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Soft Paleo Flour Tortillas

Soft Paleo Flour Tortillas

These soft Paleo flour tortillas are soft, bendable and have a savory buttery taste that goes with everything. They even reheat perfectly after being refrigerated or frozen!

These soft Paleo flour tortillas are soft, bendable and have a savory buttery taste that goes with everything. They even reheat perfectly after being refrigerated or frozen!

Wraps make everything better

These Paleo tortillas have just the right balance of almond flour and tapioca starch that they’re really flexible but have the savory, buttery taste of almond flour. Flour tortillas have long been not just a favorite of mine to eat, especially since they’re so versatile. When I finally developed a recipe for gluten free flour tortillas that I loved, it was really a relief, to be honest.

I just adore soft tacos, enchiladas, and just wraps and flatbread in general. If I know that I have some sort of fresh flatbread ready to serve for dinner, I’m more than halfway to a great meal. My kids will eat almost anything that’s been wrapped in a tortilla!

These days, you can purchase so many different kinds of packaged gluten free flour tortillas and gluten free corn tortillas. I’ve even reviewed enough to be able to recommend 8 great brands of each.

But fresh is always going to be better than packaged, gluten free or not. Plus, there’s really only one brand of Paleo tortillas that are any good (spoiler: it’s Siete brand), and they’re quite expensive and overall not very easy to find.

These soft Paleo flour tortillas are soft, bendable and have a savory buttery taste that goes with everything. They even reheat perfectly after being refrigerated or frozen!

Why add xanthan gum?

When I first published this recipe on the blog in 2015, the recipe instructions made all kinds of disclaimers about how delicate the dough was to handle. As time went on, whenever I made the recipe myself as it was originally written, I started to play with it a bit to improve the raw texture.

The most important change this time around is the addition of xanthan gum, which really helps hold the dough together. 

These soft Paleo flour tortillas are soft, bendable and have a savory buttery taste that goes with everything. They even reheat perfectly after being refrigerated or frozen!

How to make these Paleo flour tortillas

The dough for this recipe is made entirely in one bowl, with a whisk and then a spoon. That’s all you really need. First, the dry ingredients (almond flour, tapioca flour, salt, baking powder, xanthan gum) get whisked together. Then, the wet ingredients (melted virgin coconut oil, egg white, and water) are added and a somewhat soft but thick dough comes together.

I’ve found that the dough is much easier to handle if you refrigerate it for at least 30 minutes and up to 3 days before working with it. I tend to make the dough for these tortillas on the weekend, wrap it tightly and then roll and cook it during the week since it’s so easy to work with that way. The xanthan gum in the dough makes it more resilient, and chilling the dough makes it more of a pleasure. 

For the very best pliable tortillas, the secret is to make sure that the skillet is very hot before you place the first raw tortilla on it. It should begin to bubble within the first 10 seconds of being on the skillet. At worst, the first tortilla will be less than perfect. 

Just don’t expect to roll them quite as thin as conventional tortillas. In fact, if you do roll them thinner than 1/4-inch, they tend to cook too quickly on the skillet and aren’t quite as flexible. 

These soft Paleo flour tortillas are soft, bendable and have a savory buttery taste that goes with everything. They even reheat perfectly after being refrigerated or frozen!

Can you make them in advance?

In a word, yes! You can definitely make these Paleo tortillas in advance. They’re even more versatile than most other wraps, in fact, since they are just as good when they’re made in advance and refrigerated or frozen. The raw dough itself even benefits from being made a day or two in advance and stored in the refrigerator. 

If you don’t plan to serve the tortillas immediately after they come off the skillet, I recommend stacking them and wrapping the stack tightly in something like Glad Press ‘n’ Seal or beeswax. If you think you’ll serve them within 3 days, store them in the refrigerator and microwave them for about 20 seconds right before serving.

If you’d like to freeze the tortillas (make a double batch and freeze half!), just defrost them either in the refrigerator overnight or at room temperature. Then refresh them in the microwave. You can of course refresh them in a hot, dry skillet, but I find that they’re more flexible after a few moments in the microwave.

These soft Paleo flour tortillas are soft, bendable and have a savory buttery taste that goes with everything. They even reheat perfectly after being refrigerated or frozen!

