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Gluten Free Red Velvet Chocolate Chip Cookies

Gluten Free Red Velvet Chocolate Chip Cookies

These thick, soft and chewy gluten free red velvet chocolate chip cookies have just the right red velvet taste in a portable cookie form—with the ease of a drop cookie. Celebrate the season!

These thick, soft and chewy gluten free red velvet chocolate chip cookies have just the right red velvet taste in the perfect cookie form!

Red velvet lovers and haters

Red velvet is one of those things that tends to evoke lots of strong opinions. Even though it’s true that the original red velvet cakes were just slightly red-tinged because of the hint of cocoa powder (it’s not really a super chocolate cake), I like mine really red. Ruby red.

It doesn’t change the taste, of course (because that would be gross), but it does change my eating experience. If you don’t want/can’t have the food coloring? Leave it out. These gluten free red velvet chocolate chip cookies are based on my recipe for gluten free soft batch CCCs, but—I’m gonna say it—better

There’s something about the hint of cocoa, the red color, the slight tang from some apple cider vinegar and just the right amount of white chocolate chips that makes these cookies … just my thing.

And, of course, since they’re soft batch, they really do taste like they’re just right out of the oven. But without the ooey gooeyness. I like my cookies to stay together, and cookies that are actually right out of the oven? They don’t do that. 

These thick, soft and chewy gluten free red velvet chocolate chip cookies have just the right red velvet taste in the perfect cookie form!

Baking with food coloring

If you refuse to use food coloring in your kitchen under any circumstances, skip this section—and skip the food coloring in this recipe! It doesn’t affect the taste at all (when you do it right). Please, no campaigns in the comments to save the rest of us from the evils of food coloring. 😬

For the rest of us, let’s talk about which food coloring to use and when. I rarely use anything other than gel food coloring, which is a concentrated food coloring in gel form. Using gel food coloring means that you never have to add so much of the stuff that it changes the chemistry—and taste—of your baked goods. 

The most widely available brand of gel food coloring where I live is Wilton brand, but Wilton’s food corloings are not reliably gluten free. My favorite brand of gluten free food coloring is AmeriColor brand. It’s not cheap, but gel food coloring lasts a long, long time.

AmeriColor is sold in some kitchen supply stores and even fewer craft stores, so I buy it online. I like this Americolor kit best (that’s an affiliate link) for a few reasons.

First, that kit has great basic colors like blue, red, yellow and green. Second, the bottles are small, but they have a flip top that allows you to squeeze the coloring out in small amounts. If you purchase the colors that come in bottles with screw-on lids, you will get the color everywhere each time you use it. 

Please keep in mind that food coloring fades during baking. You want the color of your raw batter or dough to be brighter than the way you’d like your ultimate baked goods.

Try your best to mix the coloring into the wet ingredients before incorporating everything into the dry ingredients, and you won’t have streaks of color in the cookies. There’s no need to mix the wet ingredients separately, though, before mixing them into the dry. If you watch the video, you’ll see what I mean.

These thick, soft and chewy gluten free red velvet chocolate chip cookies have just the right red velvet taste in the perfect cookie form!

Team chewy, or team crispy chocolate chip cookies?

I love all cookies. I do not discriminate. But normally my love language is a super crispy cookie. Crispy cookies become crispy because of the balance of flour-sugar-eggs-vanilla ingredients in the recipe. But also because they’re allowed to brown at a low oven temperature and very slowly. 

But red velvet cookies aren’t going to be red if they are crispy, not without adding so much food coloring that you’re bound to taste it (and not in a good way). The intense browning would lead to a very faded red color otherwise. 

That’s why red velvet cookies are best made super thick like these soft batch-style cookies. They’re also lovely as red velvet crinkle cookies, which are a family favorite, too. 

If you normally don’t like soft and chewy cookies, or maybe you’re all about the crispy on the outside, chewy inside like our Mrs. Fields chocolate chip cookies, you really should still give these red velvet cookies a try. They’re like the chocolate cookie for vanilla lovers like my son—and they just look so impressive on a holiday table.

These thick, soft and chewy gluten free red velvet chocolate chip cookies have just the right red velvet taste in the perfect cookie form!

Ingredients and substitutions

Dairy-free: In place of the butter in this recipe, you can try using Earth Balance buttery sticks. They contain quite a bit more moisture than butter, though, so your cookies will likely spread more than mine. If you can’t find dairy-free white chocolate chips, just use dairy-free semi-sweet or dark chocolate chips. 

