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No Bake Chewy Peanut Butter Granola Bars

No Bake Chewy Peanut Butter Granola Bars

These homemade peanut butter granola bars are chewy bars made with oats and honey. Skip the boxed bars and grab these healthy, no bake treats instead.

These homemade peanut butter granola bars are chewy bars made with oats and honey. Skip the boxed bars and grab these healthy, no bake treats instead.

Granola bars, the Minutemen of breakfast or snack time

You know that feeling of free-floating anxiety, the kind that you can’t quite pin down? For me, it usually comes from a lack of control. And when you’re responsible for the well-being of others (like children), there is so much that’s always going to be out of your control.

Of course, having a refrigerator (or freezer) stocked with all sorts of grab-and-go breakfast snacks doesn’t actually solve whatever is really bothering me. But it does honestly give me a feeling of control.

The older I get, the more I accept that feeling is fact. And having homemade peanut butter granola bars on hand makes me feel like I’m more in control.

These homemade peanut butter granola bars are chewy bars made with oats and honey. Skip the boxed bars and grab these healthy, no bake treats instead.

These bars not as healthy, of course, as a piece of fruit or, say, a bowl of unsweetened muesli. But the combination of whole grain oats, coconut, protein-packed nut butter and healthy fat from virgin coconut oil means that these bars are way healthier than the boxed kind.

These homemade peanut butter granola bars are chewy as the day is long, don’t require you to fire up the oven, and keep forever in the refrigerator (even longer in the freezer). Like any sort of granola bar, certain ingredients are interchangeable within their particular categories, such as mix-ins (like chocolate chips), sugars (like brown sugar and honey), fats (like virgin coconut oil), aromatics (like vanilla), and bulk (like oats, oat flour and crisp rice cereal).

These homemade peanut butter granola bars are chewy bars made with oats and honey. Skip the boxed bars and grab these healthy, no bake treats instead.

The art of breakfast and snacking right

Before they head off to school in the morning, I like to make sure that my kids aren’t hungry at all. I know the whole idea of breakfast’s being the most important meal of the day has been debunked, but hunger is distracting. The wait until lunchtime can be long.

When they come home from school, they’re always hungry. I want to make something satisfying available to them. But ever since my kids were little, I’ve been wary of ruining their appetites for dinnertime. It probably isn’t for the virtuous reason you think, though!

These homemade peanut butter granola bars are chewy bars made with oats and honey. Skip the boxed bars and grab these healthy, no bake treats instead.

Since my kids are (nearly) all teenagers, I’m past the point of expecting that I can expand their palates. They like what they like at this point, and they likely won’t revisit those preferences until long after they’ve graduated from high school.

But a hungry dinner companion is a more forgiving, less picky and overall more pleasant dinner companion. So I want them to eat something filling, but as quickly as possible. That way, they have time to rebuild an appetite before dinner.

These homemade peanut butter granola bars are chewy bars made with oats and honey. Skip the boxed bars and grab these healthy, no bake treats instead.

Having snacks like these peanut butter granola bars on hand is essential. A granola bar, a piece of fruit or a small yogurt, and my kids are willing to get started on their homework.

I’ll make a double recipe of these and other granola bars or breakfast cookies, and wrap them tightly. When my kids open the refrigerator, they’ll almost always find my stash. Grab … and go.

These homemade peanut butter granola bars are chewy bars made with oats and honey. Skip the boxed bars and grab these healthy, no bake treats instead.These homemade peanut butter granola bars are chewy bars made with oats and honey. Skip the boxed bars and grab these healthy, no bake treats instead.

Ingredients and substitutions

If you have dietary restrictions beyond what is already specified in the recipe, I’ll do my best to help you out in this section. This recipe for homemade peanut butter granola bars is already dairy-free if you use dairy-free chocolate chips, or just leave the chips out.

Peanut butter: I specify a no-stir peanut butter in the ingredients list, which sometimes that causes confusion. All I mean by “no-stir” is the type of nut butter that doesn’t have separated oil at the top of the jar when it’s first opened.

Nut butter that doesn’t need to be stirred is much thicker at room temperature. That’s helpful, especially in a no-bake granola bar. If you’d like to use another no-stir nut butter, like Barney Butter almond butter, I’m confident it would work quite well.