Ingredients and substitutions

Since these tortillas are Paleo, they’re already gluten free and dairy free, by definition. Here are a few words about some of the ingredients, in case you have additional dietary restrictions. I haven’t tested them with any substitutions, but these are my best-educated guesses, as always.

Egg-free: The egg white in this recipe helps to add structure to the tortillas, so if you can’t have eggs, I don’t recommend just eliminating the ingredient.  You can try replacing it with a “chia egg” (1 tablespoon ground white chia seeds + 1 tablespoon lukewarm water, mixed and allowed to gel), but since it’s only an egg white (and not a full egg), I’m honestly not sure how well that would work.

I don’t recommend using aquafaba as a substitute for the egg white since some readers have reported that that hasn’t been successful when the egg whites in the recipe aren’t first aerated by whipping. 

Almond flour: You cannot use almond meal in place of finely ground blanched almond flour, which is much more coarsely ground skins removed (a process called blanching). I recommend using Honeyville brand or Nuts.com brand for really good almond flour that I know will work in this recipe and my other Paleo recipes.

If you can’t have nuts, you can try using finely ground sunflower seed flour in place of almond flour. It will react with the baking powder and produce a greenish hue, but it won’t affect the taste. 

Baking powder: Most baking powder is not grain free, as it’s often made with cornstarch. However, you can either buy a grain-free baking powder, which is available. Alternatively, you can make your own Paleo baking powder.

To make your own grain-free baking powder, mix of 1 part baking soda + 1 part tapioca starch + 2 parts cream of tartar. For example, if you’re making 1 teaspoon of baking powder, combine 1/4 teaspoon baking soda + 1/4 teaspoon tapioca starch + 1/2 teaspoon cream of tartar. 

Tapioca starch/flour: I only recommend buying tapioca starch/flour from Nuts.com or Authentic Foods. Bob’s Red Mill tapioca starch is of inconsistent quality. Do not buy tapioca starch/flour from the Asian food store as it is frequently contaminated.

I’m afraid there is absolutely no appropriate substitute for tapioca starch/flour. It is very unique in its ability to provide stretch and pull. If you’d like to make almond flour tortillas without tapioca starch, try my recipe for low carb almond flour tortillas

 

Soft Paleo Flour TortillasSoft Paleo Flour TortillasSoft Paleo Flour TortillasSoft Paleo Flour TortillasThese soft Paleo flour tortillas are soft, bendable and have a savory buttery taste that goes with everything. They even reheat perfectly after being refrigerated or frozen! #paleo #glutenfree #gf #tortillas #wraps

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Prep time: Cook time: Yield: 8 to 10 6-inch tortillas

Ingredients

1 1/4 cups (140 g) finely ground blanched almond flour

1 1/2 cups (180 g) tapioca starch/flour, plus more for sprinkling

1 teaspoon kosher salt

1 teaspoon grain-free baking powder

1 teaspoon xanthan gum (optional, but highly recommended)

2 tablespoons (24 g) virgin coconut oil, melted and cooled

1 egg white (25 g), at room temperature

3/8 to 1/2 cup (3 to 4 fluid ounces) warm water

Directions

  • In a large bowl, place the almond flour, tapioca starch/flour, salt and baking powder, and (optional) xanthan gum, and whisk to combine well. Create a well in the center of the dry ingredients, add the coconut oil, egg white, and about 3 fluid ounces warm water, and mix to combine well. The dough should come together and be thick but relatively soft. Add more water by the teaspoonful if necessary to bring the dough together. Press the dough into a disk, divide it into two portions, wrap each tightly in plastic wrap and chill in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes, and up to 3 days.

