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Perfect Gluten Free Chocolate Cupcakes

Perfect Gluten Free Chocolate Cupcakes

If you need to make gluten free chocolate cupcakes and you only want the best, easy recipe, the search is over! These perfectly moist and tender cakes are even naturally dairy free.

When you need to make gluten free chocolate cupcakes and you only want the best, easy recipe, these perfectly moist and tender cakes are the only treats you need!

Whenever one of my 3 children has a birthday coming up, the most important question is always the same: What sort of birthday cake this year? You can’t very well celebrate ūüéȬ†without cake (can you?).

The lucky ducks, they know of all manner of cakes and can never seem to choose easily. An embarrassment of riches! To help narrow things down, I begin by asking them to pick a lane: chocolate or vanilla. Within each lane, there are endless varieties, but it does help to create a fork ūüćī¬†in the road.

Above all, though, I try to talk them into cupcakes instead of a cake. Cupcakes are so easy to make, store, transport and even eat! A perfect gluten free chocolate cake¬†is, of course, a favorite year after year. But you can’t beat a cupcake for ease of storage‚ÄĒboth before serving and if there are leftovers.

Of course, I have a simple and reliable recipe for gluten free vanilla cupcakes, if you’ve got a vanilla sort of birthday boy or girl. In fact, I’m usually a vanilla cake sort of girl. But these chocolate¬†cupcakes are deep and chocolatey without ever being too rich. In other words, they’re truly perfect.

When you need to make gluten free chocolate cupcakes and you only want the best, easy recipe, these perfectly moist and tender cakes are the only treats you need!

What makes this recipe so easy

Since the only ingredient that has to be brought to room temperature is the eggs, this is the sort of recipe that is so easy to make at the last minute. If you’ve forgotten to leave eggs out on the counter in advance, just float two eggs in very warm (but not hot) water for about 10 minutes before proceeding with the recipe.

This recipe is made in one single bowl. The dry ingredients, plus the sugar, are whisked together, then the wet ingredients are added all at once. Finally, the smooth batter is whisked together. That’s it.

Leftovers can be cooled completely, then frozen in a single layer on a baking sheet before being piled into a freezer-safe zip-top bag and stored in the freezer. Just defrost them at room temperature before frosting and serving.

When you need to make gluten free chocolate cupcakes and you only want the best, easy recipe, these perfectly moist and tender cakes are the only treats you need!

A word about frosting

A classic buttercream frosting is a wonder of simplicity, made with little more than butter (or a mix of butter and shortening) and confectioners’ sugar. It can even be made into chocolate buttercream by adding melted chocolate and/or unsweetened cocoa powder. But I rarely make buttercream frosting. ūüėģ

I find that it’s just too sweet, no matter how I make it. The confectioners’ sugar not only provides sweetness, but it also provides structure to the frosting. So skimping on sugar just really isn’t an option.

Buttercream does look beautiful in photos, so I will make it for that purpose. But when I’m making frosting for taste, rather than for looks, I prefer a whipped chocolate ganache (recipe below) for chocolate and my cooked flour vanilla frosting for vanilla. Both have much less sugar than buttercream, and lovely flavor.

When you need to make gluten free chocolate cupcakes and you only want the best, easy recipe, these perfectly moist and tender cakes are the only treats you need!

These cupcakes rise to a relatively flat top, as they should when they are meant as a vehicle for frosting. They’re not muffins, after all. They’re cupcakes, and they should behave accordingly!

If it’s particularly important to you that the cupcakes don’t rise above the liners, just be sure to fill each well a scant 2/3 of the way full. I simply divide the batter evenly among the 12 muffin wells since I don’t want to have any leftover batter.

When you need to make gluten free chocolate cupcakes and you only want the best, easy recipe, these perfectly moist and tender cakes are the only treats you need!

Ingredients and Substitutions

This is a very, very simple recipe. I recommend making it as written if at all possible. But if you have additional dietary preferences and requirements, here are my educated guesses about making substitutions.

