Quantcast

Gluten Free Pizza Rolls | the perfect party food or snack

Gluten Free Pizza Rolls | the perfect party food or snack

Gluten free pizza rolls are the perfect finger food are they’re surprisingly easy to make. They even reheat well for an after-school snack!

Gluten free pizza rolls are the perfect finger food are they're surprisingly easy to make. They even reheat well for an after-school snack!

Remember pizza rolls?

I remember seeing commercials for Totino’s pizza rolls, where a hungry crowd of teenage boys found total happiness in a box of heat-and-eat snacks. I never really thought I’d have kids (go figure), but if I did, I thought it sounded awesome that they could feed themselves a warm, satisfying snack. 

Well, my teenage son has been gluten free since he was barely a toddler, and my house has been completely gluten free ever since then. So we’re not buying a box of Totino’s—and even though there are frozen gluten free pizza rolls for sale in grocery stores now, those gluten free frozen prepared foods are crazy expensive!

Plus, my children like real food that doesn’t come from a box. I’ve tried and failed to slip some frozen snacks into the mix, but I end up eating them just so they don’t go to waste. 

Tips for making these pizza rolls

This recipe is as easy as can be. The only real labor is in rolling out the dough and cutting it into rectangles, then filling each separately. 

We do have a recipe for muffin-style gluten free pizza bites here on the blog, which is made in a muffin tin. That’s the recipe to choose if you’re not interested in rolling out dough. No shame in that game!

Resist the urge to overfill the rolls. If you stuff them too full with sauce, it will leak everywhere. If you put in too much cheese, the same thing with happen. The leaked cheese is still delicious as it bakes on the pan, but the rolls will be empty!

You can use shredded cheese instead of diced cheese, but I find that shredded cheese is harder to keep in place during filling and shaping. You get more density of cheese in the center of the roll when it’s diced.

Be sure you slice those two vents in the top of each roll before baking. The rolls puff up nicely in the oven, and the steam will find a place to escape on its own if you don’t provide an exit. 

Gluten free pizza rolls are the perfect finger food are they're surprisingly easy to make. They even reheat well for an after-school snack!

How to make the gluten free pizza dough

I’ve used many different types of pizza dough over the years to make these pizza rolls. Some were recipes for actual pizza dough, and we’ll talk about the best recipes to use. Others have been less traditional wraps, like won ton wrappers and empanada dough

My current favorite way to make these pizza rolls is with our “2-ingredient” type pizza dough, made in the Weight Watchers style. I have used that style of dough so many times in so many different ways ever since modifying the original recipe to make a version of the 2-ingredient gluten free bagels

That dough is often referred to as “miracle dough” since a single recipe (made primarily with self-rising flour and Greek-style plain yogurt) can be used to make everything from bagels to rolls to pizza and nearly everything in between. I’ve found, though, that the recipe needs to be modified slightly (sometimes adding an egg white, sometimes using less yogurt, sometimes adding some water) for the best bread of each type.

Gluten free pizza rolls are the perfect finger food are they're surprisingly easy to make. They even reheat well for an after-school snack!

The Weight Watchers-style gluten free pizza dough recipe

I’ve only incorporated the pizza dough recipe below by reference, using a link to the dough recipe here on the blog. It helps keep the recipe looking as simple as it really is. 

But I thought it might be useful to have the dough recipe right here on this post, so here it is:

  • 1 cup (140 g) all purpose gluten free flour, plus more for sprinkling
  • 1/2 teaspoon xanthan gum (omit if your blend already contains it)
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 3/4 cup (170 g) nonfat Greek-style plain yogurt
  • 2 to 3 tablespoons lukewarm water

In a large bowl, place the flour blend, xanthan gum, baking powder, and salt, and whisk to combine. Add the yogurt and 2 tablespoons of water, and mix until the dough holds together well.

If necessary for the dough to clump and hold together easily, without feeling stiff to the touch, add another tablespoon of water and mix to combine. The dough can also be made in a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, but it’s not necessary. I only break out the stand mixer if I’m doubling or tripling the recipe.