  • Once the dough is chilled, heat a cast iron skillet or tortilla pan over medium heat until quite hot. Working with one half of the dough at a time, knead the dough in between your palms a bit. Lightly sprinkle a flat surface with tapioca flour, place the dough on top and sprinkle it lightly with more tapioca flour. Moving the dough frequently and sprinkling with more flour as necessary to prevent it from sticking, use a rolling pin to roll the dough until it’s about 10 inches wide. The dough will be thicker than the final tortillas will be. Using a 6-inch cake cutter or the lid of a pot about the same size, cut out a proper 6-inch round. Remove the scraps of dough and set them aside. Sprinkle the round with more flour and roll it out again, moving it frequently to avoid its sticking, until it’s about 1/4-inch thick (no thinner). Cut out a 6-inch round again. Place the raw tortilla in the hot skillet and it to cook until bubbles form on the underside (about 45 seconds). Using a wide, flat spatula, flip the tortilla over and continue to cook on the other side until just set (about 20 seconds more). Remove the tortilla from the skillet and place it in a tea towel to keep warm. Gather the remaining dough and repeat the process at least 3 other times with this half of the dough. You won’t likely have to cut a round and then reroll the dough thinner after the first tortilla. Repeat with the second half of the dough.

  • If you’re not planning to serve the tortillas right away, wrap them tightly and refrigerate for up to 3 days and freeze for longer storage. To refresh before serving, microwave the tortillas at full power for about 20 seconds before serving. They’ll be good as new. If you freeze the tortillas, defrost at room temperature and then refresh as you would if they had been refrigerated.

  • Originally published on the blog in 2015. Recipe changed a bit (optional xanthan gum added, egg whites reduced, swapped grain-free baking powder for baking soda), photos, video, and text mostly new.

Love,
Nicole

Naturally Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Cookies

Naturally Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Cookies

These naturally gluten free chocolate chip cookies are made entirely with “regular” grocery store ingredients—and no rice flour at all. Perfect if you’re new to gluten free baking!

These naturally gluten free chocolate chip cookies are made entirely with "regular" grocery store ingredients—and no rice flour at all. Perfect if you're new to gluten free baking!

The power of (naturally) gluten free baking

Where we began

When I first started cooking and baking gluten free, it was 2004. There was very little information available, and even fewer products to buy.

I bought and studied all of the Bette Hagman cookbooks, and I will forever be grateful for her pioneering work. Most baking I did during that time would not pass the “just plain good, not good for gluten free” taste test, but I was overjoyed to be able to take some control of feeding my newly gluten free son at least a variety of food—including cupcakes

Thankfully, we’ve come a long way since then.  The gluten free baking that we do these days is much, much better and my standards are as high as can be. “Good, for gluten free” is just pitiful to me now. In fact, I hear it as a rallying cry!

These naturally gluten free chocolate chip cookies are made entirely with "regular" grocery store ingredients—and no rice flour at all. Perfect if you're new to gluten free baking!

Where we are now

These days, you can bake literally anything at all gluten free that can be made with gluten, and it can be as good as if not better than what you remember. That’s a promise I make to you every day, in everything I do. 

But that sort of gluten free baking almost always requires a really high-quality all purpose gluten free flour blend that is based on superfine white rice flour. Since most of the gluten free flour blends that are on grocery store shelves aren’t properly balanced, you end up having to order component flours or a blend that I recommend online before you can get started.

I remember the feeling of dying to get started baking something, and not wanting to wait for ingredients to arrive by mail. 📦That was my motivation for developing the 20 or so flourless baking recipes here on the blog. 

These naturally gluten free chocolate chip cookies are made entirely with "regular" grocery store ingredients—and no rice flour at all. Perfect if you're new to gluten free baking!

How to make these naturally gluten free cookies

Whether you’re new to gluten free baking, new to baking at all, or you just want a cookie and ran out of your GF flour blend, a drop cookie (where you just make the dough and bake it in rounded portions on a baking sheet) is the perfect baking project.

These cookies aren’t technically made “flourless” since they have cornstarch in them to lighten them a bit and help them crisp. Plus, we take certified gluten free old fashioned rolled oats and grind them into flour. You can, of course, buy gluten free oat flour that’s already ground, but you’d likely have to order that by mail—something I never do.

These days, Bob’s Red Mill certified gluten free old fashioned rolled oats are in almost every full-sized grocery store. It’s cheaper to buy less processed oats and just grind them, plus we’re making cookies that we want to be chewy so we don’t need the finest grind. 

Like almost any chocolate chip cookie recipe, we place the dry ingredients in a large bowl and whisk them to combine. Then, we add the wet ingredients (butter, eggs, flavoring/extract) and mix. The chips go in last. 

