Gluten Free Easter Menu 2014
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Right off the bat, you’ll notice that there are no main dishes on this, my 2014 Gluten Free Easter Menu. That’s because, well, this is really a baking blog. Every … more »

Right off the bat, you’ll notice that there are no main dishes on this, my 2014 Gluten Free Easter Menu. That’s because, well, this is really a baking blog. Every once in a while, someone gets *really* mad at me about that. Emotions can run really high on the Internet (why, I honestly have no idea)! But you and I both know that if I started posting a bunch of naturally gluten free cooking recipes, we’d all get pretty bored. Not to mention that some of you would get kind of mad at me for that. And anyway, there are tons of other resources for that (have you seen this brown sugar baked ham recipe from my friend Mel? It looks amazing). I want to give you back what you’re missing on a gluten free diet. When is nostalgic food more important than on a holiday like Easter? I’m gonna prove to you that, if they can make it with gluten, we can make it without. The sights, the smells, the tastes of holidays past? They’re still yours for the taking. So let’s get started, friends:

[If you've been reading this blog for a while, you know the drill with the clickable collage, but just in case—hover over each photo for the recipe title, then click the picture to open a new window with that post and the entire recipe]Gluten Free Easter Menu 2014

Here’s the 10¢ tour of these 8 Gluten Free Easter Recipes, with a little bit about what I love about each and why I think they should grace your Easter table (plus another set of links):

Gluten Free Texas Roadhouse-Style Rolls: I’m embarrassed to say that, when I first posted this recipe for what I can only describe as the best dinner rolls I have ever made (or, frankly, eaten), I didn’t really think about Easter. But I have you. And right away you told me. This belongs on every gluten free Easter table.

Gluten Free Hot Cross Buns: If Easter brings to mind one food, it’s these. My favorite hot cross buns recipe is on page 147 of GFOAS Bakes Bread. Or you can use the old recipe from the blog. It still works! Whatever you do, don’t forget the cardamom. It’s just … what makes the hot cross buns. Well, that, and the fact that there’s a cross on top. :/

Gluten Free Angel Biscuits: Can you hear the angels singing? I have posted more than just one biscuit recipe here on the blog, but I have honestly never seen you all get as excited about any others like you did about these. Is it because of the magic combination of baking powder, baking soda and yeast?! It’s darn near a religious experience, I tell ya.

Gluten Free Soft Frosted Cut-Out Sugar Cookies (in Easter shapes!): This recipe is an oldie but a goodie. This is basically my Gluten Free Lofthouse-Style Sugar Cookie recipe, but I gave the post a facelift with some new photos, including Easter cutout shapes. I get asked a lot if this dough can be cut out in all manner of shapes for all manner of occasions, so I figured I’d “show” rather than just “tell.”

Gluten Free Carrot Cake Cupcakes: I really did mean to test out this recipe for the very best carrot cake cupcakes you’ll ever have (so moist! so tender!) as an 8-inch or 9-inch round cake! I just haven’t done it yet. No excuses. Maybe you have? Tell us about it in the comments! For what it’s worth, even though muffins don’t always work as quick bread loaves (that loaf shape can be tricky in the baking department), cupcake recipes almost always work great as cakes (just increase the baking time, and watch it carefully), and vice versa.

Gluten Free Easter Chick Cupcakes: Have you ever made modeling chocolate? Maybe you didn’t know just how easy it is. Well, it’s really really (really) easy. And I think you should try it. It’s so easy to work with, you’ll be amazed. It holds together way easier than fondant does in these sort of shapes, and, well, it tastes, like, 100 times better.

Gluten Free Cinnamon Roll Sugar Cookies: These fancy, easy little sugar cookies, all dressed up like cinnamon rolls, are so much fun. It doesn’t hurt that they’re super impressive, but not a lot of work. Lots of bang, very little buck.

Gluten Free Lemon Pudding Cakes: Yesterday’s recipe for these light and airy, tangy little cakes-that-kind-of-taste-like-pudding just says spring. And spring says Easter. Follow me?

