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Gluten Free Ravioli with Spinach and Cheese

Gluten Free Ravioli with Spinach and Cheese
Homemade gluten free ravioli are way easier to make than you might think. And they freeze perfectly!

Homemade gluten free ravioli are way easier to make than you might think. And they freeze perfectly!

The first time I made homemade ravioli, I nearly ran out of the kitchen screaming. It just was not worth the trouble.

Since then, I’ve got an easy method down pat, and I’ve come around in a big way. When I have the time, I love to make my own homemade gluten free pasta (click through that link—there’s a recipe + video!). 

So I’m always looking for different ways to use it. There’s something truly special about that fresh pasta taste. But let’s be honest. If you could just buy fresh sheets of gluten free pasta, wouldn’t you just do that?

Homemade gluten free ravioli are way easier to make than you might think. And they freeze perfectly!

If I could find affordably-priced fresh gluten free pasta that didn’t have a million ingredients, I’d totally buy it. Because that fresh pasta taste and texture is something you just have to experience.

You can buy gluten free frozen ravioli. I’ve tried plenty of brands, thinking I could recommend one. I didn’t care for any of them. Not a one.

You can buy fresh gluten free pasta in a few different shapes, but the price is completely nutso. I’ve grabbed it from the refrigerator (freezer?) case approximately 100 times at Whole Foods, and put it right back as many times.

I just…can’t…do….it. It’s just too expensive. In fact, with all the time I spent picking it up and putting it back, I bet I could have just made a batch of my own.

Homemade gluten free ravioli are way easier to make than you might think. And they freeze perfectly!

If you’re wondering if this is an everyday dish, one that you could make for a regular weeknight dinner, Imma say “no.” Not if you’re planning to make it start to finish under time pressure.

But the filled and shaped ravioli freeze so well. Just place them in a single layer on a flat surface like a lined, rimmed baking sheet and freeze. Once they’re frozen, pile them into a zip top bag and keep in the freezer.

You can boil them right from frozen. You’ll notice that the water stops boiling nearly the moment you add the frozen ravioli. Just cover the pot to help it return to a boil quickly. Once it boils, uncover the pot and start your 8 minute timer then.

Homemade gluten free ravioli are way easier to make than you might think. And they freeze perfectly!

Every one in my family adores these little gluten free ravioli beauties. Even though they’re stuffed with a ton of spinach, my avowed-vegetable-hating oldest child always gives them her highest seal of approval:

When she’s eating the ravioli, she asks, “are these in any way healthy for you?” That’s when you know. You’ve hit a home run.

Prep time: Cook time: Yield: 24 ravioli

Ingredients

1 recipe Fresh Homemade Gluten Free Pasta, prepared according to recipe instructions (click through for free recipe + video!)

1 egg (50 g, weighed out of shell), at room temperature

1/4 teaspoon kosher salt

1/8 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 1/2 cups (375 g) ricotta cheese, drained if necessary

10 ounces frozen spinach, thawed and squeezed dry

4 ounces low moisture mozzarella cheese, grated

2 ounces finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano Cheese

Tomato Sauce, for serving

Directions

  • Divide the fresh gluten free pasta into 4 equal portions. Using the instructions in that recipe as a guide, roll out each piece of dough into a rectangle about 8-inches wide by about 10 inches long, trimming rough edges with a sharp knife or pastry or pizza cutter. Slice each rectangle into 3 strips, each about 2 1/2 inches wide by 10-inches long. You should have 12 strips of pasta. Stack and cover them with a damp towel or plastic wrap and set it aside.

  • In a large bowl, place the egg, salt and pepper, and whisk to combine well. Add the ricotta, spinach, mozzarella cheese and about half of the Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese, and mix to combine.

  • On a flat surface, place 6 strips of the pasta side by side. Place dollops of about 1 tablespoonful of the filling, about 2 inches apart, along the length of the pasta. With wet fingers, moisten the perimeter of each piece of pasta dough, and moisten between each dollop of filling. Place one of the remaining 6 strips of pasta dough over one of the filled pieces, and press down to seal everywhere you moistened (along the perimeter and between each dollop of filling), eliminating any air bubbles. Repeat with the remaining pieces of dough.