Since we are using a lot of oat flour and a fair amount of cornstarch, it’s really important to use a full tablespoon of flavoring/extracts for flavor. I’ve made these cookies with just vanilla extract, but I really love them the best with 2 teaspoons of vanilla extract and 1 teaspoon of butter flavoring. 

Be sure to chill the dough, and be careful not to overbake them. If you’ve been around for a bit, you’ll recognize this style cookie from another recent recipe for peanut butter oatmeal cookies. The same rules of baking those cookies apply to these.

Those cookies are also naturally gluten free, but with the strong (and delightful) flavor of peanut butter. These cookies are more like “regular” chocolate chip cookies—just naturally gluten free. They’re crispy outside and chewy inside. Let’s get baking!

These naturally gluten free chocolate chip cookies are made entirely with "regular" grocery store ingredients—and no rice flour at all. Perfect if you're new to gluten free baking!

Ingredients and substitutions

Dairy-free: In place of the butter, you can try using half (48 g) Earth Balance buttery sticks and half (48 g) Spectrum brand nonhydrogenated vegetable shortening. That combination of fats should create the right moisture balance. Be sure you’re using dairy-free chocolate chips. 

Egg-free: You can try replacing each of the two eggs with a “chia egg” (1 tablespoon ground chia seeds + 1 tablespoon lukewarm water, mixed and allowed to gel), but the eggs really help to provide structure in this recipe so I’m not sure how egg replacements would work.

Corn-free: The cornstarch in this recipe can easily be replaced with arrowroot if you can’t have corn. Potato starch (not potato flour) should also work just fine. 

Oats: Certified gluten free oats are safe on a gluten free diet. But if you’re avoiding oats, you should be able to use quinoa flakes in place of the oat flour. Please see my full discussion of how to replace oats in baking

 

These naturally gluten free chocolate chip cookies are made entirely with "regular" grocery store ingredients—and no rice flour at all. Perfect if you're new to gluten free baking! #glutenfree #naturallygf #gf #cookies

 

Like this recipe?

Prep time: Cook time: Yield: 3 1/2 dozen cookies

Ingredients

1 3/4 cups (210 g) certified gluten free oat flour

1 cup (140 g) cornstarch

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1/2 cup (100 g) granulated sugar

1/2 cup (109 g) packed light brown sugar

7 tablespoons (96 g) unsalted butter, melted and cooled

2 eggs (100 g, weighed out of shell) at room temperature, beaten

1 tablespoon pure vanilla extract

6 ounces semi-sweet chocolate chips

Directions

  • Preheat your oven to 375°F. Line rimmed baking sheets with unbleached parchment paper and set them aside.

  • In a large bowl, place the oat flour, cornstarch, baking soda, salt, and granulated sugar, and whisk to combine well. Add the brown sugar and mix to combine, working out any lumps. Create a well in the center of the dry ingredients and add the butter, eggs, and vanilla, and mix to combine. The dough will be very thick, but just keep mixing and it will come together. It helps to press the dough down with the underside of the spoon sometimes while mixing. Add the chocolate chips and mix until they’re evenly distributed throughout the cookie dough.

  • Divide the dough into pieces of about 1 1/2 tablespoons each, roll each tightly into a ball and then place about 1 1/2-inches apart on the prepared baking sheets. Do not flatten the balls of dough at all. Chill the dough in the freezer for about 10 minutes or the refrigerator for about 30 minutes, until firm.

  • Place the baking sheets, one at a time, in the center of the preheated oven and bake just until the balls of dough have melted and spread and the cookies are brown around the edges, 10 to 12 minutes. Be careful not to overbake them. Remove from the oven and allow to cool for at least 10 minutes on the baking sheet or until firm.

Love,
Nicole

Gluten Free Carrot Pineapple Cake | Entenmann’s Style

Gluten Free Carrot Pineapple Cake | Entenmann’s Style

This gluten free carrot pineapple cake just tastes like the best classic carrot cake you’ve ever had. The crushed pineapple in the batter brings it all the way to amazing. ✨

A classic gluten free carrot cake made in the Entenmann's style, with crushed pineapple in the batter. Remember the taste? Have it again!