Love,
Me

 

P.S. If you don’t have your copy of Gluten Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread yet, won’t you grab one today? If you’re looking for the perfect recipe for Gluten Free Cinnamon Rolls for Easter morning, turn to page 166. :)

Recipe Available at: http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/gluten-free-easter-menu-2014/
Gluten Free Lemon Pudding Cakes
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One lovely reader (hi, Michelle!) asked me to post a recipe for gluten free lemon pudding cakes a year and a day ago (or at least it feels that way!), … more »

Gluten Free Lemon Pudding Cakes

One lovely reader (hi, Michelle!) asked me to post a recipe for gluten free lemon pudding cakes a year and a day ago (or at least it feels that way!), but not until I pinned a gluteny version to my Must Make Gluten Free Pinterest Board did I actually set about doing it. It’s not that I didn’t want to. It’s not that I didn’t have it on my ever-growing to-do list. It just … that announcing my intentions on that Pinterest board really seems to light a fire. I love it when you “vote” for recipes on there! And I love it when you make recipe suggestions. How much do I love it? So much that when my site gets something of a redesign in the next couple months, there is going to be a very obvious, very user-friendly Recipe Request Form. Right there in the sidebar. I hope you’ll give it a workout!

Lemon Sugar for Gluten Free Lemon Pudding Cakes

Oh, lemon sugar. It’s nothing more than lemon zest ground up with granulated sugar, but I swear it makes the whole house smell like a dream. It just smells like spring to me. Even when it’s winter. (I do know it’s spring as I write this, but maybe when you are reading it, it’s winter!).

Gluten Free Lemon Pudding Cakes
So. Lemon pudding cakes. They remind me a bit of this Self-Saucing Chocolate Pudding Cake. But light and lemony and tart and tangy. Perfect for Easter, right?

Gluten Free Lemon Pudding Cakes

I know that it can be a bit of a pain to bake something in a water bath, but it really helps these little soufflés bake up slowly and evenly. That way, you get a cake with a pudding-like texture. And the method is easy.

Gluten Free Lemon Pudding Cakes

Even though this is not much of a make-ahead sort of deal, you could blend up most of the ingredients ahead of time, and just whip and fold in the beaten egg whites right before you’re ready to bake and serve. I really like to serve these little cakes warm with a light dusting of confectioners’ sugar, but they are also fabulous with a dollop of whipped cream. Then again, what isn’t? Sometimes, when my children are driving me particularly crazy, I dollop them with whipped cream, and then we all feel better.

Prep time: 10 minutes       Cook time: 35 minutes       Yield: 6 servings
Ingredients

Zest of 1 lemon

3/4 cup (150 g) granulated sugar

1/4 cup (2 fluid ounces) freshly squeezed lemon juice (1 big, juicy lemon should do it)

3 eggs (180 g total, out of shells) at room temperature, separated

1 cup (8 fluid ounces) milk, at room temperature (any kind of milk should be fine, just not nonfat)

2 tablespoons (28 g) unsalted butter, at room temperature

1/2 cup (70 g) basic gum-free gluten free flour blend (46 g superfine white rice flour + 15 g potato starch + 9 g tapioca starch/flour)

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

Confectioners’ sugar, for dusting

Directions
  • Preheat your oven to 350°F. Grease 6 small (about 6-ounce) oven-safe jars or ramekins and place them in a large pan with at least 2-inch sides. Fill the pan with water that reaches about 1-inch up the sides of the greased jars or ramekins. Set the pan aside.

  • In a blender, place the lemon zest and granulated sugar. Blend until the zest is fully integrated into the sugar, and is very fragrant. Add 3 tablespoons of the lemon juice (reserving the final tablespoon), egg yolks (set the whites aside), milk, butter, flour blend and salt, and blend until the mixture is smooth. It will be a relatively thin liquid. Set the carafe of the blender aside while you beat the egg whites.

  • In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment (or a large bowl with a handheld mixer), place the egg whites. Beat on medium speed until the egg whites become frothy. Add the remaining tablespoon lemon juice, and continue to beat on medium-high speed until stiff (but not dry) peaks form. The addition of the remaining tablespoon of lemon juice to the egg whites as they beat creates fluffier and more stable whipped egg whites. Slowly pour the blender mixture of the other ingredients along the side of the bowl of whipped egg whites, and carefully fold the mixture in to the egg whites until few if any white streaks remain. Divide the mixture among the prepared jars or ramekins in the water bath. It will be very pourable.