Dairy-free: The cupcake portion of this recipe is naturally dairy free, as it calls for a neutral oil instead of butter. If you choose to use 1/2 cup of milk in place of the 1/2 cup of water in the recipe, just use a nondairy milk (provided it is not nonfat and is unsweetened).

To make the whipped ganache frosting dairy free, just use dairy-free chopped chocolate and full fat canned coconut milk in place of heavy whipping cream. The ganache will be slightly less smooth and easy to pipe, but it will still work!

Egg-free: These cupcakes call for 2 eggs in 12 cupcakes, which is at the upper limit of my recommendations for using a “chia egg” as an egg replacement. A “chia egg” is simply 1 tablespoon ground chia seeds mixed with 1 tablespoon lukewarm water, and allowed to gel. I haven’t tried the recipe with this replacement, though, so you’ll have to experiment!

Click play ‚Ė∂ÔłŹ¬†and watch ¬†me make and frost these cupcakes!

Then it’s your turn!

When you need to make gluten free chocolate cupcakes and you only want the best, easy recipe, these perfectly moist and tender cakes are the only treats you need!
Prep time: Cook time: Yield: 12 cupcakes

Ingredients

Whipped Ganache Frosting
3/4 cup (6 fluid ounces) heavy whipping cream, plus more as necessary

10 ounces dark chocolate, chopped

Chocolate Cupcakes
3/4 cup (105 g) all purpose gluten free flour (I used Better Batter)

1/2 teaspoon xanthan gum (omit if your blend already contains it)

1/2 cup + 1 tablespoon (45 g) unsweetened natural cocoa powder

3/4 teaspoon baking powder

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

3/4 cup (150 g) granulated sugar

4 tablespoons (56 g) vegetable or other neutral oil

2 eggs (100 g, weighed out of shell) at room temperature, beaten

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1/2 cup (4 fluid ounces) lukewarm water or milk, at room temperature

Directions

  • Make the ganache first so it can cool. In a small, heavy-bottom saucepan, heat the heavy whipping cream until it just begins to simmer. Place the chopped chocolate in a medium-size bowl, and pour the hot cream over the chocolate. Allow the cream to sit on the chocolate for about a minute, until the chocolate begins to melt, and mix until the chocolate is melted and the mixture is smooth and glossy. Allow the ganache to cool at room temperature until firm enough to scoop with a spoon.
  • Make the cupcakes. Preheat your oven to 350¬įF. Line the wells of a standard 12-cup muffin tin and set it aside.

  • In a large bowl, place the flour, xanthan gum, cocoa powder, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and sugar, and whisk to combine well. Create a well in the center, and add the oil, eggs, and water (or milk), and whisk to combine well. The batter should be smooth and relatively thin.¬†

  • Fill the prepared wells of the cupcake tin about 2/3 of the way full and shake back and forth to distribute the batter evenly in each well. Place the tin in the center of the preheated oven, and bake for about 19 minutes, or until the cupcakes spring back when pressed lightly in the center. Remove from the oven and allow to sit in the pan for at least 10 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.

  • Right before you‚Äôre ready to frost the cupcakes, transfer the cooled chocolate ganache to a large bowl and beat with a handheld mixer or stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment until thickened¬†and fluffy. The ganache¬†will also lighten in color. If it seems to be at all crumbly or not smooth, add more heavy whipping cream by the teaspoonful and beat to combine. Frost immediately and serve.

  • Freeze any leftover cupcakes, unfrosted, in a sealed freezer-safe container. Defrost at room temperature, then frost and serve.

Love,
Nicole

Gluten Free Brown Bread

Gluten Free Brown Bread

Hearty and “wheaty” tasting, this gluten free brown bread recipe is sure to be a family favorite. It couldn’t be easier, and you don’t need a bread machine!

Hearty and "wheat-y" tasting, this gluten free brown bread recipe is sure to be a family favorite. It couldn't be easier, and you don't need a bread machine!

A good, hearty gluten free bread with a thick but soft crust is way harder to find than it should be. By the way, who are these children who don’t eat crusts?

