated in the book – although you can of course also just use Better Batter). The other is a simple 3-ingredient basic blend, with a bit of added xanthan gum. So, nothing we haven’t used before as the base.

  • JM
    July 22, 2013 at 11:26 AM

    Can the kneading be done in a bread machine instead of a mixer and then taken out and used that way?

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:05 PM

      Hi, JM, I do not use or recommend use of a bread machine. I find that they give very inconsistent results and bread machine brands vary significantly from one to another, making it very difficult to give general directions. However, I think you’ll find that, with my new bread methods and recipes, and the fact that the first rise happens entirely in the refrigerator in a covered bucket, this method is easy and convenient.

      Nicole

  • Michelle
    July 22, 2013 at 11:12 AM

    I am really looking forward to sourdough recipes. I am a Californian, and we love our sourdough! One of my friends makes the most beautiful gluten-filled sourdough loaves, and I am looking forward to being able to make gf ones for my house. So are you saying the focaccia is sourdough? My daughter just had the most amazing-looking sourdough focaccia when we were traveling last week. I would love to be able to make some for myself!

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:05 PM

      Oh, Michelle, you’ll be able to have your sourdough! The focaccia recipes are not, in fact, sourdough (but that would be a great idea – for a future recipe ;). But the focaccia, as it is, is so incredible (I think it’s my favorite of all), that your daughter will probably be asking for some of yours. :)
      xoxo Nicole

  • andrea
    July 22, 2013 at 10:50 AM

    How do u know who to add to the contests if amazon is handling all the pre orders? I am planning on pre ordering but it makes me wonder how we get added to the contests by pre-ordering

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:03 PM

      It will mostly be on the honor system, Andrea. And there will be details in other posts in the coming weeks and months for how to enter giveaways. Nothing specific has been announced yet. Don’t worry – I’ll trust you. ;)
      xoxo Nicole

  • Jackie Fretwell
    July 22, 2013 at 10:36 AM

    Hello Nicole, I am super excited about your new book. I have it pre-ordered already!! I’ve got your others, I am an avid follower of all things Nicole Hunn!! You are a Goddess my dear!!

    I am still trying desperately to perfect the white sandwich bread. It’s so frustrating, I can make two batches back to back, one will turn out perfect and the other will sink..I have the proofer, I use the flour by weight, I use all room temp ingredients, and still am left immobilized with fear to try and fail again. I have resorted to using store bought bread mixes, I am so ashamed. :( I have high hopes that this new book of yours will give me my confidence back to try again…I really am at a loss for words..there is nothing sadder than a deflated loaf of bread. :’-(

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:02 PM

      If you are experiencing inconsistent results, perhaps your oven temperature fluctuates from one loaf to the next? Generally, a loaf that rises and then falls is generally baked on the outside before it is baked and set enough on the inside to support the rise as it cools. Have faith, Jackie!
      xoxo Nicole

    • Jackie Fretwell
      July 23, 2013 at 6:11 PM

      Thanks, I will keep the faith. :)

    • Jackie Fretwell
      July 30, 2013 at 10:40 AM

      I did want to add also that the bread will sink within 10 min of me putting it into the oven. I also use an oven thermometer to make sure the oven is at the right temp. It happened again this last weekend. I’m very sad.

  • Donia Robinson
    July 22, 2013 at 10:15 AM

    Ever since I read (and made) your white bread recipe, I’ve been curious about the step of mixing it for 6-8 minutes to “activate” the xanthan gum. What does this do to it?

    Secondly, and this isn’t exactly within the scope of the book, but can you give some tips on how to keep up with the bread/baked good demands in a household? I know you wrote a blog post about it (and I read it, but I can’t find it right now), but when the bread comes out of the oven, I feel like I have a ticking time bomb on my hands. I do slice and freeze it if it isn’t eaten within a few days, but then it’s not quite as good. (Close, but not quite.) It’s kind of a drag to think, “Let’s do an easy dinner tonight – hot dogs!” and then realize you have to MAKE the buns. :( My kids loved the GF “wheat” thins, and they actually didn’t take as much time as I thought. But it’s still more time and energy than just grabbing a box off the shelf. (And the ones on the shelf are stable for much longer, of course.) I know you’re a busy mom as well, and was hoping for some tips!

    Can’t wait for the book!!

    • July 22, 2013 at 7:58 PM

      The mechanical mixing of a xanthan-gum containing mixture is to prevent xanthan gum from clumping in the mixture, and to hydrate all of the grains of xanthan gum to ensure its effectiveness.