Egg-free: In place of the whole egg, you can try using a “chia egg” (1 tablespoon ground white chia seeds + 1 tablespoon lukewarm water, mixed and allowed to gel), but the egg yolk is a bit more difficult to replace. You can try adding one more tablespoon of unsalted butter in place of the egg yolk, as it’s there to tenderize the cookies.

Corn-free: This one’s easy! In place of cornstarch, you can use arrowroot. 

Vinegar: In place of apple cider vinegar you can use white wine or white balsamic vinegar. 

 

Gluten Free Red Velvet Soft Batch White Chocolate Chip Cookies

Gluten Free Red Velvet Soft Batch White Chocolate Chip Cookies

These thick, soft and chewy gluten free red velvet chocolate chip cookies have just the right red velvet taste in the perfect cookie form! #glutenfree #gf #redvelvet #Valentine #Christmas

Like this recipe?

Prep time: Cook time: Yield: About 20 cookies

Ingredients

2 cups (280 g) all purpose gluten free flour (I used Better Batter)

1 teaspoon xanthan gum (omit if your blend already contains it)

3 tablespoons (24 g) cornstarch

2 tablespoons (10 g) unsweetened cocoa powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

2/3 cup (133 g) granulated sugar

1/2 cup (109 g) packed light brown sugar

6 tablespoons (84 g) unsalted butter, at room temperature

5 tablespoons (60 g) nonhydrogenated vegetable shortening, melted and cooled

1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar

2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

1 egg (50 g, weighed out of shell) + 1 egg yolk at room temperature, beaten

Red gel food coloring

1 cup (6 ounces) white chocolate chips

Directions

  • Preheat your oven to 350°F. Line rimmed baking sheets with unbleached parchment paper, and set them aside.

  • In a large bowl, place the flour, xanthan gum, cornstarch, cocoa powder, baking soda, salt, and granulated sugar, and whisk to combine well. Add the brown sugar, and mix to combine, working to break up any lumps. Create a well in the center of the dry ingredients and add the butter, shortening, vinegar, vanilla, eggs, and about 1/8 teaspoon of the gel food coloring, and mix to combine. Work the gel food coloring into the wet ingredients in the center of the bowl to avoid streaks of red color in the cookies. The color should be a relatively deep red color, as it will fade during baking. Add more food coloring in very small amounts, if necessary, to reach the desired color. Add the chocolate chips and mix until evenly distributed throughout the dough. The dough will seem almost a bit crumbly when mixed with a spoon, but will hold together well when squeezed in your palm.

  • Scoop the dough into 20 equal pieces, each about 1 1/2 tablespoonsful, then roll each into a ball, then place on the prepared baking sheet about 1 1/2 inches apart. For the thickest cookies, place the baking sheet in the freezer for about 5 minutes to chill. Place the baking sheet in the center of the preheated oven and bake for 11 minutes, or until the cookies are just set in the center. Remove the cookies from the oven and allow to cool on the baking sheet for 10 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely. These cookies freeze amazingly well when sealed in a freezer-safe container. The cookie dough itself can also be shaped, frozen in a single layer on a baking sheet and then stored in a zip-top bag in the freezer. Defrost to cool room temperature before baking.

  • Originally published in 2014. Most photos, video and most text are new. The recipe itself is unchanged except for some minor clarifications.

Love,
Nicole

Fancy Gluten Free Drop Sugar Cookies

Fancy Gluten Free Drop Sugar Cookies

These gluten free drop sugar cookies are simple, sweet and buttery, plus they’re stable enough for mailing clear across the country if that’s your holiday thing! Dress them up in lots of different ways.

These gluten free drop sugar cookies are simple, sweet and buttery, plus they're stable enough for mailing clear across the country if that's your holiday thing! Dress them up in lots of different ways.

Start with a drop cookie

When someone is new to baking, or new to gluten free baking, or just plain new, they often ask me where they should begin. My answer is always the same: drop cookies.

Drop cookies are so-named because there’s nothing to roll out (unlike soft frosted sugar cookies), nothing to chance. Like chocolate chip cookies, you simply drop the dough on the baking sheet and let the oven do its job. 

These gluten free drop sugar cookies are your basic soft-inside vanilla cookies. They’re the kind that you would love to send to your friends and family 📦for the holidays because they’re simple enough to survive a trip by mail and special enough to show how much you care.