If you’d like to use a simpler, entirely natural nut butter or even a homemade nut butter, you’ll have to experiment. I’m concerned that the bars simply won’t set up. If you’d like to make them without any nut butter at all, please see my recipe for basic no bake granola bars.

Oats: In the U.S., there are certified gluten free oats that are grown on dedicated gluten-free fields and stored in dedicated silos. We use them all the time. I never buy oats that are more processed than old-fashioned rolled oats. For oat flour, I simply grind them in a blender or food processor as finely as possible.

Oats can be replaced in baking. Oat flour should be replaced with quinoa flakes and the old-fashioned oats with beaten rice, but click through the link in the previous sentence for a complete explanation.

Honey: If you can’t have honey or you’d like to make this recipe vegan, you can try replacing the honey with agave syrup or Lyle’s golden syrup. In general, liquid sweeteners should be replaced with other liquid sweeteners of similar thickness, and granulated sugars with granulated ones.

Brown sugar: The brown sugar in this recipe can be replaced with coconut palm sugar, an unrefined sugar. To make sure that it melts properly when heated with the other wet ingredients, try grinding the coconut palm sugar into a fine powder in a blender or food processor first.

How do you handle breakfast and snacks in your house? Even though I’ve been a mom for 16 years, there are definitely tips and tricks that you can share that have never occurred to me. Let’s help each other get through, especially in the mad back-to-school dash!

These homemade peanut butter granola bars are chewy bars made with oats and honey. Skip the boxed bars and grab these healthy, no bake treats instead. #peanutbutter #pb #granolabars #glutenfree #gf

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Prep time: Cook time: Yield: 10 bars

Ingredients

1 1/2 cups (150 g) old-fashioned rolled oats (certified gluten free if necessary)

1 cup (120 g) oat flour (certified gluten free if necessary)*

2 cups (60 g) crisp rice cereal (gluten free if necessary)

1/2 cup (40 g) unsweetened coconut chips

4 tablespoons (56 g) virgin coconut oil

1/2 cup (109 g) packed light brown sugar

1/2 cup (168 g) honey

3/4 cup (192 g) smooth no-stir peanut butter

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

3 ounces miniature semi-sweet chocolate chips (optional)

*I never buy oat flour or even quick-cooking oats. I just process old-fashioned rolled oats in a food processor or blender either a little (quick-cooking oats) or a lot (oat flour).

Directions

  • Line an 8-inch square baking dish with crisscrossed sheets of unbleached parchment paper, with the paper overhanging all 4 sides of the dish, and set it aside. In a large bowl, place the rolled oats, oat flour, rice cereal and coconut chips, mix to combine well and set the bowl aside.

  • In a medium-sized heavy-bottom saucepan, place the coconut oil, brown sugar, honey, and salt, and cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until the mixture liquifies and comes to a simmer. Cook undisturbed for 45 seconds more, and then remove from the heat. Add the vanilla and peanut butter, stirring constantly until the mixture stops bubbling. Allow the mixture to cool slightly, until no longer hot to the touch. Create a well in the center of the dry ingredients in the large bowl, pour in the warm peanut butter and sugar mixture and mix throughly. Continue to mix until all of the dry ingredients have been absorbed into the mixture. If adding the miniature chocolate chips, allow the mixture to sit until cool to the touch or the chips will melt completely. Mix the chips until evenly distributed throughout.

  • Transfer to the prepared baking dish and press very firmly into an even layer. Allow to sit at room temperature until cool and set. To speed the process, refrigerate the dish for about 15 minutes. Place the bars on a cutting board and, using a large, sharp knife, cut into 10 rectangles. Wrap each bar separately and store at room temperature until ready to serve.

Love,
Nicole

Easy Muesli Recipe

Easy Muesli Recipe

This easy homemade muesli recipe is made with just a few basic pantry ingredients, and you can use it to make a cooked porridge or enjoy it as a breakfast topping. It’s also one step removed from granola, if that’s what you’re feeling.

This easy homemade muesli recipe is made with just a few basic pantry ingredients, and you can use it to make porridge or enjoy it as a breakfast topping.

Is muesli good for you?

It never fails. I place a recipe in front of my oldest child, she eats it. My first clue that she likes it is if she asks the question…

Is this good for you?

I love that she cares about health and nutrition. Unfortunately, I’m not a nutritionist, but I do want to give her the answer to the question she’s really asking: can I eat this often and not feel bad about it?