It doesn’t taste like pineapple 🥕🍍

I’ve always loved every detail of Entenmann’s boxed cakes, all the way down to how everyone serves them right in the box. After publishing my 4th cookbook, Gluten Free Classic Snacks, I was still hooked on recreating old gluteny favorites and it was right around Easter, so I went for the Entenmann’s iced carrot cake.

I started the way I always do when making a copycat recipe: the ingredient list on the box (that was me, loitering in the snacks aisle of the grocery store for an hour, snapping photos and taking notes!). Everything looked pretty much like you’d expect for a carrot cake—but then I noticed something interesting: pineapple. 

A classic gluten free carrot cake made in the Entenmann's style, with crushed pineapple in the batter. Remember the taste? Have it again!

I really love pineapple cakes, but I wasn’t entirely sold on the idea of adding pineapple to a carrot cake. I was afraid that it would compete with the shredded carrots and cinnamon and just lead to taste bud confusion. But I had never even noticed the pineapple in the boxed cake, so it was worth a try.

In place of milk or water, I used canned crushed pineapple in its own juices. It really helps to bring out the natural sweetness of the shredded carrots in the cake and helps everything retain its moisture. Those Entenmann’s people are so smart.

A classic gluten free carrot cake made in the Entenmann's style, with crushed pineapple in the batter. Remember the taste? Have it again!

All about the dreamy cream cheese icing

Entenmann’s ingredient list includes corn syrup. First of all, that’s not at all the same as high fructose corn syrup! Personally, I find light corn syrup to be super useful in candy making and occasionally in baking, since it really helps prevent sugar from crystallizing.

I found that when I added just a couple tablespoons of light corn syrup to the cream cheese icing, it helped make it stable at room temperature and slice really cleanly. You can leave it out if you’re dead set against it, but you’ll find that the icing needs to be kept chilled a bit as it will be less firm.

Of course, you don’t have to “decorate” the icing with the tines of a fork and a spoon. That’s just a fun extra step to ensure that the cake looks just like the actual Entenmann’s iced carrot cake. 

A classic gluten free carrot cake made in the Entenmann's style, with crushed pineapple in the batter. Remember the taste? Have it again!

How to make the most tender and fluffy carrot cake

Of course, I hope you’ll follow the recipe exactly as written, measuring all of your ingredients carefully by weight, not volume. Every week I get emails from readers who have gone out of their way to compare the weight and volume of their ingredients as they measure them out and get worried when they don’t correspond to my ingredients. 

But that’s the whole point of measuring by weight, not volume! Volume is simply too variable (volume containers are not standardized), and human error is unavoidable.

When I first developed this recipe, I didn’t bother to beat the wet ingredients separately from the dry ingredients. The recipe still turned out great, of course, or I wouldn’t have published it, I promise. But when I beat the wet ingredients well, I found that the cake baked more evenly and was less likely to burn on the bottom.

That just means that you’ll need to start by whisking together the dry ingredients in a large bowl, tossing in the grated carrots and raisins and setting that bowl aside. Then, beat the wet ingredients, including the sugars, really well before combining everything. 

Baking the cake at 325°F for a few more minutes, rather than 350°F which is standard for most cakes, also helps ensure that the cake bakes perfectly every time. 

A classic gluten free carrot cake made in the Entenmann's style, with crushed pineapple in the batter. Remember the taste? Have it again!

Ingredients and substitutions

Luckily, there aren’t many additional allergens in this recipe. But here are my recommendations for what we’ve got:

Dairy-free: The cake itself, like most carrot cakes, is made with a neutral oil in the batter, not butter. That means that the cake is naturally dairy-free. The cream cheese icing is definitely made with dairy, though. 

I’ve successfully made cream cheese icing without dairy, though. Please see the ingredients and substitutions section in my recipe for gluten free carrot cake or cupcakes for all the details. 

Egg-free: There are 4 eggs in this recipe, so I’m afraid I really don’t think it can be made without eggs entirely. They’re doing some really heavy lifting in this recipe! So sorry.

Corn-free: In place of cornstarch, try using arrowroot. It should work just fine. Potato starch would also probably be fine.