  • Open the preheated oven and pull the lower rack out about half way. Carefully place the pan on the rack, and pour about another inch of water into the pan to bring the water bath a total of about 2-inches up the sides of the jars or ramekins. Push the oven rack all the way, close the door and bake until the cakes are puffed and very pale golden (about 35 minutes). Remove the pan from the oven, and transfer the cakes to a wire rack to cool for about 10 minutes before dusting lightly with confectioners’ sugar and serving warm. The cakes can be covered and stored in the refrigerator, but they will shrink a bit as they chill in the refrigerator.

  • Adapted from Food & Wine’s recipe for lemon pudding cakes, as selected by you from my Must Make Gluten Free Pinterest Board.

Love,
Me

 

P.S. If you haven’t yet, I hope you’ll consider picking up your copy of Gluten-Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread! It helps me keep the blog going, and it helps my publisher keep asking me to write more cookbooks!

Recipe Available at: http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/gluten-free-lemon-pudding-cakes/
Gluten Free Angel Biscuits
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I’m thinking that we might want to make some gluten free angel biscuits for Easter this Sunday. It seems … almost like a religious experience. If you’ve ever had trouble … more »

Gluten Free Angel Biscuits

I’m thinking that we might want to make some gluten free angel biscuits for Easter this Sunday. It seems … almost like a religious experience. If you’ve ever had trouble making biscuits (or, to be honest, even if you haven’t), then this is the pastry recipe for you. With baking powder, baking soda, and some yeast, they rise like angels. Get it?

Gluten Free Angel Biscuits

The temperature situation did pose a bit of a cognitive dissonance in my mind, to be honest. I mean, yeast likes warm, and pastry (like biscuits) needs cold fat (like butter) to expand in the oven. Pastry is really all about architecture as much as it is chemistry. The big chunks of cold butter, surrounded by flour, expand when they hit the warmth of the oven and push out the flour all around. Puff! But then how is the yeast supposed to proof??

Gluten Free Angel Biscuits

I’ll tell you how, sister (brother?).

Gluten Free Angel Biscuits

You handle the dough like you would any pastry (cold ingredients, light touch). Then we set the dough to rise in our usual warm, draft-free location, but we’ve used a bit less butter. That helps keep the dough together during the rise, without leaking. Then, right before it goes in the oven (after proofing), we shock it in the freezer! The result? See for yourself…

Gluten Free Angel Biscuits

Tender, light and flaky angel biscuits, with a bit of extra flavor from the yeast development—not to mention biscuit-rising insurance. Do you hear them singing?

Prep time: 15 minutes       Cook time: 12 minutes       Yield: 12 biscuits
Ingredients

2 cups (280 g) all-purpose gluten free flour (I like Better Batter or my mock Better Batter here)*, plus more for sprinkling

1 teaspoon xanthan gum (omit if your blend already contains it)

7 tablespoons (42 g) nonfat dry milk (blended into a fine powder)

4 tablespoons (36 g) cornstarch

1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

2 tablespoons (24 g) sugar

2 teaspoons (6 g) instant yeast

1 teaspoon kosher salt

6 tablespoons (84 g) unsalted butter, roughly chopped (about 1/2-inch dice will work) and chilled

1 cup (8 fluid ounces) buttermilk, chilled

*In place of the mock Better Batter + nonfat dry milk + cornstarch, you can use 2 1/2 cups (350 g) Cup4Cup gluten free flour, or my mock Cup4Cup blend.

Directions
  • Preheat your oven to 375°F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with unbleached parchment paper and set it aside.

  • In a large bowl, place the flour, xanthan gum, nonfat dry milk, cornstarch, baking powder, baking soda, sugar and yeast, and whisk to combine well. Add the salt, and whisk again to combine. Add the chopped and chilled butter, and toss to coat it in the dry ingredients. Flatten each chunk of butter between your thumb and forefinger. Create a well in the center of the dry ingredients and add the buttermilk, and mix until the dough begins to come together. If necessary, press together with floured hands, handling it as little as possible.