Some recipes, like traditional chocolate cake and chocolate chip cookies, just aren’t good for you and aren’t meant to be. They’re treats, and whether you eat them once a year or every day, you know that you’re not feeding your body what it needs. And it’s really o-kay.

But there are plenty of recipes that fall into the middle ground between healthy … and not. Sometimes it’s a matter of what else you eat throughout the day that determines the health of a particular meal. Other times, it’s a matter of what you pair it with. Eating a salad covered in cheese, dressing, and croutons just is not going to help your overall health.

This easy homemade muesli recipe is made with just a few basic pantry ingredients, and you can use it to make porridge or enjoy it as a breakfast topping.

Whether you consider this muesli to be healthy also depends upon what sort of eating rules you’re trying to stick to. This muesli recipe is, indeed, healthy as it’s packed with healthy fats, whole grains and has no added sugars, refined or otherwise.

The dried apricots add natural sweetness, but you can limit those as much as you like. Same goes for the honey, which is just a serving suggestion. And this muesli is really satisfying and should keep you full for quite a while.

If you’re following Weight Watchers, this recipe is better than adding sweetened granola to your milk or yogurt. But the nuts are relatively high in SmartPoints, so you’ll want to sprinkle just a handful on top of your fat-free plain yogurt.

This easy homemade muesli recipe is made with just a few basic pantry ingredients, and you can use it to make porridge or enjoy it as a breakfast topping.

How do you prepare muesli?

In its most basic form, muesli is like a Swiss granola. But rather than the clumpy, stickiness of granola, muesli is typically made from raw or near-raw individual nuts, seeds, and rolled oats.

Typically, the individual ingredients in muesli are combined, stored and served together. I prefer to combine the nuts and seeds together for toasting in the oven, and store them together. But I keep the toasted coconut chips separate, as I do the chopped, dried fruit.

In the instructions of this recipe, I toast and store the hemp seeds together with the oats. But they could just as easily be toasted and stored with the nuts and other seeds.

The nuts and seeds are chopped with a knife, rather than a food processor. You want them to remain crunchy, and a food processor has a tendency to turn nuts and seeds into dust rather quickly.

If you can find them, buy raw nut pieces rather than whole nuts. They’re less expensive and it saves you the trouble of having to chop them!

This easy homemade muesli recipe is made with just a few basic pantry ingredients, and you can use it to make porridge or enjoy it as a breakfast topping.

Muesli can be served cold, by soaking it for about 10 minutes in milk or water, or overnight in the manner of overnight oats. It can also be served hot, by cooking on the stovetop as you would oatmeal.

I always serve muesli cold unless I cook the toasted oats separately in water on the stovetop (I like a 1 cup of oats to 1 1/2 cups of water ratio) until creamy. Then, I add the other ingredients to the top when serving.

This easy homemade muesli recipe is made with just a few basic pantry ingredients, and you can use it to make porridge or enjoy it as a breakfast topping.

What is the difference between muesli and granola?

Both muesli and granola are a combination of oats, nuts and seeds and are traditionally eaten for breakfast. The main difference between muesli and granola, though, is that muesli is loose and largely unsweetened in its pre-served state.

Granola is typically seasoned with salt and spices. It’s made with sweeteners such as honey and maple syrup, and baked until it clumps and holds together.

Muesli is a mixture of loose, unsweetened ingredients. I don’t mix all of the ingredients until I’m ready to serve them. I have a family of 5, and everyone has their own tastes and preferences.

Keeping most of the ingredients separate allows each family member to customize their breakfast. More choices means less whining. And less whining is the key to my peace of mind. ✌️

This easy homemade muesli recipe is made with just a few basic pantry ingredients, and you can use it to make porridge or enjoy it as a breakfast topping.

Can you use muesli as the basis to make a granola bar?

Yes, you can use muesli as the basis for a simple granola bar recipe! Since the ingredients in granola and muesli are so similar, but muesli is the simpler of the two recipes, I’m more likely to make muesli than granola.

If I have muesli, I can toss it with some oil and sweeteners and make maple almond granola in no time. I can sprinkle it on top of my morning yogurt.

And I can also use it as the base for my no bake granola bars. Just measure out 2 cups of the toasted oats, add 1/2 cup oat flour, toasted coconut flakes, and the honey, coconut oil, brown sugar, salt and vanilla.