I’m pretty sure that my kid would eat your kid’s crusts. Especially if they came from this bread.¬†Hearty and “wheat-y” with just the right amount of molasses and whole grain teff, this gluten free bread is sure to be a fast favorite.

Hearty and "wheat-y" tasting, this gluten free brown bread recipe is sure to be a family favorite. It couldn't be easier, and you don't need a bread machine!

Batter-Style Gluten Free Breads

When my son first started eating¬†gluten free in 2004, we mail-ordered gluten free bread from Canada. That wasn’t because it was so good we couldn’t help ourselves. It was just all there was.

Five years later, in 2009, I stumbled upon a recipe that was known as “Tom’s Bread” on the Internet. I think I first found it in an online chat room, although I simply can’t recall where that would have been. That was back in the days when the “gluten free listserv” was the best (and nearly only) source of gluten free product information out there.

Tom’s Bread is a batter-style bread that I believe Tom himself maintains was the product of divine intervention. It relies heavily¬†on garbanzo bean flour, a flour I now find truly repulsive unless it’s in, say, hummus. But it also was prescient in its use of equal amounts of cornstarch and tapioca flour.

And Tom’s bread was a batter-style gluten free bread. A couple years later, I would go on to develop the recipe for Gluten Free White Sandwich Bread that was published in my first cookbook (did you know there’s a second edition of that book coming out very, very soon?). It relies upon a rice flour blend (no bean flour!), but it’s also a batter-style gluten free bread.

These bread¬†doughs are made in a mixer and resemble cookie dough. The dough is very, very wet, and can’t be shaped in the way conventional¬†bread doughs¬†are shaped. ¬†Until I wrote Gluten Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread, that was the only sort of gluten free bread recipe I had ever heard of.

Even though I am still asked about it from time to time, I maintain that bread machines are a waste of money. They vary a ton from brand to brand, and one recipe will work well in one machine and not in another. Plus, the machines are crazy expensive and make an odd-shaped loaf.

Hearty and "wheat-y" tasting, this gluten free brown bread recipe is sure to be a family favorite. It couldn't be easier, and you don't need a bread machine!

These batter-style bread recipes still work. And this hearty gluten free brown bread recipe, a batter-style bread, is no exception. They have only one rise, and they tend to rise quickly because the dough is super wet. High hydration means that yeast grows readily.

In fact, most recipes for gluten free bread that you’ll find elsewhere on the Internet (and in cookbooks that aren’t, well, mine), are in this style. I hadn’t made one of these recipes in years‚ÄĒand then I started working on the second edition of my very first cookbook.

They don’t have the yeasty taste that you get from a slow refrigerator rise, and they don’t have the same chew. But they make a lovely sandwich. And they’re a great starting place if you’re hesitant to make yeast bread (gluten free or otherwise). And this gluten free brown bread recipe even has some real depth of flavor because of the addition of oat flour, whole grain teff and molasses.

Hearty and "wheat-y" tasting, this gluten free brown bread recipe is sure to be a family favorite. It couldn't be easier, and you don't need a bread machine!

Ingredients and Substitutions

Except where I’ve specifically indicated that I’ve tried the substitution, these pearls are just my best educated guesses about how to satisfy other dietary needs beyond just being gluten free. My recipes are only reliably gluten free, by design, and not free of everything. So take this information in the spirit in which it’s offered‚ÄĒand do your own experimentation!

Dairy-Free:¬†It’s easy to make this recipe dairy free. Just replace the butter in the recipe with either butter-flavored Spectrum nonhydrogenated vegetable shortening or Earth Balance buttery sticks. And use any unflavored, unsweetened nondairy milk (as long as it isn’t nonfat). Done!

Egg-Free: There are two egg whites in this recipe, but I’ve also successfully made it with one whole egg. That leads me to believe that you could make it with one “chia egg” instead. A chia egg is 1 tablespoon chia flour mixed with 1 tablespoon lukewarm water and allowed to sit until it gels.

Oat-Free:¬†That’s always a tough one. Maybe try replacing the oat flour with sorghum?