  • Using a sharp knife or fluted pastry cutter, trim along the perimeter and between each dollop of filling to create square, filled raviolis. Transfer the raviolis to a flat surface sprinkled lightly with gluten free flour and allow to dry for about 10 minutes.

  • While the ravioli are drying, bring a large pot of salted water to a rolling boil. Place the ravioli in the water in batches, taking care not to crowd the water. Boil for about 8 minutes or until the ravioli have begun to swell in size and the dough is fork tender and the filling is cooked. Remove from the water with a slotted spoon or strainer and serve immediately with the tomato sauce and remaining Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese.

Love,
Nicole

Authentic Paleo Pizza

Authentic Paleo Pizza
This paleo pizza crust tastes just like the real thing, but is made without gluten, grains, or dairy. It’s the perfect primal canvas for all your favorite toppings!

This Paleo pizza crust tastes just like the real thing, but is made without gluten, grains, or dairy. It’s the perfect primal canvas for all your favorite toppings!

This paleo pizza crust tastes just like the real thing, but is made without gluten, grains, or dairy. It’s the perfect primal canvas for all your favorite toppings!

Please welcome back Becky Winkler of A Calculated Whisk, who will be sharing some of her favorite Paleo recipes from time to time on the blog.

Cauliflower and other veggie-based crusts are great, but sometimes you need something a little closer to classic pizza to satisfy your cravings. This Paleo pizza dough bakes up into a gorgeous pie with just the right amount of crunch around the edges.

The middle of the pie is more chewy than crispy, but holds its own well enough to not fold under the weight of whatever toppings you choose. You’ll just need two flours to make this Paleo pizza crust, and it will fool your friends with how close it tastes to traditional pizza.

This paleo pizza crust tastes just like the real thing, but is made without gluten, grains, or dairy. It’s the perfect primal canvas for all your favorite toppings!

Almond and tapioca flours work together to mimic all-purpose flour for this recipe, and yeast gives the dough that characteristic pizza crust flavor. Instead of sugar, honey is mixed with the yeast to get the process started.

Olive oil provides a hint of richness and the egg, coupled with the tapioca flour, gives the dough plenty of elasticity so it’s easy to work with. The dough only requires one forty-five minute rise, making it a viable option for weeknight dinners.

This paleo pizza crust tastes just like the real thing, but is made without gluten, grains, or dairy. It’s the perfect primal canvas for all your favorite toppings!

Once the dough has risen, it’s easy to pat out by hand on a piece of parchment—no rolling pin necessary. Preheat a baking sheet (use the back to give the pizza more room), brush the dough with a little olive oil, and pop the crust in the oven.

After baking for eight minutes, the pizza is ready for its toppings. Here I used marinara sauce, pepperoni, thinly sliced red onion, and dollops of cashew ricotta. The pizza goes back into the oven for five more minutes. After that, place it under the broiler for a minute or two to further brown the crust if you’d like.

This paleo pizza crust tastes just like the real thing, but is made without gluten, grains, or dairy. It’s the perfect primal canvas for all your favorite toppings!

Once out of the oven, I like to add a handful of fresh basil leaves and a few grinds of black pepper before slicing and serving. Since discovering this Paleo pizza crust, I’m been making homemade pizza night a weekly tradition. Next up I’m planning to try this with Italian sausage, caramelized onions, and kale.

What’s your favorite way to top pizza?

Prep time: Cook time: Yield: 1 12-inch pizza crust

Ingredients

⅓ cup (2 2/3 fluid ounces) warm water

3 tablespoons (42 g) extra virgin olive oil, plus more for brushing

1 tablespoon (21 g) honey

2 1/4 teaspoons active dry yeast

1 egg (50 g, weighed out of shell) at room temperature, beaten

½ teaspoon kosher salt, plus a pinch for sprinkling

1¾ cups (210 g) tapioca starch/flour, divided, plus more for dusting

1 cup (120 g) almond flour, plus more as needed

Pizza toppings, as desired

Directions

  • In a large bowl, place the warm water, olive oil, and honey and whisk to combine well. Sprinkle the yeast on top and let it sit for about 5 minutes, until foamy. Whisk in the egg. Add the salt and 1½ cups (180 g) of the tapioca flour and whisk until a smooth, sticky batter forms. Switch to a spatula or wooden spoon and stir in the almond flour, and then stir in the remaining tapioca flour. The dough should appear shaggy.