These gluten free drop sugar cookies are simple, sweet and buttery, plus they're stable enough for mailing clear across the country if that's your holiday thing! Dress them up in lots of different ways.

Make sure your decorations are GF

This cookie recipe isn’t naturally gluten free, so if you’re reading this post, you’re baking gluten free—even if it’s just this once. You’re using an all purpose gluten free flour blend, and a good GF blend doesn’t just happen to be in everyone’s pantry. 

So if you’re making these cookies, you want to get them right. That means using gluten free decorations. Of course, you can bake these cookies without any decorations at all, but they’re so much more fun dressed up. 

If you get distracted during baking and set the dough aside for a bit before you shape and/or decorate it, you may find that the decorations tend not to stick properly to the cookie dough. Simply wet the outside of the cookies generously with a finger bowl of lukewarm water.

Wetting the dough won’t change the way the cookies bake at all, and the decorations will stick beautifully. Now to make sure those decorations are all safely gluten free…

These gluten free drop sugar cookies are simple, sweet and buttery, plus they're stable enough for mailing clear across the country if that's your holiday thing! Dress them up in lots of different ways.

Gluten free sprinkles, nonpareils, and edible confetti

Signature Brands makes both Cake Mate and Betty Crocker brand sprinkles and nonpareils, and at least in the U.S. as of this writing, those products are gluten free. I can usually find their products in my regular grocery store.

If you can’t find them in a grocery store, you can certainly find them online. I really like ordering baking supplies like those from the online site GlobalSugarArt.com.

Global Sugar Art carries CK Brand sprinkles and nonpareils, and those tend to be gluten free. Always check the product label and manufacturer’s website for current information, though. 

For rainbow confetti, which I find impossibly adorable, I love Americolor brand since it’s reliably gluten free. It can be difficult to find, though. Sometimes I can find it on Amazon, sometimes not. When I do find it, I buy a few tubs of the stuff. 

These gluten free drop sugar cookies are simple, sweet and buttery, plus they're stable enough for mailing clear across the country if that's your holiday thing! Dress them up in lots of different ways.

Gluten free coarse sugar

I have had some serious difficulty finding coarse sugar crystals that are true white in color and reliably gluten free. It seems like such a simple thing, but it’s been difficult to find.

For years, I used Sugar in the Raw brand, which is readily available and tastes great. But the crystals aren’t white. They have a natural yellowish-brown color. Natural is great—but sometimes you just want artificially pretty! Extra festivity points if you use some white, some brightly colored coarse sugar, too!

The brand I’ve found online that I love is Chef’s Select Granulated Sugar Crystals (that’s an affiliate link, but shop around!). Chef’s Select also makes a similar container of gluten free rainbow sprinkles (or jimmies, if you’re from Philly 😬). 

These gluten free drop sugar cookies are simple, sweet and buttery, plus they're stable enough for mailing clear across the country if that's your holiday thing! Dress them up in lots of different ways.

Ingredients and substitutions

Dairy-free: To replace the butter in this recipe, I’d try Melt brand or Miyoko’s Kitchen brand vegan butter alternative. If you use virgin coconut oil, the cookie dough will be too soft and the cookies won’t hold their shape properly.

Egg-free: Since there is only one egg in this recipe, I’d recommend trying one “chia egg” (1 tablespoon ground white chia seeds + 1 tablespoon lukewarm water, mixed and allowed to gel) to make the recipe egg-free. 

Corn-free: At first glance, this recipe doesn’t have any corn, but confectioners’ sugar is typically made with cornstarch to keep it from clumping. Look for a corn-free confectioners’ sugar if you can’t have corn.

Shortening: You need a mix of butter and shortening (Spectrum nonhydrogenated vegetable shortening is not the unhealthy mess that Crisco is) to get the texture and shape of these cookies just right. If you use all butter, the cookies will spread way too much.

 

Gluten Free Drop Sugar CookiesGluten Free Drop Sugar Cookies

These gluten free drop sugar cookies are simple, sweet and buttery, plus they're stable enough for mailing clear across the country if that's your holiday thing! Dress them up in lots of different ways. #glutenfree #gf #cookies #Christmas

Like this recipe?