Whole Grain Teff: This recipe calls for whole grain teff, not teff flour. I have wondered whether it would work with teff flour, though. And whether whole grain teff could be replaced with, say, chia seeds. I bet it could!

Click Play ‚Ė∂ÔłŹ¬†Below And Watch Me Make This Easy Gluten Free Bread

Then it’s your turn!

Hearty and "wheat-y" tasting, this gluten free brown bread recipe is sure to be a family favorite. It couldn't be easier, and you don't need a bread machine!
Prep time: Cook time: Yield: 1 loaf of bread

Ingredients

2 1/2 cups (350g) all purpose gluten free flour (I used Better Batter)

1 1/4 teaspoons xanthan gum (omit if your blend already contains it)

3 tablespoons (38g) whole grain teff

1/2 cup + 1  tablespoon (68 g) certified gluten free oat flour (I just grind old fashioned gluten free rolled oats into a powder)

1/4 teaspoon cream of tartar

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

2 tablespoons (25 g) granulated sugar

1 tablespoon (9 g) instant yeast

1 1/2 teaspoons (9 g) kosher salt

5 tablespoons (70 g) unsalted butter, at room temperature

1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

1 tablespoon (21 g) unsulphured molasses

2 egg whites (50 g), at room temperature

1 1/2 cups (12 fluid ounces) warm milk, about 95¬įF

Directions

  • Grease and line a standard 9-inch x 5-inch loaf pan and set it aside.

  • In the bowl of your stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, place the flour, xanthan gum, teff, oat flour, cream of tartar, baking soda, sugar and yeast. Whisk with a separate handheld whisk to combine well. Add the salt and whisk again to combine.

  • Add the butter, vinegar, molasses, egg whites and milk, and mix on low speed with the paddle attachment until the dough starts to come together, then mix on high for about 5 minutes. Transfer the dough to the prepared loaf pan and smooth the top with a wet spatula. Cover the dough with oiled with plastic wrap and place in a warm, draft-free area to rise until the dough is about 150% of its original volume. When the dough is nearly finished rising, preheat your oven to 375¬įF.

  • Remove the plastic wrap and place the loaf pan in the center of the preheated oven. Bake for about 30 minutes or until the loaf is firm enough to take out of the pan. Remove the bread from the loaf pan and place it on a rimmed baking sheet. Return the bread on the pan to the oven, and bake for another 5 to 10 minutes, or until the top is nicely browned and the loaf sounds hollow when tapped. Remove from the oven, allow to cool on the baking sheet for 10 minutes. Transfer to a wire rack to cool completely before slicing and serving.

  • Originally published on the blog in 2012. Recipe tweaked only slightly, most photos new, video new, text mostly new.

Love,
Nicole

Master Granola Bar Recipe

Master Granola Bar Recipe

If you’ve ever wondered how you make homemade granola bars, this master granola bar recipe is for you. Make them chewy, crunchy or even no bake.

This is a comprehensive look at how to make granola bars of every type. If you’d like to skip to the bottom line, and then bookmark it for later use, scroll down to the bottom for the recipe! For everyone else, let’s talk granola bar recipes!

If you've ever wondered how you make homemade granola bars, this master granola bar recipe is for you. Make them chewy, crunchy or even no bake!

I make homemade granola bars every month of the year. But when it’s back-to-school time, I kick it into high gear. They’re perfect for breakfast, popping into lunch boxes (I have plenty of nut-free varieties), and just grabbing when we’re running out the door to practice, a game or an urgent I-need-a-special-pen-for-chemistry emergency.

My kids’ favorite granola bar varieties are the kinds that have the most sugar. Crispy and crunchy or soft and chewy, they might have some preferences around the edges. But I know they’re mostly in it for the sweet stuff.

I’ve published so many granola¬†recipes, for the loose stuff and for the bars, over the years that I’ve got it down to a science. Actually, it’s one area of baking where you don’t need a super-strict formula, so I guess it’s more art than science.

When I make granola bars, I find that there are broad categories of ingredients that are largely interchangeable. So I thought I would share my granola bar philosophy with you, if you’re interested. Let’s get to it!