  • Turn out the dough onto a lightly floured piece of unbleached parchment paper and press into a disk. Place another piece of unbleached parchment paper on top of the dough, and roll out into a rectangle that is about 1 inch thick. Remove the top piece of parchment paper, sprinkle lightly with flour, and fold the dough over on itself like you would a business letter. Sprinkle the dough again lightly with flour, replace the parchment paper and roll out the dough once again into a rectangle about 1 inch thick. Once more, remove the top piece of parchment paper, sprinkle lightly with flour, and fold the dough over on itself like you would a business letter. Sprinkle the dough again lightly with flour, replace the parchment paper and roll out the dough, but this time into a disk about 1/2 inch thick. Peel back the top piece of parchment paper, and, using a floured 2 1/2-inch cookie or biscuit cutter, cut out rounds of dough. Place the rounds about 2 inches apart from one another on the prepared baking sheet. Gather and reroll the scraps, and cut out as many more round of dough as possible, as place on the prepared baking sheet. Cover with an oiled piece of plastic wrap, and place in a warm, draft-free location until nearly doubled in size (about 1 hour). Place the covered baking sheet in the freezer until firm (about 15 minutes).

  • Remove the baking sheet from the freezer place it in the center of the preheated oven. Bake until the biscuits are puffed, very fragrant and lightly golden brown around the edges (about 12 minutes). Remove from the oven and allow the biscuits to cool briefly on the baking sheet before serving.

Love,
Me

 

P.S. If you haven’t yet, please pick up your copy of Gluten-Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread! Your support keeps me going, in more ways than one!

Recipe Available at: http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/gluten-free-angel-biscuits/
“Neiman Marcus $250″ Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Cookies
20

 I love a good urban myth. Maybe it’s because I live (very very reluctantly) in the suburbs.* But whatever the origin on this recipe, these gluten free chocolate chip cookies are … more »

Neiman Marcus $250 Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Cookies

 I love a good urban myth. Maybe it’s because I live (very very reluctantly) in the suburbs.But whatever the origin on this recipe, these gluten free chocolate chip cookies are pret-ty delicious. See the flecks of chocolate? There is apparently a fair amount of disagreement about whether those belong in these mythical cookies. I tried them both with, and without. With is definitely superior. And I’m not usually one for packing a chocolate chip cookie with nuts, even though I love nuts, but I have to say that I rather enjoyed the nuts here. And of course, the oat flour is key. It makes them rather like our Mrs. Fields-Style Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Cookies, but these CCCs are different enough to stand on their own.

*If you want to read the legend of the “Famous” Neiman Marcus $250 Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe, scroll down to just above the recipe. 

Neiman Marcus $250 Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Cookies

I know it seems kind of annoying to have to chill, then grate, then chill the milk chocolate all over again. It’s just that, if you don’t, you end up with something of an unpleasant cross between a chocolate chip cookie, and a double chocolate chip cookie. And it’s just neither here nor there. Trust me. I speak from unfortunate personal experience.

Neiman Marcus $250 Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Cookies

You want the chocolate flecks to stay, well, flecked. Know what’s funny, though? The Neiman Marcus recipe on their website doesn’t mention grated milk chocolate at all. Shame, really. I think it totally makes the cookie.

Neiman Marcus $250 Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Cookies

Now for that myth: As the story goes, a woman and her daughter (or a man and his daughter—see? *myth*) had just finished their lunch at a Neiman Marcus cafe, including a chocolate chip cookie. The woman (or man!) loved the cookies so much she (he!) asked for the recipe and was told it could only be had for a fee of “two-fifty.” She (he!) agreed, only to later find out that it was $250, not $2.50. She (he!) complained to Neiman Marcus, and was told that they wished to keep the recipe rarified, not available to all. So she (he!) shared the recipe far and wide, as a way to thumb her (his) nose at the terribly snobbish Neiman Marcus. Neiman Marcus maintains that this story is simply untrue. I’m inclined to believe them. Then again, it is a pretty snobbish store…

Prep time: 10 minutes       Cook time: 10 minutes       Yield: 30 cookies
Ingredients