You can either use the crisp rice cereal as directed in the recipe or replace it by volume with a combination of toasted nuts and seeds. Since the recipe is no-bake, most of the bulk-forming ingredients are interchangeable. For a more complete discussion of how granola bars are made, have a look at my master granola bar recipe.

This easy homemade muesli recipe is made with just a few basic pantry ingredients, and you can use it to make porridge or enjoy it as a breakfast topping.

Ingredients and substitutions

The fresh fruit, honey, and milk at the end of the ingredients list are all optional ingredients that can be replaced with whatever you like, or left out entirely. This recipe can be customized by replacing or eliminating many of the ingredients below, within the guidelines listed here:

Nuts and seeds: I’ve grouped nuts and seeds together, even as I’ve kept most of the other ingredients separate from one another in toasting and storing. As long as they’re all chopped into similar sizes, and are all raw and unsalted, nuts and seeds are interchangeable with one another in this recipe.

Pumpkin seeds and sunflower seeds are nut-free alternatives to nuts, so feel free to use tons of those. Roasted, unsalted soybeans are also a great addition, but I’d buy them already roasted. Otherwise, you’ll have to soak, dry and then roast them. That’s a lot of work for one ingredient in a multi-ingredient recipe!

Coconut flakes: Coconut flakes add a really nice depth of flavor when they’re toasted, and they’re really beautiful, too, when served toasted. If you want or need to replace them, you can use more oats, or more nuts and seeds.

Hemp seeds: Hemp seeds can be replaced with any number of small seeds, like flax, chia or sunflower seeds. They add texture and tons of nutrition to this muesli recipe.

Oats: This recipe is naturally gluten free as long as you use certified gluten free oats, but if you’re not following a gluten free diet, you can use any sort of oats you like. If you’re not comfortable eating oats on a gluten free diet, or simply can’t have them, you can replace them in any recipe that calls for oats.

In this recipe, if I were to replace oats, I’d likely use beaten rice, or poha. You can also replace the oats with more coconut flakes. Crisp rice cereal can also be toasted in the oven in the manner described for toasting coconut flakes and used for bulk. Just don’t soak the muesli in milk, yogurt or water before serving it.

Dried apricots: I chose chopped, dried apricots for this recipe because I love the way they taste, and their color. They add a chewy texture, too, that balances out the other ingredients whether you soak the muesli or not. You can, of course, use any other dried fruit that you like.

Dried blueberries, cranberries or golden raisins are all great choices. Of course, they’re all already small in size, there’s no need to chop them.

This easy homemade muesli recipe is made with just a few basic pantry ingredients, and you can use it to make porridge or enjoy it as a breakfast topping. #muesli #granola #glutenfree #gf #breakfast #healthy

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Prep time: Cook time: Yield: 7 1/4 cups

Ingredients

3/4 cup (90 g) raw almonds

1/2 cup (60 g) raw pistachio nut meats

1/2 cup (60 g) raw cashews (pieces are fine)

3/4 cup (60 g) raw pumpkin seeds

3 cups (300 g) old-fashioned rolled oats (certified gluten free, if necessary)

2 tablespoons (20 g) raw hemp seeds

1 cup (60 g) unsweetened coconut chips

3/4 cup (180 g) dried apricots

Fresh berries, honey, and milk, yogurt, or water, for serving (optional)

Directions

  • Preheat your oven to 325°F. Line 3 medium-sized rimmed baking sheets with unbleached parchment paper and set them aside.

  • Using a sharp chef’s knife, roughly chop the almonds, pistachios, cashews and pumpkin seeds, and place on one of the baking sheets. Toss the nuts together with your hands and spread into an even layer on the baking sheet. Place in the center of the preheated oven and toast for about 15 minutes, or until very lightly toasted and fragrant. If the baking sheet is small and the nuts are in a relatively thick layer, they will take longer to toast. Remove them from the oven and set aside to cool and place in a sealed glass jar.

  • On a second prepared baking sheet, place the oats and hemp seeds, and toss them to combine. Place in the center of the preheated oven and toast, stirring occasionally to prevent burning, until very lightly golden brown (about 12 minutes). Remove from the oven, set aside to cool and place in a sealed glass jar.