Gluten free pizza rolls are the perfect finger food are they're surprisingly easy to make. They even reheat well for an after-school snack!

Ingredients and substitutions

Dairy-free: This is the rare recipe that is simple enough that it doesn’t contain more than one additional common allergen. There are a few different types of dairy in this recipe, but they can all be replaced. 

First, for help replacing the dairy-containing Greek yogurt in the pizza dough, please see the Weight Watchers-style gluten free pizza dough recipe itself. It’s all there. 

You can also use a gluten free pizza dough that doesn’t contain dairy in the original recipe. My basic gluten free pizza dough recipe works perfectly every time, every which way you might like to use it. 

You can replace the diced mozzarella cheese in the rolls with vegan mozzarella (my favorite brand is called Violife, but Daiya is also really good). I’ve done that, and although it doesn’t melt quite as well, it still makes a great pizza roll.

The cream can be replaced with an egg wash, which is just 1 egg beaten with a splash of nondairy milk (any kind). The point of the cream is simply to help the outside of the dough brown, and an egg wash does that just fine.

 

Gluten free pizza bites are the perfect finger food are they're surprisingly easy to make. They even reheat well for an after-school snack! #glutenfree #partyfood #pizza #snacks #superbowlGluten Free Pizza Rolls Finger Food

Like this recipe?

Prep time: Cook time: Yield: About 2 dozen pizza rolls

Ingredients

1 recipe Weight Watchers-style Pizza Dough

4 ounces low-moisture mozzarella cheese, diced

1/2 cup (4 fluid ounces) Simple Tomato Sauce (or your favorite tomato sauce), plus more for serving

Heavy whipping cream, for brushing

Directions

  • Preheat your oven to 400°F. Line a rimmed baking sheet with unbleached parchment paper and set it aside.

  • Prepare the pizza dough as directed without shaping it. Sprinkle a flat work surface lightly with gluten free flour, place the dough on top of it, and sprinkle it again lightly. Roll out the dough into a large rectangle that is about 1/4-inch thick. Fold the dough over on itself at least once and roll it again, to ensure you’re working with a smooth dough. With a pastry wheel, pizza wheel or sharp knife, slice the rolled-out dough into rectangles about 2 1/2-inches long x 1 1/2-inches wide. Gather and reroll scraps as necessary.

  • Working with each miniature rectangle at a time, roll it out again along its length until it’s a bit thinner. Place about 1 teaspoon of tomato sauce on one half of each rectangle, leaving at least a 3 cm of the edge of the dough bare. Place 3 to 4 pieces of chopped cheese (less if the cheese is cut into a larger dice) on top of the sauce. Do not overfill. Fold the clean half of the rectangle over the sauce and cheese, and press the edges together firmly to seal. Place the filled and shaped dough on the prepared baking sheet about 1-inch apart. Using the same pastry wheel, pizza wheel or sharp knife, slice two vents through the top layer of dough in each pizza roll. Using a pastry brush, brush each roll generously with the cream.

  • Place the baking sheet in the center of the preheated oven and bake for about 15 minutes, or until the cheese is bubbling and the pizza rolls are uniformly golden brown all over. Serve warm. This recipe can be easily doubled for a crowd. The rolls can also be wrapped tightly in a freezer-safe wrap, and frozen until ready to use. Defrost in the microwave or in a toaster oven until warmed throughout.

  • Originally published on the blog in 2013. Recipe updated to use a different pizza dough; photos, video all new.

Love,
Nicole

Paleo Chocolate Cake

Paleo Chocolate Cake

A moist and tender Paleo chocolate cake that’s rich in chocolate flavor, but not too sweet. Layer it with a deep chocolate frosting, and let’s celebrate!

A moist and tender Paleo chocolate cake that's rich in chocolate flavor, but not too sweet. Layer it with a deep chocolate frosting, and let's celebrate!