      About bread baking, no homemade bread is going to taste as fresh after freezing or after a few days on the counter as it does soon after it cools from the oven. Here is the blog post on storing gluten free bread, for you to bookmark.

      xoxo Nicole

  • Bobbie Jo
    July 22, 2013 at 10:00 AM

    I have tried to bake so many different recipes of gf bread & almost gave up, b/c I was not satisfied. I was convinced that if I’m gf I will never eat delish bread again. Ty so much for this book! God bless you! :)

    • July 22, 2013 at 7:53 PM

      Oh, I see a bright gluten free bread future for you, Bobbie Jo!
      xoxo Nicole

  • Susan White
    July 22, 2013 at 9:54 AM

    I was wondering if your going put this out in Kindle format. I rarely buy print books because I love having the book on my Kindle where I can access the recipes while I’m in the store and get all the ingredients I need. I love your earlier book and am looking forward to your bread recipes!

    • July 22, 2013 at 7:53 PM

      Hi, Susan,
      Yes of course! The book will be available in kindle, nook and iBook formats all. Smart to use the kindle version in the store to go shopping!
      xoxo Nicole

  • WTFPinterest.com
    July 22, 2013 at 9:48 AM

    I am absolutely GIDDY about this book, Nicole! Congratulations! The work you had to put into this makes my head spin! I’ve pre-ordered, of course, and I cannot wait to bake from it! Does there happen to be a recipe for a sub (hoagie/grinder) roll in there? Also, anything like a Chamorro sweet roll? Thanks!

    OXO
    Allison

    • July 22, 2013 at 7:52 PM

      Thank you so much for your enthusiasm, Allison! It really, really means a lot. Of course there’s a recipe for a hoagie roll! And it’s absolutely one of my favorite recipes in the book. Wait ’till you see the photos! I’m not familiar with a Chamorro sweet roll, but from a quick google search perhaps it’s similar to a clover leaf roll? There are a few rolls that I think will fit the bill. :)
      xoxo Nicole

  • John Lachett
    July 22, 2013 at 9:43 AM

    Can. Not. Wait. I do have a book question, not sure if you would be able to answer this but will this book be avail for the Kindle like the others?
    I shouldn’t be this excited about bread!! Ack!! Darn you!!!
    Your GFF,
    John L

    • July 22, 2013 at 7:50 PM

      Hi, John, my GFF!
      Yes, of course, the book will be available in kindle, nook and iBook versions. If being excited about bread is wrong, then I don’t wanna be right. ;)
      xoxo Nicole

    • John Lachett
      July 23, 2013 at 11:03 AM

      Yay!! I actually just pre-ordered the hard copy just to be safe. That way I’ll have the hard copy in the kitchen and the kindle version can travel with me upstairs or anywhere else!!
      So. Excited.
      Your GFF,
      John L

  • Victoria S.
    July 22, 2013 at 9:17 AM

    Pre-ordered your new book and cannot wait to get it! Do you have any recipes in there that work in a bread machine? What type pans do you recommend? How do I enter your sweepstakes? ;)

    • July 22, 2013 at 7:49 PM

      Hi, Victoria,
      About the bread machine, as I mentioned below, I do not use or recommend use of a bread machine. I find that they give very inconsistent results and bread machine brands vary significantly from one to another, making it very difficult to give general directions. However, I think you’ll find that, with my new bread methods and recipes, and the fact that the first rise happens entirely in the refrigerator in a covered bucket, this method is easy and convenient.

      As far as loaf pans, I have used USA Pans in the past, but these days prefer the 1 pound Goldtouch loaf pans from Williams Sonoma. They measure 8 1/2 inches x 4 1/2 inches x 2 3/4 inches. For shaped breads, typically there is no special pan needed.

      There will be details about giveaways in the weeks and months to come. Nothing has been announced yet!

      xoxo Nicole

  • Leslie
    July 22, 2013 at 9:14 AM

    I am so exited for your book as it sounds wonderful! Will there be recipes for breads made from GF whole grains?

    • July 22, 2013 at 7:47 PM

      Hi, Leslie,
      Yes! There are whole grain bread recipes!
      xoxo Nicole

  • Angela Stone
    July 22, 2013 at 9:06 AM

    What type of flour do the recipes tend to use? Is it still better batter or would I need to be blending different flours?

    • July 22, 2013 at 7:47 PM

      I have a flour blend that I call a Gluten Free Bread Flour blend, Angela, and you can use one of two base all-purpose flours to build it (along with two other components). One of those base all-purpose flours is my mock Better Batter blend (from the blog, which is also repeated in the book – although you can of course also just use Better Batter). The other is a simple 3-ingredient basic blend, with a bit of added xanthan gum. So, nothing we haven’t used before as the base.