  • On the third prepared baking sheet, place the coconut chips, and spread them into an even layer. Place in the center of the preheated oven and toast until very lightly golden brown (about 5 minutes). Remove from the oven, set aside to cool and place in a sealed glass jar. Using a sharp chef’s knife or sharp kitchen shears, roughly chop the apricots. Place in a sealed glass jar.Store the prepared ingredients in their individual sealed jars at room temperature for up to a week. Alternatively, the ingredients can all be tossed together to combine and stored in a large glass jar.

  • Serve by layering in a bowl, adding fresh berries, honey, and just enough milk, water or yogurt to cover the muesli. Allow the muesli to soak in the liquid for about 10 minutes (or in the refrigerator, covered, overnight) until the toasted oats are softened.

Love,
Nicole

Banana Oatmeal Cookies

Banana Oatmeal Cookies

These whole grain banana oatmeal cookies are soft and chewy, sweetened only with bananas and honey and a few chocolate chips. This is one recipe you’re going to want to double!

These whole grain banana oatmeal cookies are soft and chewy, sweetened only with bananas and honey and a few chocolate chips. The perfect grab and go breakfast for busy mornings!

Baking with bananas

If you don’t like the taste of bananas, then this recipe definitely isn’t for you! Don’t despair, though. This recipe for simple oatmeal breakfast cookies is a great option. So are these pumpkin oatmeal breakfast cookies.

If you’re like my family and you have a constant rotation of underripe and overripe bananas, both on your kitchen counter and in your freezer, pull up a seat.🛋 You’re in the right place.

Bananas add a natural sweetness to everything from banana bread (how about one with a cinnamon swirl?) to banana muffins and even banana oatmeal muffins. Once they’re almost uncomfortably ripe, you can either bake with them right away or peel, chop and freeze them in a single layer. Then, pile them into a ziptop bag and use them in almost any way you would use fresh bananas.

You can blend your frozen bananas into a smoothie, or thaw them out on the countertop or in the microwave. Then, mash those ripe bananas and bake with them as normal.

One of my favorite ways to bake with them is by pairing them with oats. The creaminess of bananas is a natural complement to the chewiness of oats.

These whole grain banana oatmeal cookies are soft and chewy, sweetened only with bananas and honey and a few chocolate chips. The perfect grab and go breakfast for busy mornings!

Why these cookies are for breakfast, not dessert

If you’re looking for traditional gluten free oatmeal cookies to satisfy a hankering for everyone’s second favorite buttery dessert cookie, this is not that recipe! That oatmeal cookie recipe is made to be eaten at the end of the day, with a tall glass of milk.

This recipe is meant to be enjoyed with a hot cup of morning coffee—or on the run if that’s how your day is working out. It’s made without any all purpose flour of any kind (gluten free or not). The structure is created by oats in two forms (rolled oats and oat flour).

These whole grain banana oatmeal cookies are soft and chewy, sweetened only with bananas and honey and a few chocolate chips. The perfect grab and go breakfast for busy mornings!

I would never call this recipe flourless, though, since I take that term very literally. If I’m calling a recipe flourless, that means that there’s nothing in the recipe that’s been ground into a flour. That means no oat flour, no almond flour, and no rice flour at all.

Since this recipe is made without any refined grains, and only honey and mashed bananas for sweetness, it’s much healthier than a traditional dessert cookie. It does have a few chocolate chips, but you can leave those out or replace them with chopped raw nuts if you’d prefer.

These whole grain banana oatmeal cookies are soft and chewy, sweetened only with bananas and honey and a few chocolate chips. The perfect grab and go breakfast for busy mornings!

How to make this recipe in one bowl

Whenever possible, I write my recipes to be made in one single bowl. These banana oatmeal cookies aren’t very fussy at all and can tolerate a few substitutions quite easily. (See the “Ingredients and substitutions” section below for full substitution information.)

But as written the recipe will require a bowl to melt the butter, and one to beat the egg. Here’s how the recipe is written.

Combine the dry ingredients (oats, oat flour, baking soda and salt) in a large bowl and whisk them to combine. Then create a well in the center of the dry ingredients with a spoon.

Next, add the wet ingredients (melted butter, banana, egg, and honey) in the center. The well you’ve created in the dry ingredients allows the wet ingredients to be mixed into the dry in just a few strokes.

These whole grain banana oatmeal cookies are soft and chewy, sweetened only with bananas and honey and a few chocolate chips. The perfect grab and go breakfast for busy mornings!