A Paleo recipe with more accessible ingredients

This Paleo chocolate cake is made with coconut flour, which can be a very tricky ingredient to use in baking. It tends to create a very spongy texture since it’s full of fiber and absorbs a ton of moisture. 

But it can be done! Remember our coconut flour pancakes? They’re made with a combination of coconut flour and tapioca starch/flour, just like this recipe. 

As with the pancakes recipe, we’ve avoided an overload of eggs in this cake by adding that starch and by finding other sources of moisture. 

No almond flour in this recipe

I really love baking with almond flour since it seems to mimic “regular flour” best (which for us means an all purpose gluten free flour), especially when you pair it with a Paleo-friendly starch like arrowroot or tapioca/starch. But there are a few issues that always pop up whenever we bake with almond flour.

All of my almond flour recipes call for a high-quality, finely ground, blanched almond flour, like Honeyville brand or the finely ground almond flour from nuts.com. I have never found an almond flour that’s available in a brick-and-mortar store that compares.

That means that baking with almond flour requires advance preparation. And sometimes you don’t have a well-stocked Paleo pantry, but you still really (really) want to bake a cake when you find it. Coconut flour is available nearly everywhere—and I’ve never really detected a difference from one brand to another. 

A moist and tender Paleo chocolate cake that's rich in chocolate flavor, but not too sweet. Layer it with a deep chocolate frosting, and let's celebrate!

What about the starch?

True, this recipe does call for tapioca starch/flour, and a good-quality brand of that ingredient can also be hard to find. But you can replace that starch with arrowroot, if you have it.

Or honestly, you can even use a non-Paleo starch like cornstarch or potato starch if you really want to make this cake. Let’s face it: there’s plenty of honey in this recipe, and starch really is starch.

What about the baking powder?

Speaking of starch, this recipe does call for baking powder. Baking powder is a combination of baking soda, cream of tartar, and a starch. If your cake must be strictly Paleo-legal, reach for Paleo-friendly baking powder (they do sell them now!).

If not, just use the regular stuff. I won’t tell. You could also make your own Paleo-friendly baking powder with  1 part baking soda, 2 parts cream of tartar and 1/2 part arrowroot or tapioca starch/flour. 

A moist and tender Paleo chocolate cake that's rich in chocolate flavor, but not too sweet. Layer it with a deep chocolate frosting, and let's celebrate!

Rich, chocolate frosting made with only 2 ingredients

Rather than try to make a buttercream frosting out of Paleo-friendly ingredients, I went with a simple Paleo chocolate ganache that I whipped into a spreadable frosting. Traditional ganache is made with chopped chocolate that’s melted by pouring lightly simmering heavy whipping cream on top. 

Here, we used coconut cream in place of heavy whipping cream. Just be sure you drain any liquid from the cream so the chopped chocolate doesn’t seize. Once the mixture is melted and smooth, let it cool to room temperature and then chill until just set. Then, whip the mixture until it’s fluffy and spreadable.

You could also use the rich ganache as a glaze by cooling it only slightly at room temperature. Then just pour it over the cakes. You could also whip half of the ganache and use it as a filling between the two cakes, then make the remaining half of the recipe and pour it over the top while it’s still warm. 

A moist and tender Paleo chocolate cake that's rich in chocolate flavor, but not too sweet. Layer it with a deep chocolate frosting, and let's celebrate!

Ingredients and substitutions

Since this is a Paleo chocolate cake recipe, by definition it is gluten-free and dairy-free, plus free of refined sugar. This is also a nut-free recipe, which is somewhat unusual for Paleo recipes, which typically rely heavily on almond flour. 

If you’ve got some questions about other ingredients, here goes nothin’: 

Coconut flour: Coconut flour is a completely unique flour that has no equal. You cannot replace it with anything else, I’m afraid. It is the most important ingredient in this whole recipe.

Tapioca starch/flour: Tapioca starch and tapioca flour are the same thing, and the terms are used interchangeably. However, tapioca starch is not all created equal. The only brands I can recommend are those from nuts.com, Authentic Foods, and Vitacost.com. 