Prep time: Cook time: Yield: About 18 cookies, depending upon size

Ingredients

1 3/4 cups (245 g) all-purpose gluten free flour (I used Better Batter)

3/4 teaspoon xanthan gum (omit if your blend already contains it)

1 teaspoon baking powder

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1/2 cup (58 g) confectioners’ sugar

1/2 cup (100 g) granulated sugar

5 tablespoons (70 g) unsalted butter, at room temperature

5 tablespoons (60 g) nonhydrogenated vegetable shortening (Spectrum brand), melted and cooled

1 egg (50 g, weighed out of shell) at room temperature, beaten

2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract

Coarse sugar, nonpareils or sprinkles, for coating (optional)

Directions

  • Preheat your oven to 350°F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with unbleached parchment paper and set it aside.

  • In a large bowl, place the flour blend, xanthan gum, baking powder, salt, confectioners’ sugar and granulated sugar, and whisk to combine well. Add the butter, shortening, egg, and vanilla, and mix well to combine. The dough will seem crumbly until it comes together. It will be soft but should hold together well when squeezed. Scoop the dough by about the heaping tablespoonful, roll each piece into a ball and press into a disk about 1/4 inch thick. The cookie dough should seem tacky to the touch on all sides. If it appears to have dried out at all, moisten the outside of each piece with lukewarm water. Press each disk carefully but firmly into coarse sugar, nonpareils or sprinkles until the decoration adheres to the dough all around. Place the disks of dough on the prepared baking sheet, about 1 inch apart from one another.

  • Place in the center of the preheated oven and bake for 10 minutes, or until the cookies are very lightly golden brown on the edges and set in the center. Remove the baking sheet from the oven and allow the cookies to cool on the baking sheet for 5 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.

  • Originally posted on the blog in 2013. Photos and video new; recipe unchanged except for some clarification in instructions.

Love,
Nicole

How To Make Rice Pudding | Stovetop or IP

How To Make Rice Pudding | Stovetop or IP

Learn how to make rice pudding with any kind of rice, whether it’s cooked or raw, and with any kind of milk. All it takes is a few basic ingredients to serve it warm or cold.

Learn how to make rice pudding with any kind of rice, whether it's cooked or raw, and with any kind of milk. All it takes is a few basic ingredients to serve it warm or cold.

A truly simple pleasure

The first time I ever had rice pudding was when I was in college. I spent a semester in Spain and the señora in the family I lived with made us rice pudding nearly every night. 

This amazing woman often spent all day cooking, and made the rice pudding fresh in the morning and allowed it to chill all day long. She cared for us with tons of love and kindness—until we moved because we were young and stupid and thought we could do better. 😶And I’ve been chasing something like her recipe (and running away from my shame at that youthful indiscretion) ever since.

If you didn’t grow up eating rice pudding, it might sound a bit … strange. But if it’s made right, whether it’s chilled or warm, firm or soft, it’s always delicious. Unless you hate, well, pudding of all kinds (and maybe puppies 🐶and rainbows 🌈 too?), you must love rice pudding.

It’s easy to forget how elegant something as simple as this can be. There’s no flour and no cornstarch in any of these versions. And if you make it on the stovetop from raw rice, you don’t even need an egg.

In fact, you need little more than rice, milk, and some sweetener to make a thick and creamy pudding that’s naturally gluten free.

Learn how to make rice pudding with any kind of rice, whether it's cooked or raw, and with any kind of milk. All it takes is a few basic ingredients to serve it warm or cold.

Stovetop or Instant Pot/Raw or Cooked Rice

My first recipe for rice pudding and the one I made for years without regret was made on the stovetop with freshly-made short grain (usually arborio, or risotto rice) rice that I parlayed immediately into a creamy pudding.

That version is in my first cookbook (and its second edition) and it works beautifully. But it does take a bit of time (and a couple of pots).

Recently, I started to wonder how to make rice pudding with cooked rice, and if that would make the recipe a bit more forgiving. It turns out that, not only can you make rice pudding with cooked rice, you can use any type of rice you like—plus any milk at all.

Then, I use my Instant Pot many times a week anyway, and I have a dogeared copy of Melissa Clark’s Dinner In An Instant (that’s an affiliate link) and make rice in the IP all the time. So naturally, I wondered if I could slide right into a raw-rice IP version of rice pudding. Spoiler: I could. I did!

Learn how to make rice pudding with any kind of rice, whether it's cooked or raw, and with any kind of milk. All it takes is a few basic ingredients to serve it warm or cold.