Raisins: Raisins in baked goods aren’t usually a favorite of mine. I even make my classic oatmeal cookies with chocolate chips instead of raisins! You can replace them here with chopped nuts, or even chocolate chips. I wouldn’t leave them out without a replacement, though, since the recipe is built around a mix-in.

I find that it’s really important to use good quality raisins. If you’re concerned that your raisins aren’t very fresh (which mine often aren’t since I don’t bake with them all the time), try soaking them in hot water for a couple minutes and then laying them out on a paper towel to dry. Measure the amount for the recipe by weight after you’ve revived your raisins. If you’d prefer, try using currants if they’re available. They tend to be more tender than raisins.

 

Entenmann's-Style Gluten Free Iced Carrot CakeA classic gluten free carrot cake made in the Entenmann's style, with crushed pineapple in the batter. Remember the taste? Have it again! #glutenfree #gf #carrotcake #easter

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Prep time: Cook time: Yield: 1 9-inch cake

Ingredients

For the cake
1 1/2 cups + 2 tablespoons (228 g) all purpose gluten free flour blend (I used Better Batter)

3/4 teaspoon xanthan gum (omit if your blend already contains it)

6 tablespoons (54 g) cornstarch

1 teaspoon baking soda

1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

3 cups (270 g) peeled and grated carrots

3/4 cup (120 g) raisins

4 eggs (240 g, weighed out of shell) at room temperature, beaten

1/2 cup (112 g) neutral oil (vegetable, canola, or grapeseed all work well)

3/4 cup (150 g) granulated sugar

1/2 cup (109 g) packed light brown sugar

1/2 cup (130 g) canned crushed pineapple, in its own juice (heavy on the juice)

For the Cream Cheese Icing
8 ounces cream cheese, at room temperature

6 tablespoons (84 g) unsalted butter, at room temperature

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

2 tablespoons (42 g) light corn syrup (optional)

3 to 3 1/2 cups (345 g to 403 g) confectioners’ sugar

Directions

  • Preheat your oven to 325°F. Grease a 9-inch square baking pan and line it with criss-crossed sheets of unbleached parchment paper. Set the pan aside.

  • Make the cake batter. In a large bowl, place the flour, xanthan gum, cornstarch, baking soda, baking powder, salt, and cinnamon. Whisk to combine well. Add the shredded carrots and raisins, and mix to combine and separate all of the raisins and carrots from one another. In a separate, medium-sized bowl, place the eggs, oil, granulated sugar, brown sugar, and crushed pineapple in its juice, and beat with a handheld mixer until well-combined. Create a well in the center of the bowl of dry ingredients, pour in the wet ingredients, and mix to combine well. The batter will be thickly pourable.

  • Bake the cake. Pour the batter into the prepared cake pan, and shake back and forth to distribute the batter evenly in a single layer. Place the pan in the center of the preheated oven and bake for about 50 minutes, or until golden brown all over and a toothpick inserted in the center of the cake comes out with no more than a few moist crumbs attached. Remove the pan from the oven from the oven and allow the cake to cool in the pan for 10 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.

  • Make the icing. While the cake is cooling, make the icing. In the bowl of your stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment (or a large bowl with a handheld mixer), place the cream cheese and butter. Beat on medium speed until soft and fluffy. Add the salt, optional corn syrup and 3 cups of confectioners’ sugar. Mix on low speed until the sugar is absorbed. Then, turn the mixer to high speed and beat until the frosting is thickened and fluffy. Add more confectioners’ sugar as necessary to achieve the desired thickness. If you haven’t used the corn syrup, cover the bowl and place the frosting in the refrigerator to chill until stiffened slightly, about 15 minutes. Cover the cooled cake in a thick, even layer of frosting. To make the Entenmann’s-style decoration on the icing, drag the tines of a large fork in the frosting across the cake, leaving 1-inch between lines and cleaning the tines in between. Then, drag a wet spoon lightly across the lines from the fork tines in a diagonal, leaving 1-inch between diagonal lines. Slice into squares and serve.

  • Originally published on the blog in 2015. Photos, video, and some text new; recipe method modified slightly.

Love,
Nicole

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