Tom Sawyer Gluten-Free Puff Pastry
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Imagine you’re creating a company that sells gluten-free flour. You have a name for your product, maybe you’re already selling it. But you need a website. Wouldn’t it be amazing … more »

Imagine you’re creating a company that sells gluten-free flour. You have a name for your product, maybe you’re already selling it. But you need a website. Wouldn’t it be amazing if you had the domain GlutenFreeFlour.com?

Hello, Tom Sawyer, you lucky dog, you.

I had never even heard of Tom Sawyer flour before Naomi of Better Batter mentioned it to me. She told me that it was big in the Western U.S. BIG. I’m in the Northeastern U.S. What did I know?

(Early P.S.: Oh, hey, are you in the Northeastern U.S., too? Wanna come bake with me?)

Add Tom Sawyer to the Great Gluten-Free Flour Test, Naomi said. Just do it!* She can be very convincing.

*Naomi actually didn’t boss me at all. Ever since I got laid off from my job as a big firm lawyer in 2009, ain’t nobody the boss of me. Except maybe my literary agent. She’s got a firm hand, and that’s no joke.

So here’s the Tom Sawyer pastry dough ball.

I kinda had some trouble rolling it out. It was sort of dry. Like the other day, it might have done well to be warmer. Mental note.

But I still created a dough-and-butter packet.

The first turn was a little … disappointing.

But by the final turn, it was smooth as silk.

To stave off boredom (how many times can a girl make gluten-free raspberry tartlets?), I made Gluten-Free Parmesan Cheese Straws.They’re super easy. Just roll out the dough to a bit more than 1/8 inch thick, allow it to warm a bit at room temperature so it’s not brittle, slice into strips about 1/2 inch thick and 6 inches long, brush with an egg wash, sprinkle with finely grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese (press down the cheese so it adheres), then twist. Bake at 350 degrees F until golden brown, about 10 minutes.

In the end, the pastry was light and flaky, and browned really evenly. And browning is really, really important to successful puff pastry. It gives it depth of flavor. And real Parmigiano-Reggiano is a must. It’s a touch spendy, but a little goes a long way.

*For the puff pastry recipe, including all the details about the method, see the first pastry challenge post (Better Batter Gluten-Free Puff Pastry).

Here are Tom’s deets:

Pastry Challenge
Attributes

Tom Sawyer
Score (1-10)

Cost$1.02/cup
Cup for cup replacement claim10
Cup for cup replacement result7.0
Ease of use6.0
Raw texture8.0
Cooked texture9.0
Finished appearance9.0
Finished taste9.5
Mouth feel9.5
Smell10

Oh, by the way, these little mini Weck jars are my new boyfriend.

Love,
Me

P.S. Tomorrow, DIY all-purpose gluten-free flour. Get out your checkbooks. It’s gonna be more expensive than you might think…

P.P.S. Next up in the Great Gluten-Free Flour Test, yeast bread. Anyone wanna go over/under on who wins?

P.P.P.S. I shall include a shameless self-promotion I-wrote-a-cookbook reminder here, at the end of posts. Because reciprocity is important. I love you. And I thank you.

12 Responses to “Tom Sawyer Gluten-Free Puff Pastry”

  1. Ej says:

    I have a question on the posted/referenced Herb Beer Bread (above). I was told by my MD to avoid malt and other beer grains. Do you find you are able to tolerate the beer grain/gluten in this bread?

    • Nicole says:

      Hi, Ej,
      The beer used is gluten-free. Traditional beer is gluten-containing and of course should be avoided. If you read through the post and the comments, you’ll see many names of gluten-free beers referenced.
      Nicole

  2. HRH says:

    Nicole, I LOVE your writing style, your wry sense of humor, your no b.s. straight to the point personality…. all that AND u bake! If only I weren’t married…. and straight. LoL
    Thanks for making me smile & flavoring my life! :D

  3. TJ says:

    I love the Weck jars, too! We have some 1 liter jars with lids that we use for milk (we’ve got dairy goats, and the jars are just the right size for ‘a little more than we expected’ days.

  4. Nicole, I was wondering if you are getting tired of puff pastry yet! Are you going to divulge your ultimate secret: how you are managing to consume all these puff pastries? Do you freeze it, have a large family, donate it to charity, or just start enjoy it all on your very own?

    • Nicole says:

      That’s a good question, Gina! Actually, the puff pastry has been much easier to use up than the cakes were during the cake challenge. I needed a big cake break after that – and gave much of it away to neighbors, sent it in with my husband to work. The puff pastry is much easier, since it’s so versatile: pot pies, tartlets, cheese straws, napoleons, danish. Not boring at all! And I can also freeze some of it and use it when I’m low on dinner inspiration.
      Thanks for stopping by again. Always happy to have a fellow gf blogger along for the ride. :)
      xoxo Nicole

  5. Anneke says:

    Hey Nicole — Just want to say here (as well as on Facebook) that your side by side comparison has been a great adventure for me. I know how careful you are to be fair and unbiased, and a little frosting difference or change of fruit will in no way diminish the results. Looking forward to the second half!
    Best,
    Anneke

    • Nicole says:

      Thanks so much for saying that, Anneke! I’m so happy you have found it interesting, and I especially appreciate that it’s important to you that the test be as fair and unbiased as possible. I may love Better Batter, but in this I am the public advocate!
      xoxo Nicole

  6. Julia says:

    I found Tom’s GF flour about two years ago. I make my “world famous” chocolate chip cookies – which is a ‘regular’ recipe – with Tom’s. No one and I mean no one is able to tell the difference. I share them with GF eaters and non-GF eaters alike and they all want the recipe! I will be curious when you do a test with yeast and Tom’s GF. I tried making a family sugar/egg/milk/yeast dough with the Tom’s GF and it didn’t turn out well. Thanks for doing all the great work you do!

    • Nicole says:

      Gluten-free yeast bread cannot be made successfully by substituting GF flour 1:1 for conventional flour, no matter whose flour it is, Julia. So if you did that, your family recipe wouldn’t work. That being said, I’m curious, too, to see how Tom’s performs in my GF bread recipe!
      xoxo Nicole

This recipe was brought to you by Nicole Hunn of Gluten-Free on a Shoestring: http://glutenfreeonashoestring.com/tom-sawyer-gluten-free-puff-pastry/
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