On the stovetop with cooked rice

Once you learn how to make rice pudding on the stovetop with cooked rice, you might be tempted never to make it any other way again. I’ve made it successfully with any sort of sticky, cooked rice, from arborio rice to sushi rice to long grain white rice.

If you’re making rice for a meal, do yourself a favor and make a bit extra and set it aside to make into rice pudding. If you’ve got that in the back of your mind, go ahead and make the rice with a bit less water than usual so that it comes out nice and sticky. 

Another trick for getting cooked rice to turn sticky, even if it’s not shorter grain, naturally high starch rice is to undercook it on the stovetop by a few minutes. In other words, stop cooking before every last bit of water is absorbed by the rice.

Then, turn off the heat and allow the pot to sit, covered, on the burner for until it cools. You’ll be rewarded with sticky rice, even if it’s long grain.

Learn how to make rice pudding with any kind of rice, whether it's cooked or raw, and with any kind of milk. All it takes is a few basic ingredients to serve it warm or cold.

In the Instant Pot with raw rice

Originally, the video for this recipe was of the stovetop method with cooked rice, since it’s the most forgiving version. But when I misplaced the raw video footage, after the (mild) swearing, I decided it would be more informative to shoot a video of the Instant Pot version.

My Instant Pot is the 6-quart version, but I think that this modest amount of rice pudding can be made in a smaller Instant Pot without incident. Don’t be tempted to double the recipe, though, and cook it all at once in your pressure cooker. 

Cooking milk in a pressure cooker requires a ton of breathing room. If you double the recipe, or even make 1 1/2 times the amount, your pot will most likely boil over. Trust me when I say that you do not want to deal with a milk overboil situation—especially with your pressure cooker.

Learn how to make rice pudding with any kind of rice, whether it's cooked or raw, and with any kind of milk. All it takes is a few basic ingredients to serve it warm or cold.

On the stovetop with raw rice

In the stovetop version with raw rice, my original version, I steep some whole cinnamon and whole nutmeg in the milk to add some depth to the pudding. But of course those steps are optional. You can do the same with the Instant Pot version, in fact.

All you need to remember about the stovetop version with raw rice is not to overcook it. Simmer it in water just until it has absorbed most of the liquid before pouring in the simmering milk.

If you’d like an even quicker and easier version of rice pudding (one that’s dairy-free, too) that requires almost no tending, kindly turn to page 179 of Gluten-Free on a Shoestring Quick and Easy. That one even has a thin and lightly sweet crust on top that just … sends me.

Ingredients and substitutions

Luckily, as long as you can eat rice itself, you can find a way to make rice pudding that suits your other dietary needs. Here is the information I can offer:

Dairy-free: This one is super easy. If you can’t have dairy, just replace the cow’s milk in each version with your favorite nondairy milk—as long as it’s not fat-free. My favorite nondairy milk is unsweetened almond milk. If you use a sweetened dairy milk, you might want to use less granulated sugar in the recipe, but that is to taste.

I don’t recommend using coconut milk in a can, as it’s too thick, as a replacement for the milk. However, you can use canned coconut milk as a replacement for the heavy cream in the Instant Pot version.

Egg-free: The raw-rice stovetop version is egg-free, so I’d recommend making that version if you can’t have eggs. It’s all ready for you.

Instead, if you’d like to try making the other versions without the egg, you can try replacing the egg with a cornstarch slurry in place of the egg and milk mixture. Just place the remaining half-cup (for the stovetop, cooked rice version) or 3 tablespoons (for the Instant Pot version) of milk in a small bowl and whisk in 2 tablespoons of cornstarch until it forms a thick, integrated liquid. Then add it to the main mixture and whisk until the pudding thickens.

Rice: If you want truly creamy rice pudding, unless you’re making it with cooked rice on the stovetop according to the directions below, you need to use a short grain rice. I like sushi and arborio rice equally well in this regard. 

If you’re making rice pudding on the stovetop with cooked rice, you can easily swap in sticky short grain brown rice as well. I don’t recommend using brown rice otherwise.

 

Learn how to make rice pudding with any kind of rice, whether it's cooked or raw, and with any kind of milk. All it takes is a few basic ingredients to serve it warm or cold. #glutenfree #gf #glutenfree #instantpotGluten Free Rice Pudding

Like this recipe?