If you would like to replace the tapioca starch/flour, you should be able to use arrowroot flour. In fact, the recipe from which this is adapted used arrowroot, so I’m sure it would work just fine. 

A moist and tender Paleo chocolate cake that's rich in chocolate flavor, but not too sweet. Layer it with a deep chocolate frosting, and let's celebrate!

Eggs: There are 4 total eggs in this recipe. I’m afraid that’s simply too many eggs to replace reliably. If you can’t have eggs, I’d avoid this recipe. So sorry!

Cocoa powder: I really like Dutch-processed cocoa powder in this recipe, but natural cocoa powder should work just fine. You cannot replace the cocoa powder. 

Coconut oil: The virgin coconut oil in this recipe should be able to replaced easily with Spectrum brand nonhydrogenated vegetable shortening. If you can have dairy, I bet unsalted butter would work just fine, too. 

Coffee: You need a total of 2/3 cup (5 1/3 fluid ounces) liquid in this recipe. I like to use mostly strong brewed coffee, with a splash of unsweetened almond milk. But you can use all of one or all of the other.

If you use brewed coffee, the answer is no! The cake does not taste like coffee. The coffee just helps to deepen the chocolate flavor of the cake, and decaffeinated coffee is fine. 

Honey: If you’d like to use another liquid sweetener, you’ll need something that is as thick and rich as honey. Maple syrup is not an appropriate substitute for honey, I’m afraid.

Liquid Lankato monkfruit alternative sweetener might work. If you try it, let us know how it goes!

If you can, make the recipe just as written at least once, so you know exactly how it’s meant to turn out. Then, you’ll always know you can make a celebration cake for any occasion that everyone can enjoy!

 

A moist and tender Paleo chocolate cake that's rich in chocolate flavor, but not too sweet. Layer it with a deep chocolate frosting, and let's celebrate! #paleorecipes #chocolatecake #glutenfree #dairyfree #birthday

Like this recipe?

Prep time: Cook time: Yield: 2 8-inch round cakes

Ingredients

For the cakes
1/2 cup + 3 tablespoons (88 g) coconut flour

1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons (90 g) tapioca starch/flour

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1 teaspoon baking powder (grain-free for very strict Paleo)

1 teaspoon baking soda

3/4 cup (60 g) unsweetened cocoa powder (Dutch-processed is best, but natural is fine)

1/4 cup + 1 tablespoon (70 g) virgin coconut oil, melted and cooled

1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons (210 g) honey

4 eggs (200 g, weighed out of shell) at room temperature, beaten

2/3 cup (5 1/3 fluid ounces) brewed strong coffee or unsweetened nondairy milk (or a combination)

For the frosting
12 ounces dark chocolate, chopped fine

8 ounces coconut cream

Directions

  • Preheat your oven to 350°F. Grease and line two 8-inch round metal baking pans, and set them aside. The pans should be light in color, so the cakes don’t bake too quickly.

  • In a large bowl, place the coconut flour, tapioca starch/flour, salt, baking powder, baking soda, and cocoa powder, and whisk to combine well. Add the oil, honey, eggs, and coffee and/or milk, and whisk until very smooth. The batter will be thickly pourable, and shouldn’t have any lumps. Divide the mixture evenly among the two prepared baking pans, tilting each pan to create an even layer of batter in it. Bang the bottom of each pan flat on the counter a few times to break any air bubbles.

  • Place the pans in the preheated oven, and bake for 15 minutes. Rotate the pans in the oven and continue to bake for about another 7 minutes, or until the cakes spring back when pressed gently in the center. Do not overbake. Remove the cakes from the oven and place them, still in the pans, on a wire rack to cool for about 15 minutes. Remove the cakes from their pans, place them directly on the wire rack and allow them to cool completely.