The Mix Ins

If you've ever wondered how you make homemade granola bars, this master granola bar recipe is for you. Make them chewy, crunchy or even no bake!

If you take a look at the photo above, you’ll find the biggest category of granola ingredients, by far: the mix-ins. All of these ingredients are raw (whenever possible) and unsalted. That way, we can flavor them to our liking.

From the top left in rows from left to right, you’ll find:

  • roughly chopped raw almonds
  • roughly chopped raw cashews (buy cashew pieces, though! cheaper and easier)
  • chocolate chips
  • pumpkin seeds
  • slivered raw almonds
  • pecan pieces
  • small, dried fruit (like raisins, dried blueberries, chopped dried prunes or apricots)
  • coconut flakes (I only use flakes in granola and granola bars, not shredded coconut, which tastes like dental floss in granola)
  • chopped peanuts

But you should use your imagination! In no-bake granola bars, since you won’t be baking any of these raw nuts and seeds, you can toast them first. I like to toast nuts and seeds either on a baking sheet in a 300¬įF oven until fragrant or in a cast iron pan until fragrant.

In crunchy granola bars, raw nuts are first ground into flour before baking with them. It’s amazingly useful in creating a crunchy bar that has the protein and fats of nuts without the pieces.

The Sugars

If you've ever wondered how you make homemade granola bars, this master granola bar recipe is for you. Make them chewy, crunchy or even no bake!

If there’s a way to make granola bars without sugar, I don’t know what it is. Sugar performs tons of important functions in granola bars. At the top of the list is that it holds the bars together when it’s heated. And, of course, it adds sweetness and even some depth (depending upon the sugar).

You can use refined and/or unrefined sugars in granola and granola bars. The more important distinction for baking success comes from whether you’re using liquid or granulated sugars.

Clockwise from the top left in the photo above, you’ll find these sugars:

  • Finely ground coconut palm sugar (ground finer in a food processor or blender) (unrefined)
  • (Normal) coconut palm sugar (a darker color, and a much more coarse grind) (unrefined)
  • Light brown sugar (refined)
  • Pure maple syrup (unrefined)
  • Unsulphured molasses (refined)
  • Honey (unrefined, but not raw)
  • White granulated sugar (the most refined!)

Whenever possible, I use unrefined sugars in granola and granola bars. I feel better about giving them to my children as they have some nutrients and tend to be more satisfying. Plus, they have much more depth of flavor than highly refined sugars like white granulated sugar. And brown sugar is simply white granulated sugar with molasses added to it anyway.

Plus, they have much more depth of flavor than highly refined sugars like white granulated sugar. And brown sugar is simply white granulated sugar with molasses added to it anyway.

The granulated sugars are largely interchangeable in granola and granola bar recipes, and the liquid sugars like molasses, honey and maple syrup are as well. Honey is much thicker than maple syrup, though, and therefore stickier and more useful in holding bars together. Molasses is best used in moderation as it has a very strong flavor.

The most important thing to realize about these sugars is that, to hold granola bars together, the sugars must be heated. In bars that are baked in the oven, that’s how they’re heated. For no bake bars, you must cook the sugars on the stovetop before they do their work in the bars.

Fats and Aromatics

If you've ever wondered how you make homemade granola bars, this master granola bar recipe is for you. Make them chewy, crunchy or even no bake!

Forgive the tortured category of fats and aromatics, which doesn’t quite do this category justice. But I didn’t want the list of categories to be too long, so I went for it.

Fat

To make granola and granola bars, you need some fat. Fat is an indispensable flavor delivery system. Plus, it’s responsible for helping the other ingredients to brown without burning when they’re baked. And when it becomes firm again in the refrigerator or at room temperature (for some fats), it helps hold the bars together.

Pictured in the photo on the left above, clockwise from the left, are sunflower oil (any neutral oil will do), virgin coconut oil (clearly the healthiest of the bunch) and unsalted butter. Any fat that’s solid or semi-solid at room temperature will need to be melted to use in granola bar creation.