Since you’ll need melted butter and a beaten egg, if you’d rather make the recipe in precisely one single bowl, there’s another way. Flip the preparation of the wet ingredients with the preparation of the dry.

First, place the butter in a large bowl, and melt the butter in the microwave. Allow the melted butter to cool until it’s no longer hot to the touch. Mash the banana right into the melted butter, then add the egg and honey and beat with a fork to combine well.

Then, you can add the oats, oat flour, baking soda and salt to the wet ingredients and mix them into the soft cookie dough. Just be sure to mix it fully so the baking soda and salt aren’t concentrated in one single area of the mixture.

The cookies have so little fat in them that they won’t spread much at all during baking. So be sure to flatten the mounds of cookie dough with wet fingers before putting them in the oven.

These whole grain banana oatmeal cookies are soft and chewy, sweetened only with bananas and honey and a few chocolate chips. The perfect grab and go breakfast for busy mornings!

Ingredients and substitutions

I’ve made these cookies dairy-free, but I haven’t made them without the egg or without oats. If you have additional dietary restrictions, here are my best-educated guesses about replacing some of the ingredients in this recipe.

Egg-Free: Since there’s only 1 egg in this recipe, try replacing it with one “chia egg” (mix 1 tablespoon ground chia flour with 1 tablespoon lukewarm water and allow it to sit until it gels).

Dairy-Free: The only dairy in this recipe is unsalted butter, and it can be replaced with virgin coconut oil, gram for gram. Just be sure you’re using dairy free chocolate chips.

My favorite brand of dairy-free chocolate chips is Enjoy Life brand, but Nestle also makes a variety of chocolate chips that are top 8 allergen-free called “Simply Delicious.” They’re made with only 3 ingredients, and they taste great.

Oats: In the U.S., there are certified gluten free oats that are grown on dedicated gluten-free fields and stored in dedicated silos. We use them all the time.

For oat flour, I simply grind them in a blender or food processor as finely as possible. If I’m using oats in a recipe, I want some chew from them, so I never worry about having a superfine oat flour.

If you can’t or would rather not have oats for any reason, though, they can be replaced in gluten free baking. The oat flour should be replaced with quinoa flakes and the old-fashioned oats with beaten rice, but click through the link in the previous sentence for a complete explanation.

Honey: If you can’t have honey or you’d like to make this recipe vegan by replacing the egg as directed above, you can try replacing the honey with agave syrup or Lyle’s golden syrup. You could also replace it with light corn syrup, but it must be a liquid sweetener, not a granulated one.

These whole grain banana oatmeal cookies are soft and chewy, sweetened only with bananas and honey and a few chocolate chips. The perfect grab and go breakfast for busy mornings! #glutenfree #gf #breakfast #breakfastcookies #grabandgo

Like this recipe?

Prep time: Cook time: Yield: 12 cookies

Ingredients

1 1/4 cups (125 g) certified gluten free old-fashioned rolled oats

1 1/2 cups (180 g) certified gluten free oat flour

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

4 tablespoons (56 g) unsalted butter, melted and cooled

2 medium ripe bananas (200 g), peeled and mashed

1 egg (50 g, weighed out of shell) at room temp, beaten

1/4 cup (84 g) honey

3 ounces semi-sweet chocolate chips

Directions

  • Preheat your oven to 350°F. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with unbleached parchment paper and set it aside.

  • In a large bowl, place the oats, oat flour, baking soda and salt, and whisk to combine well. Create a well in the center of the dry ingredients, and add the butter, bananas, egg and honey, and mix to combine well. The dough will be very soft. Add the chips, and mix until evenly distributed throughout the dough. Place the bowl in the refrigerator and chill until firm (about 10 minutes). That will help the cookies hold their shape when scooped onto the baking sheet, rather than weeping and sliding.

  • Scoop the dough with a medium-size ice cream scoop (about 2 1/2 tablespoons in volume), and drop about 2 inches apart from one another on the prepared baking sheet. With wet fingers, press down on top of each piece of dough to spread into a disk about 3/4-inch thick.

  • Place the baking sheet in the center of the preheated oven and bake until golden brown around edges and set in center (about 18 minutes). Cool on the baking sheet until firm, then serve immediately. Leftovers can be frozen in a single layer on a lined baking sheet, then piled into a zip-top freezer bag until ready to eat. Defrost at room temperature or in the microwave before serving.

Love,
Nicole

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