  • While the cakes are cooling, make the frosting. In a wide, flat, medium-sized and heat-safe bowl, place the chopped dark chocolate. Bring the coconut cream to a very gently simmer either in a pan over a low flame on the stovetop, or in the microwave in a heat-safe bowl. Pour the lightly simmering cream over the chopped chocolate and allow it to sit, undisturbed, for about 5 minutes before whisking until completely smooth. You can use the mixture to glaze the cakes as is, or allow it to set, then whip and use as frosting. To use the mixture as frosting, allow it sit until no longer warm to the touch, and then place in the refrigerator for about 20 minutes or until beginning to set. Using a handheld mixer or a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whip the frosting until lighter in color and relatively fluffy (about 3 minutes). Frost the cakes as desired, and then slice and serve.

  • Cake recipe adapted from The Loopy Whisk. Great recipe, Kat!

Love,
Nicole

Flourless Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies

Flourless Peanut Butter Chocolate Chip Cookies

This recipe for flourless peanut butter chocolate chip cookies, with only 6 simple ingredients, makes perfectly soft and chewy cookies. You’ll never believe they have no flour!

This recipe for flourless peanut butter chocolate chip cookies, with only 6 simple ingredients, makes perfectly soft and chewy cookies. You'll never believe they have no flour!

A twist on a classic peanut butter cookie

The most classic recipe for flourless peanut butter cookies is made with 1 egg, 1 cup peanut butter, and 1 cup granulated sugar. I’m not sure who first came up with that recipe, but the 1:1:1 ratio is the standard-bearer. 

I was never a really big fan of that cookie, though. It’s mostly crunchy in texture and typically bakes up very cracked. It might be an occupational hazard, but I really prefer something that can look more beautiful.

The first twist of that classic recipe I ever posted was these chocolate flourless peanut butter cookies. The addition of cocoa powder to the cookie dough really rebalances the recipe into a tender and chewy favorite. 

By adding one more egg and some baking powder to the 1:1:1 classic cookie, I found that we were able to have a plain chewy flourless peanut butter cookie, which I loved. But I still longed for the perfect texture of the chocolate ones.

That’s when I remembered how useful powdered peanut butter can be. By replacing the cocoa powder in that chocolate PB cookie recipe with powdered peanut butter, the texture is spot-on—and my new favorite peanut butter cookie.

Powdered peanut butter

I’ve been baking with powdered peanut butter for many years, long before it was available on the shelf in nearly every grocery store, right alongside the jars of good, old-fashioned peanut butter. It’s typically a dehydrated peanut butter, that has also had a fair amount of the fat removed from it. 

The brand we have used for years is PB2. But today, there are so many brands that even generic grocery store brands have gotten in on the action. I’ve only tried a few brands (some cheaper, some more spendy), but they all seem equivalent. Check labels carefully, but I’ve yet to run across a brand that isn’t gluten free (like almost all peanut butter itself is gluten free).

This recipe for flourless peanut butter chocolate chip cookies, with only 6 simple ingredients, makes perfectly soft and chewy cookies. You'll never believe they have no flour!

How to make these flourless peanut butter chocolate chip cookies

To make this recipe, the only equipment you need is one bowl, a spoon, and a baking sheet. The peanut butter goes in the bowl first, but you want it to be stirred easily.

If your peanut butter seems extra thick or dry at all, just pop the bowl in the microwave for less than 30 seconds. It will loosen right up. Add the brown sugar, egg, baking soda, and powdered peanut butter, then mix. 

When you first begin to combine the ingredients in the bowl, the cookie dough will seem rather soft. But keep stirring and it will thicken into a scoopable, moldable dough. If your cookie seems warm, let it cool a bit before adding the miniature chocolate chips or they’ll melt into the dough. 

Scoop the dough by the heaping tablespoon, and then roll it between your palms into a ball before flattening it into a disk. Add a few more mini chips on top, mostly for looks. 

For slightly thicker cookies, chill the shaped dough a bit. It will crack and spread a bit less. But even if you bake the dough without chilling it, the cookies will be soft and chewy.

Bake the cookies just until they become a more pale brown and no longer glisten in the center. If you bake them longer, they’ll be crispy around the edges. I like these cookies best when they’re super soft. 