  • Dust your hands with a little tapioca flour and press the dough into a ball, kneading it a bit to get any floury bits mixed in. If it’s too sticky to come together, add additional almond flour a tablespoons at a time. Return the ball of dough to the bowl, cover it with plastic wrap, and set it in a warm place for 45 minutes (I usually set my oven to 200°F just for a couple minutes, then turn it off. I then place the bowl of dough in the oven, which is just a little above room temperature). The dough won’t double in size, but will get noticeably bigger. Place a pizza stone or large, overturned rimmed baking sheet in the oven and preheat to 400°F.

  • Place a large sheet of parchment paper on a flat surface, and, with lightly tapioca floured hands, transfer the ball of dough to the parchment. Pat the dough out into a circle about 12 inches in diameter, pushing out toward the edges to form a puffy rim of crust. Brush the top of the dough with a little bit of olive oil and sprinkle with a pinch of sea salt.

  • Carefully transfer the parchment with the dough onto the pizza stone or sheet pan and bake for 8 minutes. Remove the dough from the oven, prick the middle of the dough in several places with a fork, and add your desired toppings. Return to the oven and for about 5 minutes more. If desired, set the oven to broil and broil the pizza for up to two minutes until browned to your liking. Remove from the oven, slice, and serve hot. Any leftovers will reheat beautifully in just a few minutes in a 400°F oven.

Becky is a food photographer, recipe developer, and cookbook author who shares creative Paleo and gluten-free recipes on her blog, A Calculated Whisk. Her first cookbook, Paleo Planet, includes internationally inspired Paleo meals, desserts, sauces, spice blends, and more. Becky enjoys searing short ribs, chopping chocolate, photographing citrus fruit, and salting desserts. She lives in Chattanooga with her fiancé and his cat.

Thank you for welcoming Becky back today!

Love,
Nicole

Bakery-Style Gluten Free Blueberry Muffins

Bakery-Style Gluten Free Blueberry Muffins
These classic gluten free blueberry muffins are crisp on the outside, soft and tender inside. So easy to make, and they taste just like they came from your favorite bakery!

These classic gluten free blueberry muffins are crisp on the outside, soft and tender inside. So easy to make, and they taste just like they came from your favorite bakery!

These classic gluten free blueberry muffins are crisp on the outside, soft and tender inside. So easy to make, and they taste just like they came from your favorite bakery!

It was January 2014, and I thought you’d probably be interested in “diet” recipes. Since I’m old enough to have experienced the full force of the 1990s, I know that “low fat” usually means high in sugar and just heavy. And anyway hello fat is delicious.

So this gluten free blueberry muffin recipe started out as a “lighter” recipe. I even gave nutrition information and everything! But the muffins were so skimpy. It wasn’t long before I started tinkering with the recipe when I made it for my family.

These classic gluten free blueberry muffins are crisp on the outside, soft and tender inside. So easy to make, and they taste just like they came from your favorite bakery!

Here are my favorite gluten free blueberry muffins as I make them today at home. Usually, they’re studded with big juicy blueberries (frozen are fine!), but sometimes I replace the lemon juice with pure vanilla extract and the berries with chocolate chips.

[P.S. I even have a trick in the recipe for keeping frozen berries from bleeding all over the batter!]

In this updated version, the basic recipe isn’t low fat and low sugar. It’s not loaded with fat and sugar, but I’ll admit that it doesn’t skimp. I have notes on how to make it low fat and low sugar, though.

But before I get to the modifications you need to make for a “light” version of this recipe, I wanted to say a few words about buttermilk. There are so many ways to add buttermilk to a recipe, but they’re simply not all created equal.

These classic gluten free blueberry muffins are crisp on the outside, soft and tender inside. So easy to make, and they taste just like they came from your favorite bakery!

The highest and best way to add buttermilk is, indeed, with actual honest-to-goodness buttermilk from the dairy case at your grocer. It’s not just sour. It’s thicker and creamier than milk that’s simply had some lemon juice added to it.

But if you’re caught without that in the house, here’s my best trick: either half plain (no flavor) yogurt (Greek style is okay, too) or sour cream + half milk. This recipe calls for 6 fluid ounces buttermilk. You can use (and I have done!) 3 fluid ounces milk + the rest of the volume with yogurt or sour cream. Just mix well.