3 ounces milk chocolate, chilled until mostly frozen

1 cup (140 g) all purpose gluten free flour (I used Better Batter)

1/2 teaspoon xanthan gum (omit if your blend already contains it)

1 cup (120 g) certified gluten free oat flour (I grind 120 grams of certified gluten free rolled oats into a fine powder in a blender or food processor)

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1/2 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

6 ounces semi-sweet chocolate chips

4 ounces chopped raw nuts (I used peanuts, but almonds, pecans or walnuts all work well)

8 tablespoons (112 g) unsalted butter, at room temperature

1/2 cup (100 g) granulated sugar

1/2 cup (108 g) packed light brown sugar

1 egg (60 g, out of shell) at room temperature, beaten

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1 tablespoon milk (any kind), at room temperature (plus more if necessary by the teaspoon)

Directions
  • Preheat your oven to 375°F. Line rimmed baking sheets with unbleached parchment paper, and set them aside.

  • Using a standard grater or very sharp knife, grate or finely chop the cold milk chocolate into a bowl. Working with the chocolate when it’s cold makes it much easier to chop or grate it into pieces that don’t melt together. Cover the bowl and place it in the refrigerator to chill until you are ready to add the chocolate to the cookie dough.

  • In a medium-size bowl, place the flour, xanthan gum, oat flour, salt, baking powder and baking soda, and whisk to combine well. In a separate, small bowl, place the chocolate chips and chopped nuts, and toss with 1 tablespoon of the dry ingredients. Set both bowls aside.

  • In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (or a large bowl with a handheld mixer), cream the butter on medium-high speed until it is light and fluffy. Add the granulated sugar and brown sugar, and then the egg and vanilla and beat on medium-high speed until the mixture is smooth and light. Add the dry ingredients and the milk, and mix on medium speed until just combined. If the dough is very, very stiff, add more milk by the teaspoon until it can be stirred without too much difficulty. Add the chocolate chips and nuts, and mix by hand until they are evenly distributed throughout the dough. Remove the grated/chopped chocolate from the refrigerator, uncover it, and fold it carefully into the cookie dough, taking care not to melt it.

  • Divide the dough into balls about 1 1/2-inches in diameter. With the bottom of a glass, press down the balls of dough into disks, and place about 2 inches apart on the prepared baking sheets. One baking sheet at a time, place in the center of the preheated oven and bake until just set (8 to 10 minutes). Remove from the oven and allow to cool on the baking sheet for 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.

  • Adapted from this food.com recipe for the famous Neiman Marcus $250 cookies, which seems to be quite different from this actual Neiman Marcus recipe. Either way, you “voted” for it on my Must Make Gluten Free Pinterest Board!

Love,
Me

 

P.S. If you haven’t yet, pick you your copy of Gluten Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread! Thank you a million times over for all your support!!

Recipe Available at: http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/neiman-marcus-gluten-free-chocolate-chip-cookies/
Native American-Style Gluten Free Fry Bread
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There is a particular conventional flour that is supposedly the secret to the perfectly authentic Native American Fry Bread. Clearly, we can’t use that. But that doesn’t mean we can’t … more »

Native American-Style Gluten Free Fry Bread

There is a particular conventional flour that is supposedly the secret to the perfectly authentic Native American Fry Bread. Clearly, we can’t use that. But that doesn’t mean we can’t have Native American-Style Gluten Free Fry Bread. Now we’ve been talking about this recipe for a looooooong time here and there on the blog (and on Facebook), and I know that many of you have plenty of experience with fry bread. I hope I’ve done you proud!

Native American-Style Gluten Free Fry Bread

My family and I ate this, the winningest recipe for gluten free fry bread among the versions that I made, with a light dusting of confectioners’ sugar. Next time? I’m definitely making fry bread tacos. Fried until lightly golden, it won’t crumble at all when you bite into it. Remember, it’s fry bread—not a crispy taco. It almost reminds me of our gluten free chalupas.

Native American-Style Gluten Free Fry Bread

My little 8-year-old hand model was all too happy to dig in to some of it before her brother and sister. To the model … belong the spoils.

Native American-Style Gluten Free Fry Bread

This dough happens to be super supple and surprisingly easy to work with. So easy, in fact, that I’m considering playing around with it to see what else it can do.