Prep time: Cook time: Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients

In the electric pressure cooker
1/2 cup (90 g) short grain white rice, rinsed and drained

2 cups (16 fluid ounces) + 3 tablespoons (1 1/2 fluid ounces) milk

1/2 cup (4 fluid ounces) heavy whipping cream

1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons (75 g) granulated sugar

1/8 teaspoon kosher salt

1 egg (50 g, weighed out of shell) at room temperature

On the stovetop with cooked rice
1 1/2 cups (300 g) cooked white rice

2 cups (16 fluid ounces) milk, at room temperature

1/3 cup (67 g) granulated sugar

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1 egg (50 g, weighed out of shell) at room temperature

On the stovetop with raw rice
2 cups (16 ounces) lukewarm water

1 cup (180 g) short grain rice (like arborio or sushi rice), rinsed and drained

1/8 teaspoon kosher salt

4 cups (32 fl. oz.) milk (any kind, as long as it’s not nonfat)

1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons (75 g) granulated sugar

1 stick whole cinnamon (optional)

1 piece whole nutmeg (optional)

For all recipes (optional)
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

Ground cinnamon for sprinkling

Directions

  • For the pressure cooker with raw rice:

    In the bowl of your instant pot, place the rice, 2 cups of the milk, plus the cream, sugar, and salt, and stir to combine. Secure the lid of your instant pot, set the vent to seal, press “manual” and set the time to 6 minutes. The pot will switch on and come to pressure, then begin counting down the 6 minutes. Once the timer has sounded to signal the end of the cooking period, turn off the pot and allow the pressure to release naturally by allowing the pot to sit, undisturbed, for about 20 minutes. Release any remaining pressure manually by turning the venting dial to “vent.”

    Open the lid of the pot, and turn the instant pot back on to sauté by pressing the “Sauté” button. Once the mixture begins to simmer, in a small bowl, whisk the remaining 3 tablespoons of milk and the egg. Beginning with a very small amount of the simmering rice pudding, temper the egg (slowly raise its temperature so the egg doesn’t scramble) by adding some of the simmering rice pudding to the egg mixture and whisking to combine. Transfer the egg mixture to the instant pot bowl, and allow to simmer, stirring constantly, until it thickens enough that a spatula along the bottom of the instant pot leaves a visible trail that the mixture takes a moment to fill.

  • For the stovetop with cooked rice: In a medium saucepan, place the cooked rice, 1 1/2 cups (12 fluid ounces) milk, sugar, and salt over medium heat. Cook, stirring frequently until the mixture comes to a simmer and begins to thicken (about 8 minutes). Place the remaining 1/2 cup milk and the egg in a separate bowl, and whisk to combine well. Add about 1 cup of the hot milk and rice mixture to milk and egg mixture, a bit at a time, whisking to combine. Transfer the egg mixture to the saucepan and continue to cook until the pudding has begun to thicken, about 2 to 3 minutes more. Remove the saucepan from the heat, stir in the optional vanilla extract, and mix to combine.

  • For the stovetop with raw rice: In a large saucepan, place the water, rice, and salt, stir to combine and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook stirring frequently for about 10 to 15 minutes, or until the rice has absorbed most of the water, leaving behind no more than a bit of thick, starchy water. Be careful not to overcook the rice.

    While the rice is cooking, in a separate, medium-size saucepan, combine the milk, sugar, optional whole cinnamon and nutmeg, and cook over medium heat until simmering (about 2 minutes). Once the rice in the separate saucepan is cooked, pour the simmering milk mixture through a strainer into the larger saucepan. Discard the whole cinnamon and nutmeg.

    Cook the rice and milk mixture over medium-low heat, stirring frequently until the rice has absorbed most of the milk mixture and the entire mixture has thickened and begins to appear pudding-like, about 15 minutes more. It will thicken as it cools. Add the optional vanilla, and mix to combine.

  • For all versions, add the optional vanilla and mix to combine. Transfer the prepared rice pudding to serving dishes and serve warm with ground cinnamon to taste. Alternatively, for a firmer pudding, place plastic wrap directly on the surface and allow to cool at room temperature until no longer hot to the touch. Cover tightly and refrigerate for at least an hour before serving chilled with ground cinnamon to taste.

  • Originally published on the blog in 2013. Variations added, most photos and video all new. Most text new. Stovetop version with raw rice minimally adapted from Gluten-Free on a Shoestring: 125 Recipes For Eating Well on the Cheap (Hachette/Perseus 2017).

Love,
Nicole

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