If you’d like a dairy free buttermilk, try half plain dairy free yogurt and half unsweetened almond milk. But full disclosure, I haven’t tried that. I just think it would work.

These classic gluten free blueberry muffins are crisp on the outside, soft and tender inside. So easy to make, and they taste just like they came from your favorite bakery!

Back to the lower fat version of this muffin. You can reduce the butter quite a bit (to 3 1/2 ounces or 7 tablespoons), and still have a tender muffin just by adding 3/4 cup nonfat Greek-style yogurt. Cut the sugar back to 3/4 cup (these are large muffins, so I wouldn’t go lower than that, but you can try 1/2 cup), and replace one of the eggs with 2 egg whites.

You’ll still have a tender muffin (plenty of tenderizers in that yogurt, buttermilk and lemon juice). Plus, the blueberries themselves help keep the muffins moist. And I added a few grains of coarse sugar on top, which adds a wee bit of calories (almost nothing) but since it’s right on top and caramelizes a bit in the oven, it adds a lot of sweetness.

The result? A lightly-sweet, seriously delicious gluten free blueberry muffin (any other berry would work great, too) that doesn’t sacrifice anything and doesn’t recall the dense muffins of the 1990s.


Prep time: Cook time: Yield: 12 muffins

Ingredients

2 1/2 cups (250 g) all-purpose gluten free flour (Better Batter works well)

1 1/4 teaspoons xanthan gum (omit if your blend already contains it)

1/4 cup (36 g) cornstarch (or try arrowroot)

2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1 1/4 cups (about 250 g) fresh or frozen blueberries*

10 tablespoons (140 g) unsalted butter, at room temperature**

1 cup (200 g) granulated sugar**

2 eggs (100 g, weighed out of shell), at room temperature**

3/4 cup (6 fluid ounces) low fat buttermilk, at room temperature

2 tablespoons (1 fluid ounce) freshly-squeezed lemon juice

Coarse sugar, for sprinkling (optional)

*If using frozen blueberries, do not defrost them, but do rinse them with cold water before tossing in the dry ingredients. This will help keep the color of the blueberries from bleeding into the batter during baking.

**For a “lighter” recipe that is lower in fat and sugar, in place of the butter, sugar and eggs in the amounts listed above, use the following (and leave the rest of the recipe unchanged):

  • 7 tablespoons (98 g) unsalted butter, at room temperature (in place of 10 tablespoons butter)
  • 3/4 cup (150 g) granulated sugar (in place of 1 cup (200 g))
  • 3/4 cup (170 g) Greek-style plain yogurt, at room temperature (addition)
  • 1 egg (50 g, weighed out of shell) + 2 egg whites (50 g), at room temperature (in place of 2 eggs)

Directions

  • Preheat your oven to 350°F. Grease or line a standard 12-cup muffin tin, and set it aside.

  • In a medium-size bowl, place the flour, xanthan gum, cornstarch, baking powder, baking soda, and salt, and whisk to combine well. Transfer 1 tablespoon of the dry ingredients to a small bowl, add the blueberries and toss to coat. Set both bowls aside.

  • In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a paddle attachment (or a large bowl with a hand mixer), place the butter and sugar and beat on medium-high speed until light and fluffy. Add the eggs, and beat until well-combined. Add half of the dry ingredients, then the buttermilk and lemon juice, followed by the remaining dry ingredients and beating until just combined after each addition. The batter will be quite thick. Add the blueberries and reserved dry ingredients, and gently fold the berries into the batter just until they are evenly distributed throughout.

  • Divide the batter evenly between the 12 prepared muffin wells, and smooth the tops with wet fingers. Sprinkle the top of each cup of batter lightly with the optional coarse sugar. Place in the center of the preheated oven and bake until a toothpick inserted in the center (and not in a blueberry) comes out with no more than a few moist crumbs attached (about 20 minutes). Remove from the oven and allow to cool in the muffin tin for 10 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.

  • Originally posted on the blog in 2014. Recipe modified from original the make larger muffins. “Lighter” recipe is now a traditional recipe with notes to make lower in sugar and fat. Photos all new.

Love,
Nicole

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