Native American-Style Gluten Free Fry Bread

A few program notes: I prefer to deep fry these, rather than shallow fry them. Shallow frying makes for much more oily fried foods. Be sure the oil is hot enough (but not too hot—watch the temp on that candy/deep fry thermometer), so the dough seals on the outside in the very early moments of frying. For plenty of frying tips, see the directions in this post. If you have made fry bread before, though, and have your own favorite way of shallow frying it, go for it! You’re the boss.

Prep time: 15 minutes       Cook time: 15 minutes       Yield: 6 fry breads
Ingredients

2 1/2 cups + 2 tablespoons (368 g) all-purpose gluten free flour (I strongly recommend Better Batter or my mock Better Batter blend)

1 1/4 teaspoons xanthan gum (omit if your blend already contains it)

6 tablespoons (54 g) Expandex modified tapioca starch (I don’t recommend it, but you can replace this with an equal amount, by weight, of regular tapioca starch/flour)*

1 tablespoon baking powder

1 teaspoon (3 g) instant yeast

1 tablespoon (12 g) granulated sugar

1 1/2 (9 g) teaspoons kosher salt

2 tablespoons (24 g) vegetable shortening (I use Spectrum nonhydrogenated vegetable shortening, but any kind will do), melted and cooled

3/4 cup (6 fluid ounces) warm milk (about 95°F)

3 ounces warm water (about 95°F), plus more by the teaspoon as necessary

Oil, for frying

Confectioners’ sugar, for dusting

*For information on where to find Expandex, please see the Resources page. I have not yet tested Ultratex 3 in this recipe, but if you would like to try it in this recipe, I recommend using 18 grams of Ultratex 3 in place of the Expandex (1/3 the amount of Expandex called for), and then making up the remaining 36 grams of weight in more all purpose gluten free flour. So it would be 404 grams all purpose gluten free flour + 18 grams Ultratex 3. Ultratex 3 is at least 3 times as strong as Expandex.

Directions
  • In a large bowl, place the flour blend, xanthan gum, Expandex, baking powder, yeast and granulated sugar, and whisk to combine well. Add the salt, and whisk again to combine. Create a well in the center of the dry ingredients, add the melted shortening, milk and water and mix to combine until the dough comes together. With clean hands, squeeze the dough together into a ball. It should hold together well, and not be so stiff that it is hard to knead. If it is hard to knead, add more water by the teaspoonful, kneading it in after each addition, until the dough is pliable but still holds together very well. Transfer the dough to a large piece of plastic wrap, and wrap tightly. Allow to rest at room temperature for 15 minutes.

  • Unwrap the dough and divide it into 6 equal portions, each about 4 ounces. On a large, flat surface, roll each piece of dough into a ball and, with a rolling pin, roll into a round about 6 inches in diameter and about 1/4-inch thick. For perfectly uniform rounds, cut off the rough edges with a 6-inch cake cutter. The lid of a pot in the proper size should work, too. Place the rounds in a single layer, about 2 inches apart from one another, on a flat surface covered in unbleached parchment paper. Cover with lightly oiled plastic wrap, and allow to rise for 30 minutes or until beginning to puff.

  • While the dough is rising, place 2 inches of oil in a heavy-bottom saucepan. Clip a candy/deep fry thermometer to the side of the saucepan, and bring the oil to 350°F. Place the risen rounds of dough, one at a time, in the hot oil and fry until lightly golden brown on both sides (about 1 minute per side). The dough will bubble and puff. Tongs are useful in flipping the dough from one side to the other, but take care not to pierce the dough with the tongs or oil will rush in to the dough and your bread will be quite oily. Remove the dough from the oil, and place on paper towel-lined plates to drain. Dust lightly with confectioners’ sugar and serve warm.

  • Adapted from the recipe for Gluten Free Flour Tortillas from Gluten Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread (reprinted here), and from Navajo Fry Bread recipes from allllll over the Internet, including this one.

Love,
Me

 

P.S. If you haven’t yet, pick you your copy of Gluten Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread! Your support means everything.

Recipe Available at: http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/native-american-style-gluten-free-fry-bread/
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