This recipe for flourless peanut butter chocolate chip cookies, with only 6 simple ingredients, makes perfectly soft and chewy cookies. You'll never believe they have no flour!

Ingredients and substitutions

As long as you use dairy-free miniature chocolate chips (Enjoy Life brand is the best), these cookies are already dairy-free. Since this recipe is soooo simple, substitutions are risky. Here are my best guesses, though:

Peanuts: Since this recipe contains both smooth jarred peanut butter (“no-stir” just refers to the type of peanut butter that doesn’t separate in the jar, so it doesn’t need to be stirred after opening, unlike the more natural kinds) and powdered peanut butter, you really can’t make these cookies without nuts, or even with a different type of nut. 

I have used PB2 brand powdered peanut butter for years, and I’m thrilled that there are so many different brands available today. I used to have to order it by mail, and now it’s widely available. I’ve even seen some generic store brands! Just check the label to make sure there aren’t any gluten-containing additives, and they should be interchangeable.

If you’d like to make a similar cookie but nut-free, try using sunflower seed or soybean butter in our recipe for flourless chocolate peanut butter cookies. The cocoa powder in that recipe takes the place of the powdered peanut butter in this one. 

Sugar: You can try replacing the brown sugar in this recipe with an equal amount of coconut palm sugar. That sugar has a much larger grain, though, so grind the sugar into a finer powder first. You may also need to add a tiny bit of moisture to the dough since, unlike brown sugar, coconut palm sugar is very dry. 

You might be able to make this recipe without added sugar if you can find a sugar-free no-stir peanut butter, and replace the brown sugar with Swerve brown sugar alternative sweetener. I haven’t tried that, though, and I’d be concerned that the cookies would be very crumbly.

Egg-free: Since this recipe contains only 1 egg, I recommend that you try to replace it with one “chia egg” (1 tablespoon ground white chia seeds + 1 tablespoon lukewarm water, mixed and allowed to gel).

 

This recipe for flourless peanut butter chocolate chip cookies, with only 6 simple ingredients, makes perfectly soft and chewy cookies. You'll never believe they have no flour! #flourless #peanutbutter #cookies #glutenfreerecipes

Like this recipe?

Prep time: Cook time: Yield: 18 cookies

Ingredients

1 cup (256 g) smooth, no-stir peanut butter, warmed slightly

1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons (82 g) packed light brown sugar

1 egg (50 g, weighed out of shell) at room temperature, beaten

1 teaspoon baking soda

3 tablespoons (18 g) powdered peanut butter

3 ounces miniature semi-sweet chocolate chips

Directions

  • Preheat your oven to 325°F. Line a large rimmed baking sheet with parchment paper and set it aside.

  • In a large bowl, place the peanut butter, brown sugar, egg, baking soda, and powdered peanut butter. Mix to combine well. The mixture will be thin at first and will thicken quickly. Add all but about 2 tablespoons of the miniature chocolate chips, and mix until the chips are evenly distributed throughout the cookie dough. Scoop the dough into portions of about 1 1/4 tablespoons each (a #50 cookie scoop works really well here) and place about 1 1/2 inches apart on the prepared baking sheet. Roll each piece of dough tightly into a ball between your palms, and press into a disk about 1/4-inch thick. Place a few additional miniature chocolate chips on the top of each disk, and press gently to help them adhere. For slightly thicker cookies, place the baking sheet in the refrigerator for about 10 minutes or the freezer for about 5 minutes.

  • Place the baking sheet in the center of the prepared oven and bake for 11 minutes, or until the cookies are puffed and set toward the center. When they’re set, they’ll become more pale in color and the dough will no longer glisten. Remove the pan from the oven and allow the cookies to cool for at least 10 minutes on the baking sheet, or until firm. Serve immediately or store in a sealed container in the refrigerator until ready to serve. Freeze for longer storage.

Love,
Nicole

Back to Top

Where should I send your free guide?

By entering your email, you're agreeing to our Privacy Policy. We respect your email privacy, and will never share your information.