      Nicole

  • Mel
    July 22, 2013 at 8:54 AM

    I am so amazed, Nicole! The cover is beautiful – the inside preview is gorgeous. I cannot even begin to understand or imagine all the time and energy and bits of your soul you have poured into this book. It is truly going to change the gluten-free world. You rock! And I am so, so excited.

    • July 22, 2013 at 7:46 PM

      Aw, thanks so much, Mel. That really means a lot to me, especially coming from you. You know all about heart and soul!
      xoxo Nicole

  • Jessica
    July 22, 2013 at 8:46 AM

    What flours do you use? A mixture or specific brand? Thanks!

    • July 22, 2013 at 7:46 PM

      I have a flour blend that I call a Gluten Free Bread Flour blend, Jessica, and you can use one of two base all-purpose flours to build it (along with two other components). One of those base all-purpose flours is my mock Better Batter blend (from the blog, which is also repeated in the book – although you can of course also just use Better Batter). The other is a simple 3-ingredient basic blend, with a bit of added xanthan gum. So, nothing we haven’t used before as the base.

      Nicole

  • Heather Bigler
    July 22, 2013 at 8:45 AM

    Will your new book be available as a kindle version? I too would like to see bread machine versions of these recipes. Good luck with your new book!

    • July 22, 2013 at 7:44 PM

      Yes, yes, of course, Heather, it will be available for kindle, nook, and iBook.
      About the bread machine, as I mentioned below, I do not use or recommend use of a bread machine. I find that they give very inconsistent results and bread machine brands vary significantly from one to another, making it very difficult to give general directions. However, I think you’ll find that, with my new bread methods and recipes, and the fact that the first rise happens entirely in the refrigerator in a covered bucket, this method is easy and convenient.
      Nicole

    • Heather Bigler
      August 21, 2013 at 9:49 PM

      Thank you for your input, Nicole. I will attempt to make bread by hand. One never knows, I might just learn some patience amd skills while making your bread.

  • Abby
    July 22, 2013 at 8:40 AM

    Did you use Better Batter for this cookbook, or a mix of flours? I’d love to stock up slowly ($$) before crunch time when the cookbook gets here.

    • July 22, 2013 at 7:42 PM

      I have a flour blend that I call a Gluten Free Bread Flour blend, Abby, and you can use one of two base all-purpose flours to build it (along with two other components). One of those base all-purpose flours is my mock Better Batter blend (from the blog, which is also repeated in the book – although you can of course also just use Better Batter). The other is a simple 3-ingredient basic blend, with a bit of added xanthan gum. So, nothing we haven’t used before as the base. :)
      xoxo Nicole

  • Melissa L.
    July 22, 2013 at 8:37 AM

    What type of pans did you use for baking the breads? Very specifically, if possible. I have few cookie sheets, and each is different in size and finish…want an excuse to buy new ones. ;) Especially, what will be needed for donuts and bagels…..I’d really like to master these. Thanks so much!

    • July 22, 2013 at 7:40 PM

      You don’t need any special baking sheets, Melissa. I always use rimmed baking sheets for baking, and really any will do (although I really do like the Fat Daddio’s aluminum rimmed baking sheets). As far as loaf pans, I have used USA Pans in the past, but these days prefer the 1 pound Goldtouch loaf pans from Williams Sonoma. They measure 8 1/2 inches x 4 1/2 inches x 2 3/4 inches. My yeasted donuts and bagels do not require any special pans. :)
      xoxo Nicole

    • Melissa L.
      July 22, 2013 at 8:17 PM

      Thank very much, Nicole! I’m going to look into the recommended pans tonight!

    • July 22, 2013 at 8:23 PM

      Pleasure, Melissa. :)
      xoxo Nicole

    • Cheryl
      August 13, 2013 at 12:53 AM

      I should have also asked which book applies to the yeast breads/pizza dough?

    • August 19, 2013 at 1:16 PM

      Both books have recipes for yeast breads, Cheryl, but the second book concentrates a bit more on yeast-free breads, as they are faster and the book is entitled “Quick & Easy.”

    • Melissa L.
      July 23, 2013 at 12:17 AM

      Thank very much, Nicole! I’m going to look into the recommended pans tonight!

    • July 23, 2013 at 12:23 AM

      Pleasure, Melissa. :)
      xoxo Nicole

  • Tasneem
    July 22, 2013 at 8:31 AM

    Are any recipes egg free? Such a problem for us. And the flax seed slurry doesn’t give the lightness eggs do.
    Also hope there’s a recipe for croissant style rolls!! Am I asking for a lot??
    Also excited to see tortilla’s in the picture…hoping to make them as a roti substitute for my little one. Just hope they’re egg free.