Aromatics

When I refer to aromatics, I’m talking about salt (which brings out other flavors, including sweetness), vanilla extract, and warm spices like ground cinnamon, nutmeg, even cloves or allspice if you like. For the most part, these ingredients are added to taste.

Egg

Then there’s the humble egg. I like to use an egg in chewy granola bars as it really helps with texture and to hold the softer bars together.

The Bulk

If you've ever wondered how you make homemade granola bars, this master granola bar recipe is for you. Make them chewy, crunchy or even no bake!

These are the ingredients that take up space in your granola bars. They don’t generally have a ton of crunch, and they’re mostly just, well, one form of oats or another.

Oats

First of all, if you’re in the U.S. and you’re gluten free, and wondering if oats are gluten free, well, they are. Now, with that out of the way, it’s very hard to make granola of any kind without oats. You can make Paleo granola, which is loose and not formed into bars, without oats and it’s quite lovely. Bars are another story.

I don’t ever buy quick-cooking oats or oat flour. I just buy certified gluten free (since my family eats gluten free‚ÄĒif you’re not gluten free, buy any oats you like!) old fashioned rolled oats, and process them in a blender or food processor. I process them by about half (in quick bursts) for “quick-cooking oats,” and completely for oat flour.

In the photo above, you’ll find (from the top), old fashioned rolled oats, quick-cooking oats and oat flour. They all started out in my kitchen as old fashioned rolled oats. It makes everything easier, and I never need oat flour to be completely smooth. I expect anything with oats to have some chew.

You can try making granola bars completely without oats (the crunchy granola bar recipe seems like the best candidate). Maybe try replacing the oats with quinoa flakes, for example. But they aren’t very bulky, or very chewy. They tend to “melt” into whatever they are baked with. It’s worth a shot, though!

Puffed Rice Cereal

The final ingredient in this category of “bulk” is crisp rice cereal. I like to buy puffed rice that has two ingredients: rice and salt. If you’re gluten free like we are, I like Nature’s Path Organic brand and Erewhon puffed rice cereals.

You can actually buy salt-free puffed rice cereal and that works, too. But if you ever want to eat some in a bowl with maybe some fruit and milk, be sure to use the type that has a bit of salt.

If you’d like to replace the rice cereal with another crispy, dry cereal, hopefully, you have a better imagination than I do! I can’t think of another cereal that has the same size and pop (snap! crackle!).

Chewy Granola Bars

If you've ever wondered how you make homemade granola bars, this master granola bar recipe is for you. Make them chewy, crunchy or even no bake!

I’m not going to sugar-coat it. Chewy granola bars are made with tons of sugar. (See what I did there?)

The way to keep them soft and chewy? Lots of different kinds of sugars. They’re so incredibly delicious, and they taste much like the store-bought kind of granola bar.

Think of it like eating out at a restaurant. The food often tastes extra delicious for a few reasons. Not only did someone else make it for you(score!), but you’ll find tons more salt, fat and maybe sugar in the food than you generally use at home.

These granola bars are so, so good. But so, so bad. You can make them more virtuous by using unrefined granulated sugar like coconut palm sugar, and unrefined liquid sugars like honey and maple syrup. But sugar is sugar.

Crunchy Granola Bars

If you've ever wondered how you make homemade granola bars, this master granola bar recipe is for you. Make them chewy, crunchy or even no bake!

Crunchy granola bars are the easiest to make lower in sugar. Sugar is a tenderizer, and crunchy granola bars aren’t, well, tender. They’re crunchy! These are my personal favorite type of bar.

I love the combination of oats and puffed rice cereal (the cereal really helps them get and stay crunchy), and I love the relatively low sugar content. You can really taste the other ingredients. The nuts are finely ground, but you can make them yourself. You don’t need to buy already ground nut flours.

No Bake Granola Bars

If you've ever wondered how you make homemade granola bars, this master granola bar recipe is for you. Make them chewy, crunchy or even no bake!