    • Emily Wallner
      July 22, 2013 at 1:29 PM

      There is a corn tortilla recipe here on the blog already. There is also a flour tortilla recipe. They are delicious!

    • July 22, 2013 at 7:37 PM

      Hi, Tasneem,

      Most of the yeast bread recipes are, indeed, egg free. Generally, gluten free bread recipes rely heavily upon eggs to help create rise, structure and mouth feel. I have created a flour blend and a method that doesn’t call for eggs unless the recipe is for an inherently enriched bread, like brioche or cloverleaf rolls.
      The tortillas you see are a modification of the recipe for flour tortillas from my first book. They’re wonderful and yes, egg free. :)

      xoxo Nicole

  • Susan
    July 22, 2013 at 8:24 AM

    What tools will I need? I’ve never made bread before, but I want to make sure I have everything I need by the time my book arrives! Thanks!

    • July 22, 2013 at 7:35 PM

      Hi, Susan,
      I love your get-ready attitude! You won’t need much in the way of tools. As I state in the post, a stand mixer with a dough hook is best, but you can get very good results with a 5-speed KitchenAid handheld mixer with the dough hook attachments. And to make the wild yeast starter, you’ll need either a home proofer to create a controlled, warm environment to encourage yeast growth, or a heating pad. :)
      xoxo Nicole

  • Cori
    July 22, 2013 at 8:21 AM

    Ok, you’ve got me – what does “Pure levain sourdough” mean?

    I just got your first two books and already have this one pre-ordered (thank the Lord for a July birthday!) I’ve loved what I’ve made from Shoestring & Quick and Easy and I am SO EXCITED for this one! November can’t come quick enough!

    • July 22, 2013 at 7:33 PM

      A pure levain sourdough is a sourdough bread made without any commercial yeast, Cori. Commercial yeast is a single, isolated strain of yeast. Levain is made from a pure sourdough starter that is made with a mix of flour and water, and creates an environment conducive to growth of wild yeast in the flour (and to a smaller extent in the air). Glad you’re excited!
      xoxo Nicole

    • Cori
      July 22, 2013 at 10:13 PM

      Wow! I didn’t even know such a thing was possible! Thanks! Question #2 – as I’ve been reading your comments to others about the bread base flour you’ve mentioned using the Better Batter Mock here on the blog, or just using Better Batter (plus the 2 extra ingredients). Do you actually blend your own Better Batter Mock to use or do you still mostly use Better Batter? Is it truly more cost effective to blend your own (I know you’ve said the quality of all the components must be superb) or should I just buy the Better Batter original?

    • Cori
      July 23, 2013 at 2:13 AM

      Wow! I didn’t even know such a thing was possible! Thanks! Question #2 – as I’ve been reading your comments to others about the bread base flour you’ve mentioned using the Better Batter Mock here on the blog, or just using Better Batter (plus the 2 extra ingredients). Do you actually blend your own Better Batter Mock to use or do you still mostly use Better Batter? Is it truly more cost effective to blend your own (I know you’ve said the quality of all the components must be superb) or should I just buy the Better Batter original?

  • lisa
    July 22, 2013 at 8:18 AM

    can I make these im my bread machine ?

    • July 22, 2013 at 7:31 PM

      I do not use or recommend use of a bread machine, lisa. I find that they give inconsistent results with gluten free bread, and that bread machines vary significantly from one brand to another. However, I am sure others who really love their bread machines will try using them and report back after the book comes out!

  • Caisey
    July 22, 2013 at 8:15 AM

    What is the best yeast to use? When baking breads, I have had many issues with getting it to rise despite meticulously following the instructions. Help! – I can’t wait for the book. I am ready for some great bread! I enjoy your books and blog. Thank you for all the great recipes!

    • July 22, 2013 at 7:30 PM

      I have a whole section in the book on troubleshooting yeast bread baking, Caisey. Generally, if your bread is not rising, it is either the flour blend you are using (a very high starch blend will rise little if at all), the rising environment, or (more likely) not enough time. Yeast dough will rise, slowly, even in the refrigerator. I use Red Star instant yeast.
      Nicole

    • Caisey
      July 22, 2013 at 7:42 PM

      Thank you. I have been using Better Batter flour. I do live in a rather humid climate, though so maybe that is a problem. I will try the Red Star yeast.

  • Monika
    July 22, 2013 at 8:14 AM

    How many of the recipes are dairy free?

    • July 22, 2013 at 7:29 PM

      Hi, Monika, The yeast bread recipes are not gluten free, as the flour that I use as a “gluten free bread flour” contains dairy. However, I offer recommendations of the best dairy-free substitutes to use, after considerable experimentation.

Back to Top