My oldest calls these no bake granola bars the “ones that taste great but are bad for you.” And she’s right. We don’t have to use a candy thermomter and be all precise about it. But to make no-bake granola bars, we cook the sugars until they start to reach a “softball stage,” and then we mix them into the dry ingredients.

I don’t generally make these with any nuts at all, so they’re a great option for a nut-free school or camp. You can use nuts instead of some of the coconut flakes, if you like. These are very, very versatile. But don’t try to cut back on the sugar.

Another favorite variation on these is to add a bit of chopped chocolate ūüćꬆto the cooked sugars as they’re cooling. Mix until smooth and proceed with the recipe. If you’re going for it, go all the way!

If you've ever wondered how you make homemade granola bars, this master granola bar recipe is for you. Make them chewy, crunchy or even no bake!

We made it! We talked ingredients and theory, and I loved every minute. What can I say? I’m a wonk.

Anyway, knowledge is power. ‚ö°ÔłŹ¬†The more you understand why a recipe calls for one type of ingredient over another, the more you can customize the recipe to your particular tastes and dietary needs. This is the last granola bar recipe you’ll ever need, really. Enjoy!

If you've ever wondered how you make homemade granola bars, this master granola bar recipe is for you. Make them chewy, crunchy or even no bake!
Prep time: Cook time: Yield: 12 to 15 bars

Ingredients

Nuts (almonds, pecans, cashews‚ÄĒchopped or ground into flour)

Bulk (oats (rolled, quick, flour) + puffed rice cereal)

Sugars (light brown sugar, granulated sugar, molasses, coconut palm sugar, honey, pure maple syrup)

Mix-ins (coconut flakes, pumpkin seeds, hemp seeds, small dried fruit like raisins, chocolate chips)

Fat (virgin coconut oil (melted), neutral vegetable oil, butter (melted))

Kosher salt

Warm Spices (ground cinnamon, ground nutmeg)

Vanilla extract

Egg

Directions

  • For Crunchy Granola Bars, combine 1 cup finely ground nuts, 1/2 cup granulated sugar (coconut palm sugar, light brown sugar and/or white granulated sugar),¬†2 cups old fashioned rolled oats,¬†2 cups puffed rice cereal in a bowl and mix. Add 1/4 cup honey,¬†5 tablespoons oil, a bit of kosher salt and as much pure vanilla extract as you like. Press firmly into a lined quarter sheet pan and bake at 325¬įF for about 25 minutes. Allow to cool before slicing into bars. For full, detailed instructions, see this post for crunchy granola bars.

  • For Chewy Granola Bars, combine¬†1 3/4 cups quick oats,¬†1 cup oat flour, 3/4 cup granulated sugar¬†(coconut palm sugar, light brown sugar and/or white granulated sugar),¬†16 ounces nuts and/or other mix-ins in a bowl and mix. Add 8 tablespoons melted butter,
    1 egg,¬†a¬†bit of kosher salt and as much pure vanilla extract and ground cinnamon as you like. Press into a lined 8-inch or 9-inch square baking pan, and bake at 325¬įF for about 25 minutes. Allow to cool before slicing into bars. For full, detailed instructions, see this post for chewy granola bars.

  • For No Bake Granola Bars, combine¬†2 cups old fashioned rolled oats,¬†1/2 cup oat flour, 2 cups puffed rice cereal, 1/2 cup coconut chips or other mix-ins (including nuts, if you like) into a bowl and mix. In a small saucepan, place the 1 cup granulated sugar¬†(coconut palm sugar, light brown sugar and/or white granulated sugar),¬†1/2 cup honey and 1/4 cup oil (virgin coconut oil or neutral oil) and mix. Bring to a simmer over medium heat and continue to cook undisturbed for 45 seconds. Remove from the heat, add a¬†bit of kosher salt and as much pure vanilla extract as you like. Allow to cool until not burning hot to the touch, then pour into the bowl of dry ingredients. Mix to combine and press into an 8-inch or 9-inch square baking pan. Allow to cool completely before slicing into bars.¬†For full, detailed instructions, see this post for no bake granola bars.

Love,
Nicole

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